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Full text of "Missionary Visitor, The (1930)"

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Compliments 
of 
General Mission Board 



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f?7/ 



THE 

MISSIONARY 



Visitor 




Church of the 'Brethren 



Vol. XXXII 



January, 1930 



No. l 



A Prayer for the New Year 



«* 



Give me the Christ Soul, God — pure, brave, serene — 

To meet these days, 
Ready to walk, head high, with firm, sure tread, 

The Year's strange ways! 
Teach me to be a steward of all things, 

Owner of none; 
Glad to give up my will, since thine, my God, 

Shall still be done. 
Let me live grandly, seek the things that last, 

Press toward love's goal; 
Win — jewels? Fame? Nay, better; when earth's past, 

Stand — a crowned soul! 
So be my helper, Father — comfort me 

With staff and rod, 
Till I give back to Thee Thy year, well lived 

For man and God! 

— Adapted from Henry Hallam Tweedy 

$111 



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The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



A Call to the True 

H. C. EARLY 



GREETINGS to the readers of the 
Missionary Visitor ! Greetings to 
those who are wholeheartedly back 
of the missionary program of the church ! 
Let us rally to the battle cry of our 
General Mission Board. The missionary 
program must not fail. It must not be 
crippled even, though it has been crippled. 
Prayers which dig up their own answers 
in liberality are the supreme need of the 
hour. Our work must go forward or perish. 
But by the grace of him who authorized it 
and by the faith of the good people back 
of it our work shall not perish. It must 
grow and live. 

Let every man and woman, boy and girl, 
of the local churches be led into the light 
of the need. Nothing can be expected of 
people who do not know. And as we brave- 
ly face the present situation and relieve all 
financial embarrassment, our liberality and 
devotion should grow steadily and perma- 
nently, commensurate with the expansion of 
our work in both the home and foreign fields. 
Be it so. 







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ELDER H. C. EARLY, as he appeared in 
the yard of his home at Mapleville, Maryland, 
when the Visitor editor snapped his picture 
the day before Thanksgiving. 



Inspiring Words from Master Missionaries 



The spirit of missions is the spirit of 
Christ — the very essence of true religion. — 
David Livingstone. 

Prayer and pains through faith in Jesus 
Christ will do anything. — John Elliott. 

Some can go, most can give, all can 
pray. — Anon. 

If America fail, the world will fail. — Park. 

As America goes, so goes the world in 
all that is vital to its moral welfare. — Austin 
Phelps. 

I tell you, fellow Christians, your love has 
a broken wing if it can not fly across the 
ocean. — Maltbie Babcock. 

Every church should support two pastors 
— one for the thousands at home, the other 
for the millions abroad. — Jacob Chamberlain. 

It is my deep conviction, and I say it 
again, that if the Church of Christ were 
what she ought to be, twenty years would 
not pass away until the story of the Cross 



would be uttered in the ears of every living 
man. — Simeon H. Calhoun. 

More consecrated money — money which 
has passed through the mint of prayer and 
faith and self-denial for the Lord's sake — is 
the greatest demand of our time. — A. J. 
Gordon. 

There is money enough in the hands of 
church members to sow every acre of the 
earth with the seed of truth. — Josiah Strong. 

I will place no value on anything I have 
or may possess, except in relation to the 
Kingdom of Christ. If anything I have will 
advance the interests of that Kingdom, it 
shall be given up or kept, as by keeping 
or giving it I shall most promote the glory 
of him to whom I owe all my hopes, both 
of time and eternity. May grace be given 
me to adhere to this ! — Livingstone's reso- 
lution made in young manhood. 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



Two Months, God, and the Brethren 



Say not ye, there are yet four months, and then 
ccmeth the harvest? behold, I say unto you, lift up 
your eyes, and look on the fields, that they are white 
already unto harvest." John 4: 35. The words of 
Jesus. 

EXPECT great things from God, attempt 
great things for God," were the words 
of William Carey, pioneer missionary 
to India. The Church of the Brethren has 
truly incorporated this spirit in its missionary 
work. A letter has just come from Bro. A. 
D. Helser, missionary in Africa. He says the 
Christians at Garkida were walking fifteen 
miles to Gardemna where they were to par- 
take of the communion with the brethren 
there. God has kept his promise. We at- 
tempted great things and God gave the in- 
crease. Marvel of marvels ! Out here in the 
bush of Africa where in 1922 there was no 
written language, the name of Christ un- 
known, polygamy, leprosy, superstition, and 
fear rampant. Today portions of the Bible 
are translated, young men read it gladly and 
have taken the vow to be faithful to Christ 
unto death. The lepers are gathered in and 
are being cured. The eyes of men and 
women and children are turned Godward. 
Can you imagine that company of new born 



Christians marching off to a neighboring 
station to take the communion ! 

Xo wonder that men and women of our 
church have voluntarily offered generous 
sums of money to put the missionary work 
on a strong basis. It is now common knowl- 
edge that individuals have banded together 
to pay half of the mission deficit. They 
make this offer in the form of a pledge 
conditioned on the churches increasing 
$37,5CO.OO over last year and thus paying the 
other half of the deficit. These members 
want this challenge to be a success and they 
will help the churches make the increase. 

January and February are the two months 
remaining before the business year will close. 
On Dec. 16 the receipts were just $1,719.00 
ahead of the same nine and one-half 
months' period last year. The Mission Board 
cannot nor does it wish to conceal its con- 
cern. On the other hand there is a fine 
spirit for missions in so many places that 
optimism abounds for the success of the 
effort. Those who read this message hold 
the answer in their power. God has been 
faithful. Let us continue to expect great 
things from God and attempt great things 
for him. 



Swept In by the Tide 



One Good Deed Influences Others 

A MISSIONARY detained in America 
sent $100.00 as a missionary offering. 
This news was published in Mission- 
grams. A pastor presented this information 
to his people. Their whole Thanksgiving 
offering had been less than this amount. A 
man in the congregation felt he should do 
something and so gave $20.00. 

A great effort is being put forth to meet 
all the missionary obligations before Feb. 28. 
Let the good that you will do, help encour- 
age others to good giving. Send your offer- 
ings early. With the money, send news of 
any members who have made real sacrifices 
to make the work successful. 
3 £ 

ONE DAY'S PAY for January and Feb- 
ruary would go a long way toward meet- 
ing the missionary financial needs for the 
business year ending Feb. 28, 1930. 



Northeastern Ohio and the Mission 
Challenge 

The congregations of Northeastern Ohio 
are making splendid headway in meeting the 
mission challenge. Of the thirty-two con- 
gregations in the District, ten sent in more 
mission money in the first nine months of 
the year than they did in the twelve months 
of the year previous. Thirteen others gave 
more in the first nine months this fiscal year 
than they gave in the corresponding nine 
months last year. Nine are below their last 
year's giving. 

Missions or Decorating the 
Church? 

A young man in a young people's class 
meeting remarked that he had seen in the 
Messenger the great need for mission funds. 
He reported various amounts that would 
be necessary from different sized congrega- 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



tions. The class voted, at least by a ma- 
jority, to contribute from the treasury for 
this need. 

Later in the meeting the matter of deco- 
rating the church for Christmas was proposed. 
Some one suggested that the class help. One 
member remarked that the class had better 
give all its money toward this work. Then 
they would be sure how the money was 
spent, whereas they would not know if it 
were given to missions. 

Since this woman is not well informed 
and others may be in the same position, a 
little consideration in the Visitor seems 
timely. The missionary urge results from 
the Gospel of Jesus Christ. In our denomi- 
nation each congregation sends delegates to 
the Annual Conference where they elect a 
Board of Missions. The members of the 
Board receive no salary for their work and 
only a small recompense for the actual days 
spent in Board meetings. This Board em- 
ploys secretaries to carry on the work 
through the year. The missionaries who 
represent the church on the fields are first 
selected by the General Mission Board, then 
their appointment to the mission field is 
made by the Annual Conference. They are 
the cream of the youth of our church. 
Spiritually, educationally, physically and 
socially they must measure to a high stand- 
ard or they can not be appointed. 

It is scarcely possible for this woman in 
the class meeting to know the details of 
every missionary expenditure. However, the 
finances of missionary work are very care- 
fully safeguarded. The full statement of 
expenditures appears each year in the June 
Missionary Visitor, the Yearbook, and the 
Annual Conference program book and 
minutes. 

The decision of the class to give a certain 
amount from their treasury in answer to this 
special appeal, was not changed. 

The Women's Gift Toward the 
Mission Deficit 

The women are responding to the appeal 
for special gifts toward the mission deficit. 
The first three responses, which must have 
been sent almost by return mail after the 
appeal was received, totals $85.00. They 
were credited to the Mill Creek Aid Society, 
Northern Va. ; Goshen Aid Society, No. Ind. ; 
and Woodland Country Aid Society, Mich. 



Missionaries Increasing 

Among the signs that point to increasing 
interest in Christian missions abroad is the 
fact that the number of new missionaries 
sailing in 1928 exceeds those sailing in 1927 
by over one hundred. This is the first year 
since 1920 to show an increase over the 
previous year. 

Outgoing missionaries last year numbered 
667 but these are not enough to maintain 
missionary personnel abroad. At least 1,500 
new missionaries are needed annually to 
make good the losses due to retirement, ill 
health, and other causes, in the total Prot- 
estant mission force of about 30,000 mission- 
aries. North America has furnished over 
four-sevenths of that total, so that at least 
850 new missionaries are needed each year 
from North America to maintain the pres- 
ent missionary forces. — Student Volunteer. 

Congo Cannibals Won 

Masaba was employed twenty-five years 
ago by Congo officials to commandeer rubber 
gatherers, men or women. He had authority, 
and when men would not go with him to 
work, he would shoot them down, cut them 
up, put them in a pot, add palm oil, cook 
them, and eat them. He ate his hundred! 
All the natives knew him. He was also the 
executioner for his chief, hacking off men's 
heads, and was known as the most cruel 
monster in all that Congo country. 

In December, 1927, he came to the Deti 
Hill station, directed by the Heart of Africa 
Mission, and inquired for Ma Risasi (Miss 
Mary Rees, whose African name means Miss 
Bullets, because she shoots the Gospel so 
fast). She treks down among the villages 
around Deti, alone, wades the streams, 
tackles big black men about their sins, 
preaches about hell and Heaven and God's 
requirement of righteousness. " Ma Risasi," 
said this merciless black, " tell me the story 
you're telling in the villages ; I feel my sin ; 
I must get rid of my sin ; I must know God. 
Ma Risasi, tell me the story you've been 
telling in the villages." 

She told of the sacrifice on the Cross, ex- 
plained the hope of Heaven. The power of 
sin was broken ; a new dynamic came in. 
Since then he has been witnessing. He is 
learning to read, though probably fifty years 
old; he has started a school in his village; 
and four months after his conversion, made 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



a profound and absolute dedication of him- 
self to God. At the conference six months 
later, when Masaba rose to lead in public 
prayer, it was the sensation of the day among 
the three thousand natives gathered together 
to wait upon God for ever-widening revival. 
— Missionary Review of the World. 

News From the Industrial School 
(C. B.I. S.),Geer, Va. 

The following news items were gleaned 
from a letter received recently from Miss 
Nelie Wampler : 

The thermometer registered six below zero 
yesterday morning (Nov. 30) and two below 
this morning. The coldest in ten years some 
one said today. We do not know how to 
manage much of this sort of weather. 

We are glad to welcome Dr. Coffman in 
our midst. He will begin practicing soon. 

We are measly for sure now. No one 
escaped except little Miss Miriam Hersch 
and she has been staying in her mother's 
front room since she was born in order to 
escape it if possible. Five families from 
the outside have it too. 

Today (Nov. 29) we dressed a dozen ducks 
and thirty-seven chickens. It was no play 
job but every one went after it in dead 
earnest and by supper time we were about 
all through. Mr. Hersch cut their throats 
and the little boys hauled them up to the 
laundry where Miss Finckh scalded them 
and kept a dozen or more boys and girls 
busy picking feathers. I inspected them and 
plumped the birds and passed them on to 
the cooling line. You see it does not take so 
long to put across a task with plenty of 
supervised help. They brought almost $80.00, 
thirty cents per lb. for the ducks and thirty- 
five cents for chickens. 

Latest Word on the China Famine 

On the conflicting views concerning the 
famine situation in China a fresh ray of 
light fell in a cablegram to the International 
Missionary Council, New York, from the 
National Christian Council of China, Shang- 
hai, under date of November 25. The cable- 
gram carries the following up-to-the-minute 
information : 

" National Christian Council of China is 
convinced famine conditions are severe and 
supports the reply of China International 
(Continued on Page 6) 



THE MISSIONARY VISITOR 

Published Monthly by the Church of the 
Brethren through her General Mission Board. 
H. Spenser Minnich, Editor 
Ada Miller, Assistant Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS 

THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS ONE DOLLAR 
PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH dona- 
tion of four dollars or more to the General Mission 
Board, either direct or through any congregational 
collection, provided the four dollars or more are 
given by one individual and in no way combined 
with another's gift. Different members of the same 
family may each give four dollars or more and 
extra subscriptions, thus secured, may upon request 
be sent to persons who they know will be interested 
in reading the Visitor. NO VISITOR SUBSCRIP- 
TIONS ARE ENTERED UNLESS REQUESTED. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription 
terms do not include a subscription for every fom 
dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation 
of four dollars or more, no matter how large the 
donation. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions 
and make remittances payable to GENERAL MIS- 
SION BOARD, 22 S. STATE ST., ELGIN, ILL. 

Entered as second class matter at the post-office 
at Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 

Membership 
OTHO WINGER. North Manchester, Ind., 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, McPherson, Kans., 1908-1934. 
H. H. NYE. Elizabethtown, Pa., 1923-1932. 
J. B. EMMERT, La Verne, Calif., 1924-1931. 
LEVI GARST, Salem, Va., R. R. 1, 1925-1930. 
J. K. MILLER, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1928-1933. 
L. C. MOOMAW, Roanoke, Va., R. R. 2, 1928-1932. 

Officers 

OTHO WINGER. President, 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, Vice-President, 1908-1934. 
CHARLES D. BONSACK, General Secretary, 1921. # 
H. SPENSER MINNICH, Assistant Secretary and 

Editor Missionary Visitor, 1918. 
M. R. ZIGLER. Home Mission 5Wretary, 1919. 
CLYDE M. CULP, Treasurer, 1929. 



Note. — The bold type date indicates the year when 
Board Members were first elected, the other date the 
year when Board Members' terms expire. 

•Although Bro. Bonsack was not elected secretary 
until 1921 he has been connected with the Board 
since 1906. 



Editor's Note 

For many years the January issue of the 
Visitor has been devoted to India. This 
year the editor as well as readers is in- 
debted to B. M. Mow and other India mis- 
sionaries who are contributors. Our India 
Mission is the oldest we have in an Oriental 
country. The church is growing and the 
progress as set forth in this issue must be 
of considerable interest to those who have 
for thirty years been investing funds in 
this field, 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



The Women at Work* 

Dear Women of the Church, Suggestions That May Be Helpful 

Greeting: Here are some suggestions that may be 

For several years our church has been hel P ful in working out our plans: 

carrying a mission deficit. We have prayed, Hel P to find the following persons : 

, A a . iixi * individual to give $1,000.00 

and to a certain extent worked, to decrease 2 individuals to give 500.00 

it. The Lord has seen fit to bless our efforts. « individuals to give 250.00 

10 individuals to give 150.00 

Generous individuals are working toward 15 individuals to give 100.00 

raising half of the deficit. There will remain Be one of the following organizations : 

$37,500.00 to be raised before March 1, 1930. 2 5 ° Z^tSoZ To %l WV"? iS 

This must be done by the churches, which 250 organizations to give 15.00 

,, , , 1 . T , ^ , . 300 organizations to give 10.00 

is no small undertaking. In order that it 4C0 organizations to give 5.00 

may be accomplished without in any way Or hdp to secure 

interfering with the regular annual mission- »> £***££ £ g™ ;;;;;;;;;* |» 

ary budget, the Mission Board has appealed 2000 individuals to give 1.00 

to us to make the SUPER-EFFORT neces- Please P lace S ifts in the enclosed specially 

sary to go over the top by March 1. prepared envelopes that we may carefully 

A , ., , .. r ,, record same. What we do now for the 

And we, the representatives of the com- , ,. . A ■ . , 

, . , , , ' , . . . deficit must be over and above the regular 

bined organizations, extend this appeal to .., * « to 

1 ^ 1 t 1 1- Al d budget, 

every woman in the Brotherhood. Including 01 . . ; , 

±u a -a tv/t .I a t^ u w » bhould you need more than the enclosed 

the Aid, Mothers and Daughters, Women s ~, . • 

r\ ■ a -d-ui r-i u- ■ c • Christmas envelope, please send to Elgin at 

Organized Bible Classes, Missionary Socie- , s 

, ,.,, , ,, once and secure as many as necessary. Per- 

ties and some children s groups, there are - , • ,. . f ~ 

., ., , .. haps a good way to raise this special Christ- 
more than one thousand organizations rep- ^. r/ ,, , 

, , . , , r- . u A ma s Gift would be to secure a number of 

resenting at least twenty-five thousand ,, .. . .,..,, 

small gifts from individuals, 

women. ,, r _ , 

We are twenty-five thousand strong; at a 

We agree that this deficit should be at dollar a piece that wouM mean $2 5,000 00 

once and forever wiped off the slate. We This is the first time we haye eyer worked 

have prayed about it. Let us now see to it all together> Let us join our hands - a 

that the Lord can answer our prayers. great frie ndship circle and allow the Lord 

Let each organization immediately send to use us mightily, 

a Christmas gift of from five to ten dollars. The Council of Women's Work: 

This would afford a splendid start by Jan- Mrs. Ross D. Murphy, 

uary 1 and in the meantime you could plan Mrs. J. Z. Gilbert 

what is possible to do during the following Miss Nora M. Rhodes 

two months. ON THE ENCLOSED SHEET Mrs. Laura Swadley 

ARE SOME SUGGESTIONS. Miss Ruth Shriver. ' 

Now then, let us immediately enclose our ^ & 

check in the envelope marked " Christmas " LATEST WORD ON THE CHINA 

and forward same to the Mission Board at FAMINE 

Elgin. And then begin to plan what further (Continued from Page S) 

can be done during January and February. Famine Relief Commission to the American 

May we pray earnestly while we are Red Cross ' especially in the matter of relief 

planning and working and " See how great needs - We ltr S e an a PP eal for additional 

things the Lord will do for us." funds and recommend that China Interna- 

,, T , , ,, , ,„.„ ,, , , tional Famine Relief Commission administer, 

Watch the Messenger and 1930 Yearbook .... . ,, . . ,. r 

r . , . . . conditioned on their immediate use tor wm- 

for further information. , . , . . . , . „ 

ter and spring, and have so informed them. 

Your servants in His name, The National Christian Council of China, 

The Council of Women's Work. from whose office the message comes, is 

the cooperative agency of practically the 

* A churcb. SCnt t0 Women ' s or S anizations of the entire Christian movement in China. 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



Outstanding Impressions of My First Term of Service 



I. W. MOOMAW* 



SOON after coming to India I picked up 
the courage to write briefly concern- 
ing Three Things a New Missionary- 
Sees. But now to reduce the impressions of 
seven years to a few paragraphs is not a 
task which one would assign to himself. 
Let it be emphasized though that they are 
only impressions, and in that humble spirit 
they are recorded. 

The Width and Depth of the 
Missionary Task 

From the beginning missions have ad- 
dressed themselves to the task of making 
Christ known, loved and trusted by men to 
whom he had been a stranger before. This 
is a large task and it leads to an ever- 
widening horizon of service, for the Gospel 
is as wide as the needs of men and it has 
not been truly proclaimed until it touches 
the depths of their hearts. Were it only 
a creed to recite, or a " philosophy," our task 
would be easy. But it is a way of life, 
something to be lived. So in addition to 
preaching, missions have tried to allay some 
of the physical distress which non-Christian 
faiths seem to have ignored. It is hard to 
impress the beauties of eternal life upon 
men who are surviving on less than a jail 
diet. The poverty of Indian agriculture con- 
tinues still to be one of the most baffling 
problems of the church. 

Closely following in the wake of poverty, 
and very often one of its causes, is the ques- 
tion of health. The spiritual and economic 
loss due to ill health is amazing. So here 
we find over two hundred hospitals and as 
many dispensaries, carrying on daily in the 
name of the Great Physician. Nearly ten 
thousand lepers alone are under regular 
treatment. Still there are over 280,000 roam- 
ing at large, begging a little help here and 
there. Much of the laziness we hear of 
would be more correctly diagnosed as malaria 
or anemia. It would be hard to measure 
the contribution which medical missions 
have made and still must make to the 
church here. Then, too, there is illiteracy 
which at times seems to seal the door of 
every village against advance toward a more 



* Missionary, Anklesvar, India. 



abundant life. So Christian education from 
the most remote village school to standard 
colleges has also become one of the tasks 
of Christian missions. Down through the 
years there has been wide, almost extrava- 
gant, seed sowing and we are not surprised 
when Hindu men occasionally refer to Jesus 
as the most discussed Person in India. And 
herein is the depth of the missionary task. 

The depth of Christ's impact upon non- 
Christian life and thought cannot easily be 
measured. And we dare not be allured by 
the kind words of men in the absence of 
open confession. Yet the extent to which 
the Bible is being sought and read impresses 
us of a growing interest in Jesus and his 
way. Recently a Hindu high school principal 
so garnished his address to non-Christian 
students with quotations from the Bible that 
one had to believe that he knew the Bible 
better than many Christian ministers. We 
do not attend the movies here, but a pro- 
moter has recently stated that " The King 
of Kings " has had a most extensive run. 
When the film was shown in a city near 
here a Parsee gentleman made up a theater 
party; it consisted of two Parsis, three 
Hindus, two Jews and a missionary and his 
wife. The meaning of all this would prob- 
ably stagger us, if we could measure it. 

If there has been a wide awakening of 
Christian interest, there has also been an 
awakening of the forces of evil. These 
forces were probably never so marked as 
now. In their efforts they are ceaseless and 
brazen. We dare not be at ease in the 
assurance that Indian social life is being 
enriched by the name and thought of Jesus. 
The missionary task is broad and deep, but it 
will not lessen until India opens her heart 
and accepts her Lord and Savior. 

Missions Have Become an 
Enterprise of Sharing 

The "foreign field" can hardly be confined 
to all east of the Red Sea. Before coming 
to India we spent a few days with a young 
college friend who was then pastor of a 
small church in a large city. I thought of 
ourselves then as coming to the " foreign 
field " and of our friend as serving at home. 



8 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



That was true, geographically. Since then 
we have seen many whom we had regarded 
as foreign, open their hearts warmly to the 
claims of Christ; whereas some members 
of our friend's parish and many others who 
should have been members, have withheld 
their lives for themselves. So one is led 
to believe that the foreign field is wherever 
men withhold the lives that they owe. 

It is needless to say that the churches in 
non-Christian lands are still very weak and 
inadequate for the tremendous burdens they 
have to bear. So the spirit of missions 
seems to increasingly take the attitude of 
the older and stronger churches helping 
those which are still young and weak. One 
is impressed by what seems to be a kindly 
spirit of sharing. As the fellowship of 
Christ enlarges, other lands and other peo- 
ples become less foreign. 

God's Complete Revelation of 

Himself in Jesus 

If there is one impression that stands out 
above all others it is the fact of God's com- 
plete revealing of himself in Jesus Christ. 
To observe the Christian faith on the hori- 
zon of non-Christian beliefs leaves no doubt 
in one's mind of the spiritual supremacy of 
Jesus and his message. It has been well 
stated that Jesus alone appeals both to 
men's hearts and to their thinking. The 
Bishop of Dornakal, one of India's Christian 
prophets, has recently declared that " What 



the Hebrew prophets so unequivocally taught 
as the two-fold obligation of religion, is lost 
sight of in the sacred literature of the 
Indian sages. ' Thou shalt love the Lord 
thy God with all thy heart and with all 
thy soul,' readily appeals to the Indian 
devotee. But the great commandment like 
unto it, ' Thou shalt love thy neighbor as 
thyself,' falls on deaf ears. The essence 
of all true religion, 'to do justly, to love 
mercy and to walk humbly with thy God ' 
is what the Indian philosopher consistently 
ignored, else the age old tyranny of caste 
would have been unknown." 

Where the Christian Gospel is followed a 
marked change in human relationships takes 
place. Womanhood receives its rightful 
place. Debt and dirt and disease do not 
thrive. The cries of the weak are answered. 
Education finds a place. Men who them- 
selves may still be in the throes of poverty 
seek to give their children a better chance in 
life than they have had. We must not exag- 
gerate the extent to which this has taken 
place. Any complete change will take time. 
Yet there is unmistakable evidence that those 
who accept the Christian way of living do 
find themselves led on into a newness of 
life. Their neighbors who ignore this voice 
remain where they were, or go backward. 
This would be hard to explain apart from 
the spiritual preeminence of Jesus as God's 
revelation of himself. Than this, there is 
no stronger lifting nor saving power known 
to the minds of men. 




VILLAGE CARPENTRY in the Vocational Training School, Anklesvar, India. 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



Outstanding Impressions of My Second Term of Service 



A. RAYMOND COTTRELL, M. D.* 



OCCASIONALLY one meets those who 
seem to have the idea that the work 
of a missionary in a foreign land is 
" highly romantic " and that many of our 
days are filled with exciting and inspiring 
occurrences. They think that a record of 
our daily work would read like a book of 
adventure, full of surprising incidents and 
happenings of picturesque unusualness. It is 
true that most missionaries might write a 
few pages of that kind of events, but it is 
also true that most missionaries by the end 
of their second term of service would be 
emphatic in saying that such a record would 
not be at all characteristic of their every- 
day routine life and work. The day after 
day, month after month, year after year 
continuous impact of your personality 
against the deadening influences of a non- 
Christian people is certainly not romantic, 
whatever else it may be. 

During several years of the time that Dr. 
Laura and I were in medical college we 
were very fortunate in being in constant 
association with a number of returned mis- 
sionaries connected with different churches 
and coming from many countries. This was 
a most excellent thing for us, for in one 
way and another we absorbed some vital 
information from those good people, and thus 
were in a large degree prepared for what 
we later found in our own particular field 
in India. We therefore had but little of 
the disillusionment which is so great a shock 
to some new arrivals in a foreign land and 
which in some cases seriously affects the 
worker's usefulness. 

The strangeness and newness of living and 
working in a foreign land soon wear off, yet 
we often come across new and unfamiliar 
facts, some of which are so out of the 
ordinary that we are at first inclined to 
question their truth. This has happened so 
many times that we have frequently re- 
marked to each other that if a careful and 
trustworthy person makes what seems to be 
an extraordinary, or even preposterous state- 
ment, it is nevertheless no' doubt true with 
regard to the people, or the place, or the 
occurrence that he has in mind. This seems 



Missionary, Bulsar, India. 



particularly true with reference to state- 
ments regarding caste customs and practices. 
Of one thing I am convinced, and that is 
that very few indeed are the foreigners who 
ever get a real, true, deep knowledge of 
the tremendous pressure that caste often 
brings to bear in preventing the free con- 
version of the people of India to Christianity. 
It seems almost impossible for the free-born 
American to comprehend what it really 
means to a caste Hindu to meet the opposi- 
tion his people bring to bear to keep him 
from becoming and remaining a baptized 
Christian. 

In recent years one often hears that caste 
is rapidly being done away with in India. 
That is true with regard to a few restric- 
tions, such as the taking of food and water 
while traveling (the railroads with their 
long distance journeys are largely responsi- 
ble for this); but you just try baptizing a 
high caste orthodox Hindu, or try admitting 
an outcaste into church membership in a 
place where the others have come from a 
higher social class, and you will at once 
have an uproar on your hands that will no 
doubt speedily convince you that caste is 
a long, long way from being a thing of the 
past. Even so renowned and respected a 
leader of Indian opinion as Mahatma 
Gandhi has been able to make but little 
progress in his most commendable efforts 
to remove the " untouchability " of the out- 
castes. You may say that such conduct is 
unchristian. Yes, we know it is and that 
is one of the reasons for our being in this 
land. You may be disgusted, you may be- 
come righteously indignant, you may even 
feel like calling down the wrath of God 
(cf. Luke 9: 54), but like it or not, facts 
are stubborn things. The longer we are 
here the more we are convinced that caste 
in all its ramifications is one of the devil's 
strongest weapons in keeping India from 
Christ. 

Does this mean that we are discouraged? 
It does not. Is the task impossible? No 
indeed, not as long as we keep in touch 
with the one true and living God. Is prog- 
ress being made? Yes, there is encouraging 
progress, both with respect to the spread of 



10 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



Christian knowledge and ideals throughout 
India as a whole, and from the standpoint of 
the work of our own particular mission. 

I will cite a very recent event which shows 
that the impact and spread of Christian 
ideals and standards have been deeper and 
more widespread than may have been 
realized by many. You have always heard 
of India as a land of child widows, and of 
the miseries connected with their lot in life. 
In the next generation much of that par- 
ticular tragedy will be no more, for just a 
few days ago the Central Legislative Assem- 
bly of India passed what is known as the 
Sarda Child Marriage Bill. As soon as this 
law goes into effect no girl under fourteen 
years of age may be legally married. From 
a social standpoint that is one of the most 
radical and progressive pieces of legislation 
that India has ever passed, and it was only 
possible because after years of effort the 
standards of Christianity prevailed over the 
most strenuous opposition of orthodox Hin- 
duism. Aside from Christianity, the passage 
of such a law in India would have been 
utterly impossible. 

Yes, sometimes the load does seem heavy, 
the days long, the work appears to drag, and 
there may be little of music in the soul, 
and one may almost feel like hanging his 
harp on the willows as did the Jewish exiles 
in Babylon so long ago (Psalm 137: 2); then 
we remember that we are ambassadors of 
the Kingdom of Heaven, that we are fellow 
workers with the Lord Jesus Christ him- 
self, and looking about us we see some of 
the wheat that has been garnered. We see 
some of those choice souls who have been 
redeemed from the darkness and desolation 
of heathendom, those who are now our 
fellow laborers in the work of the church, 
and with whom it is a privilege to work. 



Like many a true missionary we may at 
times be ever so weary in the work we are 
doing but certainly we are not weary of it. 

Our own mission is working along edu- 
cational, industrial, evangelistic and medical 
lines ; all looking towards the bringing of 
those with whom we work to a saving 
knowledge of Christ as their Savior. In 
spite of the fact that I have been, and am, 
a medical worker I believe that the evan- 
gelistic work is the highest type of mis- 
sionary work there is. Then you may ask, 
why am I a medical worker? For the very 
simple reason that when we were preparing 
to enter on our life's work there was greater 
lack of workers in the medical profession 
than in any other line. We undertook to 
supply the greatest need that we knew of 
and we have never regretted our choice for 
a moment. We stay in this line of work 
because the medical missionary can get into 
homes that are often closed to any other 
type of Christian endeavor, he can work 
among all castes much more readily than 
any of the other missionaries, and there is 
far greater need for medical workers in all 
non-Christian lands than you who live in 
Christian countries can easily realize. 
Though some forms of service may be high- 
er than others, yet in due proportion all 
are needed ; and then one remembers that 
it was not one of the apostles or elders, but 
a deacon, one of the seven chosen " to serve 
tables," who gave such a glorious testimony 
for his Christ that it led to his being the 
first of the Christian martyrs. 

In conclusion I will say that the outstand- 
ing impression at the close of our second 
term of service is that mission work, whether 
foreign or home, is the greatest work in 
the world, and happy is that one who enters 
into it fully. 



* .T..T..T..T..*. I T ..T..T.. T ..T-i.T«.7..T..T..T.. 7 .. T ..T..T.. Tr. .*.. T ..T. V.aT:i.T..T..T..T«oT<i.\«Tc t T.»t»c.T«.T..Nr'..T..T.,Tiii t ..Ti:r 

ON FURLOUGH 

Catherine Culnan 

You think them here, but they are far away. 

Their spirits walk dim trails, or desert sands ; 

Their hands reach back to touch the trusting hands 
J Of those who looked to them to point The Way. 

You think them here? Oh, then you do not know 
JT The challenge, and the burning inner fire 

.j. That turns them back — to labor with desire 

For him who said not only " Come." but " Go !" 
J — Student Volunteer Movement Bulletin. 



i I t * i t l Tr 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



11 



Religious Education 

Our Elementary and Training Schools 
ANETTA C. MOW* 



EDUCATION is not salvation, but edu- 
cation can prepare the way of the 
Lord or it can obstruct that path. 
In spite of all difficulties and dangers the 
presence of religion in schools will help to 
make straight in the desert a highway for 
our God," so writes one who attended the 
Jerusalem Conference, in an article about 
" Religion in Indian Education." Her entire 
article proves the pressing need of religious 
teaching in the schools of India. She says 
it is being realized more and more that " the 
greatest enemy of the cause of Christ 
throughout the world is not Hinduism, or 
any other religion, but rather the indiffer- 
ence of men to spiritual things, their im- 
mersion in material concerns, and the selfish, 
godless view of life which distorts the whole 
outlook of the soul." 

Hence it is time that Christian schools 
awake to the great need and responsibility 
which is theirs, to give the very best re- 
ligious instruction possible. We know that 
only in Jesus Christ will India find her peace 
and salvation, and so it is most imperative 
that our Christian schools insist on the best 
curriculum and the best methods of giving 
religious instruction, motivation and rever- 
ence for the Unseen. 

Our own mission has always held this 
ideal, and efforts to carry out the ideal have 
been renewed with the passing years. Every 
year brings new methods and higher goals ; 
and with this very aim in mind the Educa- 
tional Committee in November, 1925, chose 
a committee to investigate the Bible courses 
in all of our boarding schools. 

This committee wrote to each boarding 
school, asking for courses of study used in 
each class, for names of text-books, for 
number of hours spent in Bible study and 
for suggestions and opinions. Neighboring 
missions in Gujarat were asked for the same 
information. When these replies were ex- 
amined, it was discovered that the majority 
of our schools felt that their present Bible 
work was inadequate in materials and con- 
tent, also in supervision, interest and results. 
There was a lack of unity in the courses 

* Missionary, Vyara, India. 



given in the various schools. The causes 
responsible for these conditions were the 
very small amount of suitable material in 
the vernacular, inefficient teachers, lack of 
missionary supervision, and lack of time. 

After giving this report, the committee 
was asked to submit a course of Bible study 
with a curriculum which would correlate the 
lessons in each grade and thus unify all our 
schools and prepare our students to enter 
our Bible Schools. 

Much time and thought was given in 
preparing the course of study to be used in 
each standard of the elementary and training 
schools. In making out this course, many 
obstacles were met. In English, libraries 
of books are available dealing with every 
phase of religious instruction, and tons of 
books filled with stories, which delight and 
help the child, are in circulation ; but such 
is not the case in Gujarati or Marathi. 
Turning from our own personal books in 
English, few in number though they be, 
to the small collection of religious books 
now available in our vernacular, makes us 
realize the dearth of material ; and we long 
for the power of a fairy wand to turn our 
English books into Gujarati and Marathi. 
But it takes hours of time to adapt and 
translate material into the vernaculars ! 

For the Kindergarten Course, the only 
thing to do was to find our material from 
a wide collection of the best children's books, 
make necessary adjustments and have these 
lessons translated. Then came hours of 
copying, done mostly by our older school 
girls, in order to make ten books to supply 
each of our Boarding Schools in Gujarati. 
It reminded one of the days when the Bible 
was copied by the hand of monks and 
scribes. 

The course, in short, is outlined as follows : 
A. Elementary 

Kindergarten. Lessons based on two main 
themes : The Heavenly Father's Care 
and His Gifts 
I. God's Protection in Nature, Thanks 
Due Him 
II. New Testament Stories 



12 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



III. New Testament Lessons 

IV. Old Testament Heroes 

V. Life of Christ, as Our Great Leader 
VI. The Early Church and New Testa- 
ment Character Studies 
B. Training 

VII. Old Testament Character Studies 
and How We Got the Old Testament 
Life of Christ 
VIII. Social Relationships and Christian 
Conduct 
IX. Acts and Epistles. 
Since very few of these subjects are in 
book form, it is necessary that courses be 
worked out and put in shape so all of our 
schools may have them. Just as the lessons 
for the kindergarten were worked out, so 
must lessons for each of the nine grades 
be prepared. The committee could not pos- 
sibly do the entire work alone, so assign- 
ments were made to various missionaries for 



a certain grade. Thus within a few years 
we hope to have the entire course complete 
and in general use over the mission. It was 
urgently requested that each school begin 
to use the outlined-course immediately, using 
the Bible as the text-book in each class. 
This is being done in our Gujarati schools. 
Arrangements have also been made for a 
yearly uniform examination. 

This course is not a finished product, but 
the very effort to produce something better 
is a blessing in itself, and so it is hoped 
that this endeavor to improve and unify our 
Bible Study will prove of real worth in 
our religious educational program. Although 
this outlined curriculum has received praise 
from a number of interested people outside 
our mission, we know that its real worth 
must be found in the way it is used, and 
by the results in the lives of our school 
children in the response they make to the 
eternal values of life. 



The Gujarati Bible School 



I. S. LONG* 



AN informed church is a transformed 
church," so I read somewhere ; and 
the converse is necessarily as true. 
This applies to individuals also. At all of 
our stations we have untaught teachers, un- 
taught in the Bible, I mean. This does not 
mean that they had no instruction in our 
schools and Sunday schools, for they did. Of 
that large number who might have come, 
eleven men and seven women sit in our 
present class. They reported as desiring to 
know the Bible better, to know the Lord 
more intimately, so as to teach and testify 
with more assurance and ability. 

We can testify that all these are desirous 
of passing the tests and examinations. The 
two teachers long that they become truly 
spiritually minded, that they willingly come 
into living grips with the truth as it is in 
Jesus, that they yield unreserved allegiance 
to him as Lord and Savior, and that they 
come to know better how to study the Word. 

It were a mistake to claim that our hopes 
are realized in each student, that all have 
become truly spiritual, or that they will 
grow into great soul winners. That the 
Spirit of God is working mightily in the 



* Missionary, Bulsar, India. 



hearts of some and having his way, that as 
many as respond to his call are growing in 
his wondrous grace, is a source of abiding 
satisfaction to the teachers. 

During each monsoon we have had several 
of our fisher brethren in class with us. Their 
daring faith in the literal promise of God 
is most refreshing, and is often a rebuke to 
older Christian's. They and others who are 
wholly open to guidance and blessing have 
come in touch with reality, and they can not 
keep still. They testify. Our Christ will be 
exalted in the lives of all such. 

The writer of these notes has hope for 
any church or mission that makes ceaseless 
unfolding of the Word to all its workers its 
determined resolve. God does not promise 
to bless our cleverness, nor our philosophy. 
He does promise to bless his own Word. 

Our interest in missions measures our 
Christian character; our knowledge of mis- 
sions measures our Christian attainment ; 
our participation in missions measures our 
Christian efficiency. — Henry C. Mabie. 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



13 



The Marathi Bible School 

C. G. SHULL* 



After many years of waiting, our Marathi 
Bible School for the training of workers is 
now in progress. The ignorance, poverty, 
superstition, and the dire spiritual needs of 
the hundreds of villages about us, have been 
such a constant pull on the missionaries' 
heart strings that we have perhaps erred 
in the past in attempting a program which 
is too extensive. How could we turn down, 
for example, calls for village schools, when 
we knew that if we did not send them 
teachers the children in the villages would 
remain, not only illiterate, but in spiritual 
darkness. So we sent them the best teach- 
ers we could provide ; but this best could 
scarcely be called good, even, and in far too 
many instances the workers proved unable 
to cope with the hard tasks which awaited 
them. The heart of Moses was burdened 
with the afflictions of his people, but the 
Lord kept Moses in training another forty 
years while Israel continued to groan be- 
neath the yoke of a terrible oppression. 
Tarrying is not always easy but the Chris- 
tian church can never release India from 
her bondage without workers adequately 
equipped for this greatest of tasks. 

Our school opened on June 4, 1929, with 
some of the older workers in attendance. 
The continued zeal and interest manifested 
is a constant source of inspiration and en- 
couragement. After class one day, a student, 
really the best in the class, remarked, " We 
know nothing," only to be followed by 
another who said, " We are just getting a 
thirst for knowledge," and still by a third 
saying, " If we could only have had this 
ten years ago." He was regretting the in- 
adequacy of past service, because ten years 
ago, before habits of thinking, teaching, and 
living had been so rigidly formed, would 
have been better. 

How grateful we are for the various re- 
ports of help in prayer. We felt so keenly 
the presence and benediction of the Father 
in the opening days, and he has not left us 
at any day since then. In the " gayansub- 
bas," or chapel services of praise in song 
on Monday, in the special chapels of inter- 
cession each Friday, in the daily classwork, 



and in the evangelistic effort in the villages, 
we have experienced his help and guidance. 
But there is room for growth, especially in 
the last phase mentioned. Philip, led of the 
Spirit, went to Samaria and preached the 
Gospel. "And there was much joy in that 
city." W T hat a joy today if we raise up 
some Philips who will write such history ! 
On one occasion, studying the evangelism 
of the early church as recorded in Acts, we 
were conscious of special blessing. It was 
one of those hours which a pastor and 
teacher sometimes has when he is conscious 
in a special way of that inspiration which 
lifts above the common round of experiences. 
We afterwards wondered about this and 
recalled that on that day the great confer- 
ence was in session at North Manchester and 
" prayer was made earnestly " by the whole 
church for our work on the mission fields. 
Brethren, support us with your money if 
you can, but above all things do not neglect 
this ministry of intercession. 




Missionary, Vada, India. 



DEMONSTRATION WASHING OF BABY. 

of Practical Arts, Anklesvar, India. 



School 



14 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



Character Building Among Indian Young People 



LILLIAN E. GRISSO* 



IN recent years, throughout the world, 
those responsible for the training of 
youth have been facing in a new way 
the apparent failure of their efforts when 
measured by the actual results obtained in 
conduct and character. In India, too, mis- 
sionaries have been earnestly seeking for 
methods that would bring a greater success 
in the building of Christian character. We 
cannot depend upon classroom instruction 
and repetition of moral precepts to do this. 
Character after all is something that must 
be wrought out in the crucible of actual life 
situations. For one thing, how can we ex- 
pect that children who have no money from 
year to year will learn how to use it or how 
to respect the ownership of other people? 
Yet in our boarding schools there are num- 
bers of children who very seldom have 
money of their own to use. Small wonder 
that they easily slip into the habit of steal- 
ing from their neighbors, or that later when 
they go out from school to establish a home, 
they neither know how to save money nor 
how to spend it wisely. This problem needs 
our consideration, for our elementary schools 
have done little, as yet, to solve it in any 
adequate way. 

We have been asked to give some incidents 
showing how we try to meet the task of 
building character. We respond, not be- 
cause we feel we have attained great suc- 
cess, for our most prominent feeling is the 
sense of the inadequacy of our efforts and 
of the failure to attain the desired results, 
but we would have you share with us the 
problems, the tasks, the successes and the 
failures. Similar incidents could be found 
in our other boarding schols, but I will give 
a few from our Girls' School at Anklesvar. 
Last year three groups, of our elementary 
school girls were put into cottages. That is, 
a group of eight or ten girls live together 
as a family. The group is changed occa- 
sionally. For the cottage plan to work 
happily and successfully the girls must learn 
to work together cooperatively and each 
must do her share. One day word came that 
affairs were not going smoothly in one of 



the groups. The girls were paying little 
heed to the directions of the house-mother 
and were neglecting their assigned tasks. 
Trouble had also arisen because some of the 
girls did not cook to suit the others and 
there was general disorder. Since we had 
tried to make living in the cottage a privi- 
lege, the first impulse was to take a short 
cut to peace by removing the trouble makers 
to the general hostel. However, on second 
thought it was felt that if these girls were 
ever to learn cooperation, forbearance, and 
other needed virtues, they had best learn 
them in the life situation in which they were. 
So several of the leaders were interviewed 
personally. A Bible lesson pertinent to the 
situation was read and discussed with them. 
Each girl was encouraged to make the prin- 
ciples of the lesson her standard of behavior 
in the cottage group. Improvement followed, 
yet there came some further reports of 
trouble. A group meeting was held and the 
matter discussed with them. The conduct 
of the group has since improved very much, 
and they promise to win out in their struggle 
to overcome their difficulties. We believe 




Missionary, Anklesvar, India. 



POUNDING OUT RICE from husk. School of 
Practical Arts, Anklesvar. India. 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



15 



much more has been accomplished than 
could have been done either by threatened 
punishment or by changing the personnel of 
the group. 

Each week a meeting is held with the girls 
in charge of the rooms. This year a special 
effort has been made to get the girls to take 
more responsibility for discipline in the 
hostel. One girl who is very quarrelsome 
had trouble in her room and wanted to be 
put in another room. Her case was sub- 
mitted to the girls in this weekly meeting. 
They decided to meet in special session and 
call the girl before them. They discussed 
the situation with her frankly and prayed for 
her, appealing to her to overcome her bad 
habits. At first she treated the matter as 
a joke, but before the meeting ended her 
attitude had changed. A marked improve- 
ment in her conduct has followed and her 
house-mother reports that there has been 
no quarreling since. The group are gratified 
at the results and feel that they have really 
accomplished something worth while. The 
experience has thus been of mutual benefit. 

One day a bird's nest with some broken 
eggs containing embryos held the interest of 
the girls of the Practical Arts department. 
So the regular lesson was set aside and the 
period used for sex instruction. The re- 
sponse was all that could have been asked 
for from a group anywhere. After the hour 
was over one of the girls in conversation 
mentioned a girl in school whose conduct 
had not been what it should, and said, " Oh ! 
tell her what you told us," and another said. 
" Yes, I think you should tell all the older 
girls." Other spontaneous remarks which 
followed gave evidence that the girls had 
received a new vision of the beauty and 
sacredness of God's plan. We pray that new 
ideals may have been born in that hour. 

Yes, we are often disappointed when they 
fail. But are they the only ones who fail? 
Have we not also failed? How much of 
the failure has been due to our own lack 
of understanding, patience, and sympathy? 
Then too we tend to forget the background 
of their lives, and we expect them to under- 
stand and appreciate ideals for which they 
do not yet have the capacity. Then again, 
we remember that there are professing 
Christians at home who congratulate them- 




LEARNING TO OPERATE THE UBIQUITOUS 
SINGER. School of Practical Arts, Anklesvar, India. 

selves when they have succeeded in taking 
an over-age child on the train without a 
ticket, or have been able to have friends 
employed in department stores buy goods 
for them at the employees' reduced prices. 

So we take courage. Rejoicing in each 
new evidence of developing character, and 
remembering that many years are required 
to grow an oak, we say to ourselves — 

" Be strong ! 
It matters not how deep entrenched the 

wrong, 
How hard the battle goes, the day how long. 
Faint not, fight on ! Tomorrow comes the 

song." 

In the strength of your prayers and in 
the consciousness that the work is God's we 
will continue to labor that " Our sons may 
be as plants grown up in youth and that 
our daughters may be as cornerstones 
polished after the similitude of a palace." 

" There is no more religion on the inside 
of us than goes on missions of mercy out- 
side of us." 



16 



The Missionary Visitor 

Bulsar Town Library 

G. K. SATVEDI* 



January 
1930 



JN these days you don't read much of 
Bulsar, so I thought I should write 
you a bit of our work here. Perhaps 
you have heard of an interesting meeting 
held in the town on las'. Christmas, which 
was entirely led and addressed by Hindus 
to celebrate our Savior's birthday. This was 
our' first new step in an evangelistic effort. 
Since then we have been thinking of some 
permanent work to be started among them, 
and we praise the Lord that he has given 
a chance for that. 

In July we opened a library with Christian 
literature and some country news. We are 
glad to report that in July and August 
there came together 785 readers, and 109 
individuals took the Gospel to their homes 
and enjoyed it. 

One of the brethren, Somchand Naranji, is 
taking care of the library each morning from 
8 : 00 to 11 : 00 o'clock and each afternoon the 
Bible School students take turns each week, 
two by two. Each Sunday several of the 
community go to the library and talk to 
the readers. We have found out that it is 
a very interesting movement for the spread 
of the Gospel. 



* Pastor and elder of the Bulsar church, India. 



In this way we are winning friends, and 
distribute the Truth very frequently. Many 
are getting their hearts cleared up from 
doubts and false ideas of Christianity. In 
two families we have an open privilege of 
praying and taking tea. The heads of the 
families visit us two or three times a week 
at home; they believe in prayer. This is 
not an easy thing for them. The critical 
eye of the public is shown toward them. 
I believe you will be led to pray for them. 
Certainly do that for his glory. 

On August 17 we held a public meeting 
in the town again, and a Christian friend, 
Mr. Timothy D. Awadhani (formerly of I. 
P. Mission), showed some wonderful feats 
of memory. At a time he repeats 1,000 short 
sentences on one hearing. He knows only 
Gujarati language, but he remembers and 
repeats any paragraph or poem of any lan- 
guage of the world on his first hearing. 
The public was very much pleased with 
this. He was given a silver medal and a 
little help of, money. This way or that way 
we look for a chance to come in contact 
with them and pray and praise the Lord 
for his name to be glorified. 

Last month the Municipality opened a 
new class for sweepers — the untouchables. 




READING ROOM OF THE BULSAR TOWN LIBRARY. Many of the magazines and papers 
are printed in Urdu and Gujarati. 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



17 



Some high class youths were teaching them, 
but they were not tolerated by their parents 
arul people, so they asked the writer whether 
he could provide two Christian teachers. 
The writer welcomed it and two young 
Christian men are going there now. In this 
way we have met with two open doors — 



the lowest and the highest among the 
Hindus. 

Next time I'll write a little more of our 
work, but now let me tell you that a bitter 
opposition has also arisen from the Arya 
Samajists, and sooner or later some un- 
pleasant things will take place. So please 
pray that his will be done in all. 



Confessions of a Perplexed Missionary 



SADIE J. 

A weekly eight-page bulletin, <; The In- 
dian Social Reformer," edited by one 
of India's own men, is widely circu- 
lated throughout India. Many missionaries 
are subscribers to this weekly. Quite often 
there are discussions about missions that 
become very interesting reading matter. In 
the issue June 8 there was an article entitled, 
" Confessions of a Missionary," a letter writ- 
ten by a missionary who did not wish to 
have his name published. He admitted that 
he was " perplexed," so we will call him 
by this name. He first explains that he came 
to Southern India from America, in 1911. He 
is an evangelistic missionary. His wife is an 
M. D. ; she cares for a hospital and serves 
many people in the area where they live. 

Perplexed has called himself thus because 
having worked in India twenty years he 
finds India very sick and needy, but in spite 
of all this, very irresponsive, and he wonders 
whether it pays to go on ; so he asks the 
advice of the editor, for whom he has great 
respect, and whose experience will perhaps 
give him some way out of his perplexity. 
He explains the why and wherefores of 
some of these conditions, this irresponsive- 
ness, how he himself ma}- be able to do 
more for India and asks whether he thinks 
it advisable for him to return to India when 
he goes on his next, near-at-hand furlough. 
His first years in the work were very 
encouraging. He has brought and continues 
to bring many souls to Christ, numbers them 
by the hundred. He has done much for 
them, works right with them, yet the 
baffling thing is the appalling gap between 
what they know, or should know, and what 
they do. 

He cites to the editor a concrete example 
of a Christian community where a few 



* Missionary, Anklesvar, India. 



MILLER* 

weeks before there was a fight, all starting 
over a very trivial matter. Heads were 
smashed, both bones in a poor woman's arm 
were broken. Perplexed and his doctor 
wife were called to make peace and patch 
up broken bodies. The arm was set, and 
it was fully explained to them how neces- 
sary to keep it just that way until they 
would return a week or ten days later. Up- 
on their return they found a quack had 
been called, who had removed the splint and 
bandage and the arm was dangling, ruined 
forever and the woman suffering excruciat- 
ing pain. He, Perplexed, asks the editor — 
now why all this, and what is the matter 
with a mentality like that? 

Next he shows how little attention is paid 
to women in confinement, how one from the 
very dirtiest of the dung heap of women is 
called in to be master of ceremonies at such 
a vitally important time as the birth of a 
child. Educated men seem helpless and will 
bow to the orders of these old women. He 
gives an example of a prominent lawyer, a 
very accomplished gentlemen, but whose 
wife is illiterate, and the mother-in-law is 
in the house ; when this lawyer's wife was 
confined, that sort of filth and ignorance 
was called upon to assist. Indian men, he 
says, are most jealous of the prestige of 
their sex in the petty affairs of life ; but 
what sort of system is this, which, at a 
supreme moment of life and death, requires 
the highest intelligence of the natural head 
of the house to bow to the ignorance of an 
old woman? 

He refers to bribery and how it is carried 
on to caste in all its forms, the Arya 
Samajis who trail him to counteract all he 
does by fair or foul means, the child mar- 
riage system, idolatry, witchery, and to 
some very immodest ways of women, yet 



18 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



who will not have a man doctor to care for 
them in times of sickness. He asks the edi- 
tor to explain this to him. The editor very 
well asks the public, especially readers of 
the Indian Social Reformer, to respond with 
advice and help for Mr. Perplexed. 

In following issues there are fifteen or 
more responses from missionaries, native 
Christians, non-Christians, and firebrands. 
The very first response is from a Methodist 
bishop who is very sympathetic and gives 
some splendid helps for Perplexed, advising 
him by all means to return to India from 
his furlough. The bishop has been in India 
thirty years ; in spite of it, he says, with 
all the difficulties and discouragements, there 
is no more fruitful field in the world than 
India. He shows that missionaries do not 
have a " dead set " against Hinduism, as 
the editor had intimated a few weeks before ; 
but that they are entirely opposed to idola- 
try, the belief in transmigration of the soul, 
caste in all its forms, cow worship, the 
system of priesthood, practice of having 
small girls offered in marriage to the idols 
in temples, child marriage, enforced widow- 
hood, and the purdah system (veiling and 
seclusion of women). We must be against 
these to be followers of Christ. The bishop 
has a very kindly attitude both for Per- 
plexed and for Indian weakness. 

An Indian law student is quite harsh, 
rather bitter, critical of missionaries and 
says they are not needed. India must be 
worked by Indians, he says ; so Perplexed 
should not return to India. 

One Indian, B. A., D. B., gives some good 
advice, showing him this is no time to be 
discouraged, and if he takes the proper 
attitude he will have plenty to do and per- 
haps after all see there are those who 
respond and are grateful for services ren- 
dered among them. He thinks Perplexed is 
needed in India, as well as all missionaries 
and mission money and support. He refers 
to some prominent missionaries, past and 
present, serving India most nobly, whose 
services have been appreciated, and such 
are still greatly needed. 

Another American replying thinks what 
we need most is persevering service. Faith, 
patience and sympathy will help a great deal 
to recover and cure those who are sick, 



meaning other nations as well as India. Too 
many people here think that one religion is 
as good as another and all alike are capable 
of leading men to the truth. This I cannot 
accept, he says. Truth is one and not many. 
It is possible that Hinduism and Moham- 
medanism, etc., hold some phases of truth 
that we Christians have not yet discovered 
or stressed. It is likewise evident to many 
that Christianity is in possession of some 
phases of the truth that Hinduism and 
Mohammedanism have not laid hold of. A 
more fruitful attitude would be this, that 
we behave as discoverers and learners to- 
gether. 

The next response is the very best of all 
given by the Indian contributors. We may 
judge that the author is a well matured 
Christian. No retorting and ill attitude ; but 
just good every day grinding away in ex- 
emplifying the service of the Christ is his 
solution to the problems of Mr. Perplexed. 
He is very sympathetic and says his expe- 
riences have been much like those Perplexed 
mentions. He advises him to return to India 
.after his furlough. 

Another missionary puts it beautifully 
when he says that in the majority of cases 
this indifference is due to a total mis- 
understanding and appreciation of the true 
Christlike attitude to life and duty. Also, 
he says, we foreigners get liverish, the best 
of us do ; the climate, our circumstances in 
this land and our experiences, do not im- 
prove our tempers or our power to keep 
impressions in their right proportion. 

One calling himself a " Seeker " reminds 
Perplexed that there are such places as slums 
and the lower world, in Europe and America. 
Perhaps Perplexed has never worked among 
them in his own land. If he had he might 
take a different attitude to India's indiffer- 
ence and to her sick state. He would hold 
in memory the people who do show their 
appreciation of his services, rather than 
those who seem to have no capacity to do so. 

" We have no apology for being in earnest 
about this thing of foreign missions, and will 
make none until Jesus Christ tells us He 
made a mistake in coming to the world as 
a Missionary." 



January 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



19 



Tales of the Pirs 

B. M. 



GO up and down this broad land of 
India and you will be astonished at 
the number of graves of Mohamme- 
dan pirs or " saints," mounds more or less 
neatly done up in brick and plaster and 
tended by worshipers. True they have been 
accumulating for several centuries, and we 
no doubt will conclude that their memories 
have been kept green and growing like the 
proverbial bay tree. At any rate some tall 
stories exist now and thousands of Mussul- 
mans, and Hindus too, believe them; and 
they go more or less regularly to the graves 
with oblations of moghra or champa flowers, 
oil to keep a light burning at night, and 
sometimes coconuts and rice. And there 
they meditate and pray for a boon, or in- 
dulge in religious ecstasies. 

Sometimes their faith is rewarded, no 
doubt, and so the credit of the pir is in- 
creased. We have noted the matter before, 
showing that this practice is rather incon- 
gruous with the spirit of original Islam; 
nevertheless it grows naturally out of the 
basic trend of human psychology, whereby 
we deify power and achievement and with 
this is entwined the need of a friend and 
some love, for the love of Allah is almost so 
small as to escape detection. 

I feel that I should pass on some of the 
tales of these worthies. Some may have 
sprung full-blown from interested motives, 
but probably most of them are of gradual 
growth. The miracle-working ones would 
impose great strain on our Western credu- 
lity. But they do appeal to the Indian heart, 
which longs for special manifestations of 
the power of the Unseen, or in other words, 
Magic. For is not the imagination of every 
people captivated by the idea of the hero 
with power to accomplish anything he 
wishes, merely by saying the word? And 
how fine if we had that power ourselves! 
Hence miracles are manufactured as natur- 
ally as sparks fly upward. 

It has been needful of course to condense 
and paraphrase, to avoid undue length. But 
I have tried to lay aside the occidental view- 
point, and retain the spirit and flavor of 



Missionary, Burjor, Navsari, India. 



MOW* 

the narratives. The first are from a little 
Gujarati book, "Tawarikh-i Pir," i. e., history 
of the Pir Nur Satgor (or Satagar), whose 
grave we live beside here at Navsari, and 
whose cultivators have befriended us. They 
call themselves the Satpanthis (true sect), 
and have inducted much Hindu doctrine into 
their Islam. The Pir is said to have come 
from Arabia first to Patan, Gujarat, in the 
reign of Siddhraj, and to have converted 
thousands of Hindus. He died in the Mo- 
hammedan year 487, or 1,094 A. D. 

The Pir was entering the Hindu temple, 
whereupon the priest stopped him short, and 
said, " You are a Mussulman, so the temple 
will become unclean." He replied, " If your 
gods are true, have them do the talking." 
The priest admitted that stone idols can not 
talk. Thereupon he commanded the idols 
to dance, and all began forthwith to dance 
and sing. Seeing this wonder the priest 
was highly astounded, and sent word at once 
to the king, who then came in person with 
his official sage Kanipa. They were aston- 
ished to see the idols dancing and talking 
with the Pir, and to hear them saying to 
the crowd, " O misguided people, all men 
should worship one only God." The king 
asked his sage to show off his powers and 
to hold a religious debate. So the latter 
had his staff fly heavenward, and asked the 
Pir to call it back. So the Hazrat (the ex- 
alted one) told his servant to get it, and 
the servant flew up into the sky and got it 
and laid it before Kanipa. They both did 
some other marvels. Then followed the de- 
bate with the pundits and sages, still extant 
in the book Yoga Vani. The result was 
that all were purified by the Satpanth at 
his hand. 

Later the Pir came to near Navsari, and 
according to his rule sat at one place to 
recite the Holy Glorious Word (Koran). 
Then every sort of creature came to hear. 
Beasts and birds crowded round him to listen 
to his sweet voice and be charmed at the 
sight of him. The local king there wanted 
to marry off his daughter, but she insisted 
that the Lord would provide the husband. 
She had her hunter fetch in a deer every 
day. One day he found nothing till he 



20 



The Missionary Visitor 



came to the assembly with the Pir. The 
latter, knowing his desire, cut off the thigh 
of a deer and gave to him, then by a 
touch restored the leg whole as it was. 
When the princess heard this, she knew that 
this was the man. So at her entreaty the 
king went to the Pir and was healed of his 
congenital pseudo-leprosy by one touch. In 
due time the wedding was performed, and 
at that occasion a mysterious light spread 
out from his dwelling to seven miles dis- 
tance. For the guests he made one of the 
two Navsari reservoirs milk, and the other 
sherbet. From that day till now the reser- 
voirs are called by these names. 

The orthodox Mohammedans also are 
not lacking in gifted Pirs. I talked with the 
head of the Chishti Order, Pir Mota Mian 
Saheb III, a very romantic and kind and 
capable gentleman. He gave me a booklet 
treating of their emoluments, from which it 
appears that he himself has done nothing 
exactly miraculous, but his fathers have. 
Back 700 years ago among many ascetics 
Baba Farid held first place. For thirty years 
he allowed no food to pass his lips, but 
when hungry he had but to place his body 
against a wooden cake or wooden bunch of 
grapes and his hunger was appeased. These 
wooden viands are still kept at his shrine, 
and are relics of great sanctity to the faith- 
ful. 

Of more recent date was Pir Mota Mian I. 
A description of the miracles wrought by 
this saint would fill a large volume (I am 
quoting, remember), so we will mention only 
a few. When he was five years of age he 



January 
1930 

was put in school. But without study he 
began reciting the Koran without limit. He 
was a hafiz (i. e., knowing the Koran by 
heart) from birth. One day some late-com- 
ing boys were grieving over their absence 
when the rock-candy was distributed, so he 
picked up some pebbles, blew his breath on 
them, and gave to the boys. The pebbles 
had turned into sugar candy. But his father 
dissuaded him from doing such things again. 

In his prime he did a great many wonders, 
and people used to flock to his house. One 
day a large crowd came unexpectedly at 
dinner time, and only a small kettle of rice 
was cooked. The Pir relieved anxiety by 
telling the cook, " Cover this cloth over the 
rice pot, utter BISMILLAH (i. e., "In the 
name of Allah," the formula pronounced by 
a Moslem when beginning anything) and 
go on serving out of it but don't look into 
it." And yet when all had finished eating, 
the amount of rice cooked was still there in 
the pot! One day he came to a creek near 
Anklesvar, and found some persons bathing 
in the deep water. He asked if there was 
any wa}^ to cross without getting wet. He 
got a scofring reply : " Yes, if you walk on 
the water." The saint thereupon took God's 
name and walked on the water as if he were 
walking on land. 

Such useful things as making barren land 
fertile, barren buffaloes give milk, calling 
down rain when needed, and curing leprosy, 
he did till the end of his life.. His power to 
give spiritual illumination was no less great. 
After death also he did marvelous works. 
Being called on a mission to Bombay he 




SARVAJANIK AMERICAN MISSION 
LIBRARY, NAVSARI. That strange word 
means " for everybody," but we add an 
aside in Urdu script, that " Mussulmans 
are specially invited." The books and 
papers we keep are mostly for them, and 
they come in considerable numbers in the 
evenings to read. A Christian brother is 
always present to talk to any who may 
wish. We rent the ground floor for about 
$5.50 a month, and we consider that we 
have good quarters. 



7TTTT 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



21 



promised to return dead or alive. He ex- 
pired there, so he appeared to his cousin 
Apajima in a dream to inform her. At 
much hardship she went to recover the body, 
but the Mohammedans there would not per- 
mit his removal from the temporary grave. 
She made representations to the European 
officers, and it was at length agreed by all 
to open the grave, and if body was in re- 
movable condition, she might take it. When 
the bricks were removed, wonder of won- 
ders, the grave was emitting sweet odor 
but there was no body in it ! Apajima 
understood, so she covered the hole with a 
cloth and said, " Don't try our patience, 
brother. Everyone here knows you ; pray, 
make yourself visible." She removed the 
cloth, and there was the body, quite fresh, 
to the amazement of officers and all. A 
good carpenter measured the body and made 
a coffin plenty large, but when they fetched 
it it proved too small. They started to 
squeeze the body in, but the lady again put 
the cloth over and said " Unless you stop 
this sort of thing I'll not take you to 



Mangroll." Then when the cloth was lifted 
it was found that on either side of the body 
there was a cubit of empty space inside the 
coffin ! 



Such then are some of the wilder tales of 
the Pirs. Hindu mythology abounds with 
others equally grand. Whatever their origin 
and whatever their possible sometime pur- 
pose of instilling reverence for God and his 
power, the net result seems to be only an 
increase of superstition and fear, and a great 
obstacle to appreciation of the difference 
between the probable and improbable, true 
and false, sensible and foolish, good and 
evil. When minds are preoccupied with pro- 
fusion of such florid tales, and we try to 
bring to them the simple Gospel, it sounds 
tame to them. This constitutes one phase 
of the difficulty of missionary work. I leave 
it with each one of you to imagine what 
you would say to a flesh and blood person 
filled with such a topsy-turvy world as that 
of the Pirs. 



Humanizing India's Women and Girls 



THE most effective remedy of all for 
the uplift of India's three quarters of 
a million villages is indicated in the 
following: "Why are there no flowers in 
your villages and your homes? Flowers 
bloom all the year round in India, but there 
are none in your villages. God gave flowers 
to mankind to make them bright and happy. 
You will never have flowers till you human- 
ize the women !" These words from the 
deputy commissioner himself, backed up by 
the actual presence and practical cooperation 
of his own wife, show the Indian civil service 
to be doing work worthy of its highest 
traditions. Mrs. Brayne, who herself has 
" inspected many thousands of babies," 
makes the following observation : " The peo- 
ple are thirsting for the uplift of their 
women folk, and only require a little awak- 
ening to satisfy their thirst. Clear proof 
of this can be seen in our own schools where 
well over a thousand girls have come crowd- 
ing into our boys' schools in eighteen 
months." With such living examples of the 
spirit of service as are being set by Mr. 
and Mrs. Brayne, all public servants in India, 



and all other members of the Indian public, 
as well, should ponder over these words 
and their significance for India's future: 
" If our public servants were imbued with 
a spirit of service, the things my wife 
and I see in the villages w r ould be utterly 
impossible. My v/ife and 1 saw a woman 
with twin boys deliberately starving one 
to save the other as she had milk only 
for one and did not know how to feed the 
other. There was a dispensary within three 
miles, where she could have learned all about 
bottle-feeding. Dozens of people must have 
seen the baby. No one had the public spirit 
to enquire and help." " The hope of rural 
India," says Mrs. Brayne, " is the girls. . . . 
Once a girl has learned to read and write 
with her brothers, several things will hap- 
pen. The inferiority complex will be broken. 
. . . She will teach her children all she 
learned herself and she will cease to be a 
slave." 

This is taken from Dnyanodaya, published 
at Poona, India, as an organ of six mis- 
sionary organizations working in the Bom- 
bay Mission area. 



22 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



Race Relations Sunday, February 9 



ON this eighth annual observance of 
Race Relations Sunday, the churches 
should remind their members, that 
the time calls for action ; that Christian peo- 
ple everywhere should turn to specific and 
practical measures of service in their alle- 
giance to him who went about doing good. 
First of all every local church and organiza- 
tion of churches should examine in the light 
of the teachings of the Gospel its own atti- 
tude as shown in its practice of fellowship 
of individuals of different racial and national 
groups. What are the churches doing to 
welcome into their own ranks different 
races? Church people need to study the 
history of the Church in its relation to the 
whole problem of racial contacts. 

Further, each local church should consider 
its relation to interracial conditions in its 
own community. For example, what are the 
local conditions as to employment for the 
underprivileged racial or alien groups? How 
does their treatment in the allotment of pub- 
lic funds for such public facilities and places 
of recreation, compare with those of white 
Americans? To what extent are these 



groups excluded from such cultural facilities 
of the community as parks, libraries and 
museums ? What is the opportunity for 
Negro, Mexican, and Oriental children in 
your community for elementary and high 
school education? What are the handicaps 
of the women of these groups in the lack 
of home conveniences ? Do the low earn- 
ings and limitation in employment for the 
heads of their families necessitate married 
women going out to work? What are the 
conditions of neighborhoods in which these 
groups live in relation to public control of 
vice and crime ? Does the community con- 
done neglect of police authorities in fur- 
nishing protection? Our churches and their 
members, through every agency of the 
community, should be actively interested in 
dealing with these and similar conditions. 
Suggestions for the Minister 

1. Exchange of visitors at the regular serv- 
ices from a church of another racial or 
national group may be planned. In some 
cities joint services have been held. 

2. Wherever feasible, there should be an 
exchange of speakers. 

(Continued on Page 30) 



ENLARGING YOUR MISSIONARY HORIZON 

What was the effect of India's indifference on Mr. Perplexed, missionary to India 



Was Perplexed advised to return to India after his furlough? Pages 
" cottage plan " in the Girls' School at Anklesvar affect character 



twenty years? 
17-18. 

2. How does the 
building? Pages 14-15. 

3. Account for the fact that " Hindu men occasionally refer to Jesus as the most dis- 
cussed Person in India." Page 7. 

4. Where and what is the "foreign field"? Pages 7-8. 

5. Give evidences of how the Gospel has lifted humanity in India. Page 8. 

6. Tell of a law passed recently which proves the depth of Christian ideals in India. 
Pages 9-10. 

7. How do the tales of the Pirs in Hindu mythology affect missionary work? Pages 
19-21. 

8. What is the hope of India? Page 21. 

9. What were some of the difficulties encountered in preparing a course of Bible study 
in the elementary and training schools in our India Mission? Pages 11-12. 
What place does the Bible school have in the educational program? Pages 12-13. 

10. Tell how one good deed influenced another. Page 3. 

11. Tell of the conversion of Masaba, a Congo cannibal. Page 4. 

12. What is the plan of the Women's Council to help raise the mission deficit? Page 6. 

13. What plans are being developed to prevent future famines in China? Page 24. 

14. Tell how the Gospel was spread by means of pictures. Page 24. 

15. What are the plans to double the church membership at Ping Ting? Page 25. 

16. How is the hospital at Garkida serving the community? Page 25. 

17. What and when is the World Day of Prayer? Page 26. 

18. Who of our missionaries are arriving on furlough? Who are returning? Page 27. 

19. Why does the doctor call Mamdi a brave boy? Pages 28-29. 

20. Juniors, do you know about the Story Contest? Page 30. 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



23 



News from the Field* 



CHINA 

Shou Yang 

Sue R. Heisey 
Strong Faith Needed to 
Resist Political Propaganda 

Like most other churches in China, the 
church at Shou Yang has been affected by 
unfavorable political propaganda and uncer- 
tainty in the government during the recent 
years. The spirituality of our church has 
not been deep enough to maintain a spirit 
of optimism and hope in the minds and 
hearts of most of the Christians. It takes 
a strong faith in the power of God on the 
part of the church leaders to avoid dis- 
couragement in the face of the depression 
which seems to have settled upon most of 
our church members. To help clear away 
these clouds of depression among the men 
Christians is the main task of the men's 
evangelistic leaders in the Shou Yang church. 

Bible Institute — a Means of 
Developing Group Loyalty 

In the early part of the month Bro. Heisey 
and Bro. Ho spent some time in East Yu 
Hsien. At this writing Bro. Heisey and Bro. 
Chao are beginning a ten days' meeting in 
the church at West Yu Hsien, about thirty- 
five miles from Shou Yang. Bro. Smith 
will join them in a few days. It is sort of 
a Bible Institute for both Christians and 
enquirers. The meeting will close with a 
baptism and communion service. Meetings 
of this kind always tend to develop a spirit 
of group loyalty among the church members, 
which is so important and necessary during 
these times in China. 

The Church the Center of 
Community Life 

The men's evangelistic group at Shou Yang 
are trying to inspire the members of our 
country churches to think out ways and 
means by which their church may become 
the center of community life and activities, 
and to seize every opportunity for such an 
advance even if it means sacrifice on their 
part. The church at Ch'in Ch'uan is quite 
encouraging in this respect, although the 
evangelistic spirit of the Christians is not 
what it should be. 

A Definite Call 
to Prayer 

We are trying to get the people in our 
country churches to have an experience in 
answered prayer, to pray for definite per- 
sons and objects. The church at Chang Tsun 
has promised to pray very definitely for the 
conversion of five families in their little 
village during the year of 1930. We are 
trying to get others to pray for these same 
families. Other churches will likely follow 



the example of this church. If you would 
like to pray for some of these we can send 
you their names. 

Enthusiasm for Evangelistic 
Movement 

We are getting back of the five year evan- 
gelistic movement in China in a very en- 
thusiastic manner. We sent two delegates 
to a recent promotion meeting. They re- 
turned with enlarged visions of the work 
of the church in China and an earnest desire 
to get this five year movement started off 
at Shou Yang at the earliest possible date. 
The missionaries have also pledged them- 
selves to spend more time in prayer that 
we might be the most possible help in 
carrying out this movement. 

Sister Cripe Begins Work 
at Yu Hsien 

Sister Winnie Cripe, just back from 
America, has been located at Shou Yang 
and will take up work with the women in 
the Yu Hsien county. She made a trip there 
last week and seems very much pleased and 
encouraged with the work at that place. 
While there she also succeeded in renting 
a little Chinese court for herself and her 
evangelist to live in. She expects to go up 
again this week to spend some time work- 
ing with the women at that place. 

Rejoicing Over the Return 
of Missionaries 

Brother Harland Smith's and Sister Grace 
Clapper arrived from furlough Sept. 18. 
They had been gone so long the Chinese 
were wondering if they were coming back. 
Sister Winnie Cripe stopped at Liao Chou 
to attend the mission meeting before com- 
ing to Shou Yang. The foreign children are 
also rejoicing because of the return of their 
former playmates. 

Liao Chou 

Ernest M. Wampler 
Love Feast 
at Liao Chou 

Liao Chou Church held its love feast Oct. 
27. There were forty-four women and 
thirty-six men who took of the sacred em- 
blems. Bro. Oberholtzer officiated. 

Miss Ulrey Located 
at Liao Chou 

Miss Ruth Ulrey has just been added to 
our staff of foreign workers at Liao. She 
is taking over part of the village work as 
Miss Senger finds that she cannot cover 
such a large territory as is allotted to Liao. 
She and Miss Senger are starting out to 
the Chin Chou territory in a day or two. 



24 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



Increased Enrollment 
in Boys' School 

The boys' school reports an enrollment of 
65 for the fourth, fifth and sixth grades. 
This is an increase over the last five years, 
and a greater percentage is from our terri- 
tory. With the increase of expenses fewer 
are coming from other territories. 

Bible School Women 
Eager to Learn 

The fall term of the Bible school opened 
with the largest enrollment we have had 
this early in the season. Twenty have been 
enrolled to date while others are waiting to 
come till after the busy fall season is over. 
They are a most interesting group of women, 
ranging in age from seventeen to seventy 
years, all eager to learn. The three who 
are over sixty years of age are not attempt- 
ing to learn Chinese characters, but are do- 
ing some memory work in songs and Bible 
verses, and listening to the Bible stories and 
doctrine in the classes. 

Village Touring — Twenty -six People 
Ask for Baptism 

Some village touring has been done in 
the Matien district, where Christian life is 
growing and the outlook is encouraging. A 
communion service was held at Matien with 
some twenty men and five women present. 
Bro. Oberholtzer, Bro. Wampler and Sister 
Senger spent some ten days - here visiting 
and encouraging the members. The last few 
days were spent in an inquirers' class, where 
many learned more about the Christian way 
of living. Fifteen men and eleven women 
and girls came forward, wanting to be 
followers of Christ, and hoping to enter the 
church by baptism in the near future. 

Mission Conference — Missionaries 
from Furlough an Inspiration 

Our yearly Mission Conference has just 
closed. All of the mission family who were 
able to attend enjoyed the social and spirit- 
ual fellowship very much. We were so 
pleased to have so many with us who had 
just returned from furlough. We rejoice 
over the many things they told us about 
the home land, especially the things con- 
cerning mission work. Liao was so glad for 
all the guests because we seldom have visi- 
tors. 

Ping Ting 
Emma Horning 
Plans to Prevent 

Future Famines 

Bro. Yin was invited to lead a five-day 
retreat at Ching Chuan, one of our neigh- 
boring missions. It was a time of deepening 
the spiritual life of all the members as well 
as discussing the many problems of the 
church. At this time Mr. Outerbridge, the 
agricultural missionary of this district, took 
an opportunity to present his work. He has 



been experimenting in his district with 
grains that are suited to dry farming, for 
the purpose of preventing future famines. 
He has found a kind of Kaffir corn, origi- 
nally from Arabia, which will mature with 
one third as much rain as it takes for other 
grain. The International Famine Relief 
committee has subscribed $40,000.00 and the 
Shansi Famine Relief committee has sub- 
scribed $5,000.00 to buy this kind of grain 
and distribute among the farmers. The 
various mission leaders are asked to aid in 
the distribution of the knowledge and this 
grain. 
The Gospel Spread by 

Means of Pictures 

Mr. Chao Ching Heng, the head nurse in 
the men's hospital, while home on a vaca- 
tion visited some relatives in a village. Here 
he met a woman who had been in the hos- 
pital for several weeks and was healed 
through a successful operation. While there 
she was given some Christian pictures and 
had learned a little about Christianity. She 
was telling all the sick around her to go 
to the hospital and be healed. Some of the 
pictures she had put on the walls of her 
home and others she had given to her 
neighbors, but she did not fully understand 
the meaning of them. When Mr. Chao came 
she asked him to explain them and as he 
talked a crowd gathered. When he had 
finished he was asked to go to other homes 
and explain the pictures there. Thus he 
had an opportunity to teach in many of the 
homes and witness for the Master he loves 
to serve. 
Increased Enrollment and 

Better Spiritual Atmosphere 

Sister Metzger says that the enrollment 
of the boys' and girls' schools is larger than 
it was in the spring term, and that the 
spiritual atmosphere is decidedly better. The 
total enrollment is 160. 
Mothers Appreciate 

Hospital Conveniences 

The hospital workers are very busy even 
during the harvest season this year. Moth- 
ers are beginning to appreciate the con- 
veniences and comfort of the hospital. So 
far this year there have been fifty-four 
obstetric cases. 

Seven Young Men and Women 
Enter Nurses' Training 

The training school of sixteen boys and 
girls began their class work Sept. 16. Seven 
new nurses entered this fall, two boys and 
five girls. All but one of the girls dropped 
out last year for various reasons. Two 
married, one died and several were sick. 

Work in Evangelistic Tent — 
Bro. Crumpacker Assists 

Our evangelistic tent opened its fall work 
in full force at Soa Fan. One of our former 
evangelists has been elected head of this vil- 
lage and is a power for good among his peo- 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



25 



pie. He preached regularly in the tent dur- 
ing the evangelistic meetings there. Bro. 
Crumpacker spent ten days with these tent 
workers until he was called to a distant 
village in the mountains to conduct the 
wedding ceremony of the son of a Christian 
at this place. He was loath to leave this 
work but felt it his duty to answer the call 
and encourage the Christians in this isolated 
district. 

Long Day of Donkey Travel 
to Reach Group of Christians 

Sister Schaeffer spent a week in Tien 
Ching Keo, working among the little group 
of eleven Christians at this place. It takes 
a long day of hard donkey travel up and 
down the mountains to reach this place. 
Miss Chang, one of the graduates of the 
girls' school, is now going with Sister 
Schaeffer on these village trips. 

Harvest Meeting — 

a Time of Thanksgiving 

Sept. 1 the church held a harvest meeting. 
The church was decorated with fruit, flow- 
ers and vegetables. A bank of millet and 
cornstalks was on the pulpit. These gifts 
were distributed among the poor of the city. 
A program was given. One speaker, a nurse 
in the army, emphasized our giving thanks 
with our hearts, not with our lips. He is 
a wide-awake Christian worker. 

Reception Given for 

the Sollenberger Family 

Sept. 22 a reception was held in the church 
for the Sollenberger family who have just 
moved into our midst. We are very glad 
for their addition to our work here. Little 
Alberta is having whooping cough at present 
but is not confined to her bed. 

Pupils Anxious to Own Bible 
and Other Books 

The Christian girls of the school are get- 
ting interested in the Five Year Movement, 
and attended most of the meetings held by 
Chang Fu Ling at this place. The pupils 
in the third and fourth grades are wanting 
to own the religious education books used 
in their work. They are also providing 
themselves with Bibles without any sugges- 
tions from their teachers. One of the third 
grade pupils witnessed, " In the summer 
when I was home, I told my father all 
about this new religion." 

Plans to Double Church 
Membership 

Mr. Chang Fu Ling, one of the secretaries 
of the China Christian Council of Shanghai, 
spent two days with us in the interest of 
the Five Year Movement. Bro. Smith, Bro. 
Ho and Sister Neher came from Shou Yang 
to be with us in these meetings. This move- 
ment plans a general revival of the church in 
China. The aim is to make every member 



a worker and thus double the membership 
in five years. Mr. Chang has been in Amer- 
ica eight years and is much interested in 
church work. 

Industrial Work in 

Woman's Bible School 

Thirty-four women and children are living 
in the Woman's Bible School court. This 
represents about half of our school for the 
rest live in their homes and come to the 
school for classes. Most of the women 
spend half their time making the beautiful 
industrial work which many of the aid 
societies and individuals at home are so 
kindly selling for the support of this work, 
and various charitable needs. Bro. Jung is 
head teacher and the spiritual life of the 
school. 

Work in the Home, the 
Foundation of the Church 

Home is the foundation of society, of the 
church and of the nation. With these truths 
in mind the women evangelistic workers of 
the city are holding from two hundred fifty 
to three hundred meetings each month in 
the homes of the city and surrounding vil- 
lages. The main theme of these meetings 
is worshiping God in the home — giving 
thanks for food at each meal and having 
prayers night and morning. Most of these 
women know little of Christianity, but when 
they have taken this step they will have 
made considerable progress in the Christian 
life. 

AFRICA 

Esther Beahm 
Dr. Robertson Rids Country of 
a Dangerous Creature 

One night early in the month a cow was 
killed in a near-by village. Dr. Robertson 
helped put poison on the carcass. The next 
day they found a dead leopard near by. 
The missionaries as well as the Buras were 
glad to be rid of one of these beautiful 
creatures which make the night unsafe. 

Fifty Lepers 
Treated Daily 

As far as we know this month brought 
the largest number of patients in the history 
of the hospital at Garkida which of course 
made the largest number of treatments. 
There were 4,640 with a daily average of 
over 154. Part of this good record is due 
to the arrival of 36 lepers from Yola and 
the daily dressing of their ulcers. Four 
other new lepers began treatments. We 
now give treatments to fifty lepers. A daily 
trip is made to the leper camp which is two 
miles from the hospital. A young man, a 
leper, who came from the Sudan United 
Mission is being trained to dress and assist 
in giving leper treatments. 



26 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



mmmm 



mmmmm 



The editor invites helpful contributions for this department of the Visitor 



tmm 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR WOMEN'S 
MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 

Based on "The Crowded Ways," Chapter 5 

Theme : Remaking the City 

" Why build these cities glorious 
If man unbuilded goes? 
In vain we build the work unless 
The builder also grows." 

Devotions 

Hymn : " Onward Christian Soldiers " 

Scripture: Acts 17: 16-32 

Prayer : That we may have a spirit of 

helpfulness for all who go to our cities; 

for spiritual vision to see the power of 

God. 

Hymn : " Watchman, Tell Us of the Night " 

Chapter Outline 

1. Making Visions Real. What is city 
planning? Church city planning? Pages 
125-134 

2. Social Welfare and Social Service. 
Pages 135-138 

3. Service Needed in Deterioration Areas. 
Pages 138-145 

4. Stories of Changing Neighborhoods. A 
Brooklyn Church. Pages 145-149 

5. Church Cooperation. Pages 149-157. 
Discussion : What Is My Community Do- 
ing? If Nothing, Why Not? 

Other Program Suggestions : 

1. A unique method of presentation would 
be a demonstration based on the infor- 
mation in the chapter. Ask five people 
to form a committee, each impersonating 
one of the following : City Missionary, 
Society Woman, Social Worker, City 
Nurse, Club Woman. Their problem 
might be, " Remaking the City." 

WORLD DAY OF PRAYER FOR 

MISSIONS 

March 7, 1930 

We now approach the observance of the 
World Day of Prayer for missions which 
occurs each year on the first Friday in Lent. 
This year the date is March 7. 



The theme, "That Jesus May Be Lifted 
Up," has as its central thought Jesus, the 
world's Savior. Throughout the program 
time is given for meditation, thanksgiving, 
confession, dedication and intercession. Let 
us make it a real day of prayer and witness- 
ing for Christ on this nineteen hundredth 
anniversary of Pentecost. Let us begin now 
to pray for a fresh outpouring of the Holy 
Spirit. Let us read again the life of our 
Lord and the Acts of the Apostles. 

Preparation for this day should be made 
with a feeling of consecration. Women's 
groups should begin planning early for this 
very important event. Give the service pub- 
licity in your local newspaper and from the 
pulpit. The occasion is worthy of our best 
efforts. Young women and students should 
be encouraged to plan for special evening 
meetings when large numbers can attend. 

The program " That Jesus May Be Lifted 
Up," 2c each, $1.75 per hundred. 

" The Call to Prayer " with daily cycle, 
free. 

Seals for letters and invitations, 25c per 
hundred. 

Order all supplies early from our General 
Mission Board. 

Nora M. Rhodes. 

SUGGESTIVE MISSIONARY SOCIETY 
CONSTITUTION 

Article 1 — This society shall be called the 
Woman's Missionary Society of the Church 
of the Brethren of (congregation), (state) 

of the (district). 

Art. 2 — The object of this society shall be 
to aid in interesting Christian women in 
mission work in the world at large. 

Art. 3 — Any person paying (... cents) an- 
nually as dues may become a member of 
the society. 

Art. 4 — The officers of this society shall be 
a president, vice-president, secretary and 
treasurer, who together shall constitute an 



January 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



27 



executive committee to administer the 
affairs of the society. 
Art. 5 — The meetings of the society for busi- 
ness and information shall be held monthly. 
The anniversary meeting shall be held in 
September, when the annual reports of the 
secretary and treasurer shall be read and 
the officers for the ensuing year elected. 

By-laws of the Society 

Sec. 1— It shall be the duty of the president 
to preside at all meetings of the society 
and to supervise the general interests. 

Sec. 2 — It shall be the duty of the vice- 
president to perform the duties of the 
president in the absence of that officer and 
to aid in, devising means for the efficiency 
of the society. 

Sec. 3 — It shall be the duty of the secretary 
to conduct the correspondence of the so- 
ciety, to keep a record of the proceedings 
of the society and to give notices of the 
meetings. 

Sec. 4 — It shall be the duty of the treasurer 
to collect the dues of the members, keeping 
a book account and to hold in trust the 
funds of the society. 

Sec. 5 — Order of service for monthly meet- 
ing: 

Opening prayer. 
1— Roll call. 

2 — Reading and approval of minutes. 
3 — Unfinished and miscellaneous business. 
4 — Devotional service. 
5 — Lesson period. 
6 — Social period. 
7 — Adjournment. 

Sec. 6 — Each woman connected with the 
society shall try to induce others to become 
members and shall do what she can to 
add to the general interest, remembering 
in prayer the interests of the society. 

Sec. 7 — This constitution and these by-laws 
may be changed or amended at any regular 
meeting of the society by a two-thirds 
vote of the members present, notice of 
such intention having been given at a 
previous meeting. 

Nora M. Rhodes. 

THE MEXICAN RETURN PROJECT 

The Mexican Committee on World Friend- 
ship Among Children is developing plans for 
a reciprocal project with the children of the 



United States, to be carried out in 1930. A 
million and a quarter children of primary 
school age will share in the sending to the 
United States of 48 exhibits of the arts and 
industries of their country. There will be 
one exhibit for each state. 

ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF 
MISSIONARIES 

B. Mary Royer sails for India, from New 
York City, December 28, via White Star 
Line, S. S. Doric. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Paul Gibbel and Frances 
Kathleen, and Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. 
Helser and Esther Mae, are scheduled to 
arrive in New York City, December 30, via 
S. S. Berengaria. 

Beulah Woods and Ethel Roop sailed from 
India Nov. 29, via S. S. Sawokla. 

MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Conference Offering, 1929. As of November 30, 1929, 
the Conference (budget) offering for the year ending 
February 28, 1930, stands as follows: 
Cash received since March 1, 1929 $172,608.72 

(The 1929 budget of $363,000.00 is 47.6% raised, 
whereas it should be 75%.) 

Mission Board Treasury Statement. The following 
shows the condition of mission finances on November 
30, 1929: 

Income since March 1, 1929, $212,784.57 

Income same period last year, 192,841.94 

Expense since March 1, 1929, 197.203.84 

Expense same period last year, 213,835.64 

Mission deficit November 30, 1929, 84,790.74 

Mission deficit October 31, 1929, 76,038.50 

Increase in deficit for November 30, 1929, . . . 8,752.24 

November Receipts. Contributions were received 
during November by funds as follows: 

Total Rec'd 
Receipts since 3-1-29 

World-Wide Missions $2,393.45 $34,336.38 

Student Fellowship Fund— 1928-29 5.00 2,576.19 

Aid Societies' Mission Fund— 1927 . 8.00 2,858.86 

Home Missions 1,140.10 2,193.99 

Greene County, Virginia, Mission 43.73 87.58 

Foreign Missions 178.92 3,501.38 

Junior League— 1929 339.65 1,035.21 

B. Y. P. D.— 1929 209.75 1,588.90 

Home Missions Share Plan 50.00 235.25 

Challenge Fund 1,000.00 1,050.00 

India Mission 47.00 1,451.57 

India Native Worker 32.00 315.25 

India Boarding School 50.00 611.97 

India Share Plan 380.00 3,148.46 

India Missionary Supports 2,029.31 15,094.73 

Vyara Church Building Fund .... 515.67 3,832.89 

Ahwa Church Building Fund 25.00 40.62 

China Mission 56.50 1,496.51 

China Share Plan 175.00 1,188.25 

Liao Chou Hospital 50.00 60.00 

China Missionary Supports 477.22 8,600.70 

Sweden Missionary Supports 275.00 1,100.00 

Denmark Mission 5.00 5.00 

Africa Missionary Supports 486.62 5,439.31 

Africa Mission 103.27 3,953.48 

Africa Share Plan 25.00 876.94 

General Relief 1.00 2.00 

Brooklyn, N. Y. Church Bldg. Fund 5.00 5.00 

Conference Budget Donations 487.53 73,223.99 

Conference Budget Designated 26.99 247.97 



28 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



mmm m$$mmm 



Mamdi, a Brave Boy of Kujeffa 

DR. RUSSELL L. ROBERTSON* 




MAMDI, a manly, brave boy. 

LOOK closely at Mamdi's picture, pro- 
nounced Mam-dee. Isn't he a serious 
but smart looking little fellow? He 
is just as nice and good as he looks to be. 
If you could play with Mamdi and knew 
him as you know your cousins and neigh- 
bors, you would say, "Why, Mamdi is as 
good as if he was white." Sure, there is 
no difference. He is sunburned a little more 
than your skin is in the summer time, but 
his little heart is just as true to what he 
knows is right as yours is. Mamdi was a 
very manly and brave boy. Funny about 
these little Africans. They get sick; they 
get sores on their feet ; they eat until their 
little stomachs stick out and also they are 
afraid of the doctor and the hospital just 
like you. 

.We learned to know this little boy very 
well. We knew his father and mother and 
his two sisters. All this happened over a 
year ago, but his mother and father still 
come to see us sometimes and bring a 
chicken or some eggs to help pay for 
Mamdi's doctor bill. You see his left arm 
is bandaged up and he has to hold it with 
his right hand. You think his arm was 
broken — no, guess again. Very few Bura 
* Missionary, Garkida, Africa. 



boys and girls get broken limbs. There are 
no automobiles, bicycles, nor sleds to cause 
such accidents. About the only way that a 
boy can break his arm in Africa is to fall out 
of a tree, and the trees do not grow very 
tall here, so what is a boy going to do who 
wants to break his arm? I have seen only 
one Bura child with a broken arm. 

One morning I looked out in front of the 
hospital and there stood a man with a little 
boy on his back. It was Mamdi on his 
father's back. Think of going to the hospital 
on your father's back. Even grown up 
people go to the hospital that way out here. 
Mamdi's father had carried him fifteen miles 
to the strange white doctor who was sup- 
posed to be able to cure all sick folks. I 
said the boy was brave, and his parents were 
trustful and braver than many Africans. 
Would your parents take you to a strange 
man in a strange and queer kind of building 
if you were sick? Mamdi was very sick. 
He was in the hospital nearly three months. 
His mother came with him and stayed with 
him all the time. His father went home 
to do the farm work, but every Monday, 
the day before market, his two sisters, about 
ten and twelve years old, would come from 
Kujeffa with loads of guinea corn and beans 
on their heads. You see we had no nurse 
nor dietitian in the hospital and Mamdi's 
mother had to cook for him. Was this a 
burden to her? No, she loved her boy. She 
sat by his cot many nights when his arm 
hurt so badly he could not sleep. She fed 
him. She carried him out in the sun in 
the mornings, and always took the best of 
care of him. I used to wonder if black folks 
loved their children, and if black children 
loved their father and mother. I know now 
that they do. 

Mamdi's arm had a bad infection below the 
elbow. It was as deep as the bones. There 
are two bones in your forearm, below the 



January 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



29 



elbow. It took three operations to cure 
Mamdi. That brave little fellow had three 
operations. The first one was not so bad. 
We cut down into the sore to let the pus 
out. He cried only a little bit that time and 
his mother stood by to pet him. After about 
three weeks of dressing this ugly sore, morn- 
ing and evening, we decided there was some 
dead bone that must be taken out. This 
time he cried a little more but hushed as 
soon as the instruments were taken away. 
It was not yet time to finish the operation 
and we could not get the dead bone out of 
the ulcer. The little patient waited another 
couple of weeks, always smiling and talking 
when we would look at him morning and 
evening. Finally one day the doctor told 
Mamdi's mother that we would have to give 
him some medicine to sleep and cut deep 
into his arm to see what the trouble was. 
She cried, same as your mother would, but 
said, " All right, whatever you think is best." 
He was put to sleep with medicine that 
makes people sleep whether they are sleepy 
or not, and a long deep cut was made. All 
of one of the bones was loose and dead. 
We gently lifted it out and put medicine in 
the hole. Mamdi's mother did not want to 
watch the operation. She stood out in 
another room and cried softly, but as soon 
as his arm was wrapped up she quickly came 
in and looked to see if he was still breath- 
ing. Mamdi got well fast. The new bone 
grew in its place. His arm began to look 



like the other one and soon after this picture 
was taken we left the bandage off and then 
one day we sent word to his father that 
he could come and carry his boy home. Of 
course he could walk a short distance but 
when he got tired he would use his father 
for a horse. 

These black children are very lovable. 
They are not spoiled. They do not talk 
back. As soon as a boy is big enough to 
walk he begins to herd the goats and sheep. 
Every morning there is a little boy about 
five years old who brings his herd of goats 
by the hospital. He has about twenty goats. 

This year there are some boys in school 
at Garkida from Mamdi's town. It is in 
Bornu, a place where the. Governor will not 
yet let us preach but we think soon we 
can go to Kujeffa and start a school and 
little hospital for such boys as Mamdi — yes, 
and his sisters. I'm thinking that when that 
time comes Mamdi will be the first boy to 
come to school. If we cannot go to his 
town in two years I think he will come to 
school in Garkida, for he will be old enough 
by that time. Then we guess that in about 
three more years Mamdi will want to take 
his church covenant and some day, who 
knows, he may be a school teacher or an 
assistant in the hospital. There are serious 
thoughts in his expression. Don't you love 
him? 



+ 4^4H--H-++-HHHH-*+HHH-++++ 4H^+++^+^ 



Greetings from One of Our African Brothers 

Lassa, October 9, 1929. 
My Friends, 

I want to greet you. How are you? I salute 3 r ou many times. How 
are you in the good work that you are doing? May God add his blessing to 
you that you may always live in peace and in health. 

I want to tell you some things about our school. In school we read from 
the Bible. We also learn arithmetic and writing. There is nothing I like better 
than school. School is pleasant indeed. It is sometimes hard to learn things 
in school but our Heavenly Father helps us. 

Will you greet those two big men [he means Brethren Bonsack and Emmert] 
for me who visited us some time ago? 

On one trip that I took I saw a train and an auto and an aeroplane. 

May God bless you. I also want to say that when you pray will you 
remember us. 

Bata. 



4.4.4.4.4.4.. 



.4.4.4.4.. 



•4.4.* 



30 



The Missionary Visitor 



January 
1930 



Our African Brothers Sing "J esus Loves Me" 



CLARA HARPER* 



Dear Juniors : 

My soul is praising God because of the 
way you boys and girls have been working 
this year to earn money for our black 
brothers in Africa. Jesus loves all the little 
children in the world and you are making 
it possible that many boys and girls can 
learn to know Jesus and sing with you 
"Jesus love me, the Bible tells me so." 

* Missionary. Returned to Africa Nov. 21 from her 
first furlough in America. 



They sing it in their own language like this : 

I, Isa hir ra, 
(pronounced, e esa, here ra) 

I, Isa hir ra, 

I, Isa hir ra, 

Tsa hira shang mbru. 

(Tsa here-a shang mbroo) 
May God bless you and help you all to 
keep the spirit of helping others. When I 
return to Africa I will tell the boys and girls 
how much you love them and what you 
are doing for them. 



\\cLW' 



A MISSIONARY WRITES TO HIS SON 

My dear Son : 

Once I wrote you about my neighbor, the 
bunny who lives near my 
§J$ compound. I have another 

y^",? ^ neighbor too. His name is 

/ . Xst Jikil. He looks like one 
of those baby deer in that 
picture mother got you. If 
I were to draw him I would draw him as 
he runs across our compound. He goes 
rapidly. He runs 
across the compound 
almost every morn- 
ing about seven 
o'clock. He goes to 
the river to drink 
and then he runs 
back to the bush. 
The boys just dance when they see him. 
They want me to shoot him. But I do not 
want to shoot my animal neighbors. I 
think we ought to be kind and good to 
pets. Do you not think so? 

Take good care of mother and be a brave 
boy. 

Your Father. 

STORY CONTEST 

Have you sent in your story of the pic- 
ture, "Our African Brothers"? The picture 
appeared in the December Missionary Vis- 
itor. If you do not have the picture write 
to the General Mission Board office for a 
copy of it. A prize will be awarded each 
contestant. 




Rules of the Contest 

1. Any boy or girl 13 years of age or under 
may enter the contest. 

2. The story should be ' from 100 to 300 
words. 

3. Your name, age, and address should be 
written plainly at the top of the paper. 

4. Write on one side of the paper only. 

5. Send to General Mission Board, Elgin, 111. 

6. Contest closes January 31, 1930. 

Prizes 
Every boy and girl sending a story will 
be_ awarded a set of foreign stamps and a 
coin from India. Several of the best stories 
will be printed in the Missionary Visitor or 
Our Boys and Girls. Also a picture of the 
contestant will be printed if it can be 
secured. In addition to the stamps and coin, 
contestants whose stories are printed will be 
presented with a fascinating game, " Across 
Africa with Livingstone." This game is 
played like parchisi. 

RACE RELATIONS SUNDAY, FEB. 9 

(Continued from Page 22) 

3. In some communities, ministers have 
preached special sermons and the local news- 
papers have been induced to give these ser- 
mons publicity. Some ministers have given 
a series of sermons, each treating of one 
race and its relation to others. — Commission 
on the Church and Race Relations^ 

Suggestions and References Available 

A packet of literature with helpful sug- 
gestions for different church groups is avail- 
able from The Commission on the Church 
and Race Relations, Federal Council of the 
Churches of Christ in America, 105 East 22nd 
Street, New York City, price five cents each. 
Included in the packet are Suggestions 
for the Minister, for the Sunday-school Su- 
perintendent, for programs in the Woman's 
Society, Suggestions for Interracial Activ- 
ities in the Young People's Society and 
Interracial Mass Meeting, also Suggestive 
Hymns and a detailed bibliography. 



Church of the Brethren Missionaries 

Supported in Whole or in Part by Funds Administered by the General Mission Board 
With the Year They Entered Service 



AMERICA 

Church of the Brethren In- 
dustrial School, Geer, Va. 

Bollinger, Amsey, and Flor- 
ence, 1922 

Finckh, Elsie, 1925 

Hersch, Orville, and Mabel, 
1925 

Kline, Alvin and Edna, 1919 

Knight, Henry, March, Va. 
1928 

Wampler, Nelie, 1922 
In Pastoral Service 

Bowman, Price, and Elsie, 
Bassett, Va., 1925 

Eby, E. H., and Emma, 2923 
St. Joseph Ave., St. Jo- 
seph, Mo., 1927 

Weiss, Lorell, 1188 Missouri 
Ave., Portland, Ore., 1927 

Haney, R. A., and Irva, 
Lonaconing, Md., 1925 

Rohrer, Ferdie, and Pearl 
Jefferson, N. C, 1927 

Ziegler, Edward and Ilda, 813 
E. Chilhowie Ave., Johnson 
City, Tenn., 1923 

Barr, Francis and Cora, Al- 
bany, Ore., 1928 
In Evangelistic Service 

Smith, Rev., and Mrs. S. Z., 
Sidney, Ohio 



SWEDEN 

Graybill, J. F., and Alice, 

Bergsgatan 45, M a 1 m 6, 

Sweden. 1911 
Norris, Glen M., and Lois, 

Spanhusvagen 38, Malmo, 

Sweden, 1929 

On Furlough 

Buckingham, Ida, Oakley, 
111., 1913 

CHINA 
Liao Chow, Shansi, China 

Hutchison, Anna, 1911 
Oberholtzer, I. E., and 

Elizabeth, 1916 
Senger, Nettie M., 1916 
Shock, Laura J., 1916 
Ulery, Ruth F., 1926 
Wampler, Ernest M., 1918, 

and Elizabeth, 1922 

Ping Ting Chow, Shansi, China 

Bright, J. Homer, and Min- 
nie, 1911 

Crumpacker, F. H., and Anna, 
1908 

Flory, Byron M., and Nora, 
1917 

Flory, Edna R., 1917 

Horning, Emma, 1908 

Metzger, Minerva, 1910 

Schaeffer, Mary, 1917 

Sollenberger, O. C, and 
Hazel, 1919 



Show Yang, Shansi, China 
Clapper. V. Grace, 1917 

Cripe, Winnie, 1911 

Heisey, Walter J., and Sue, 
1917 

Xeher, Minneva J., 1924 

Smith, W. Harlan, and Fran- 
ces, 1919 

Tai Yuan Fu, care of Y. M. 
C. A., Shansi, China 

Ikenberry, E. L., and Olivia, 

1922 
Myers, Minor M., and Sara, 

1919 

On Furlough 

* Brubaker, L. S., and Marie, 
331 S. 3d. Covina. Calif.. 1924 

Pollock, Myrtle, 520 E. Kan- 
sas Ave., McPherson, Kans., 
1917 

AFRICA 

Garkida, Nigeria, West Africa, 
via Jos 

Beahm, Wm. M., and Esther, 

1924 
Harper, Clara, 1926 
Heckman, Clarence C, and 

Lucile, 1924 
Robertson, Dr. Russell L., 

and Bertha C. 1927 
Rupel, Paul, and Naomi, 1929 
Schechter, Elnora, 1929 
Shisler, Sara, 1926 

Lassa, via Maiduguri, Nigeria, 
West Africa 

Kulp, H. Stover, 1922, and 
Christina, 1927 



On Furlough 

* Burke, Dr. Homer L., and 
Marguerite, 6317 Grand 
Ave., Chicago, 111., 1923 

Gibbel, Dr. J. Paul, and 
Verda, Girard, 111., 1926 

Helser, Albert D., 1922, and 
Lola, Thornville, Ohio, 1923 

Flohr, Earl W., and Ella, 
Vienna, Va., 1926 

INDIA 

Ahwa, Dangs, Surat Dist., 
India 

Garner, H. P., and Kathryn, 

1916 
Rover, B. Mary, 1913 
Anklesvar, Broach Dist., India 

Grisso, Lillian, 1917 

Lichty, D. J., 1902, and Anna, 

1912 
Long, I. S., and Erne, 1903 
Miller, Sadie J., 1903 
Moomaw, I. W., and Mabel, 

1923 
Woods, Beulah, 1924 



Bulsar, Surat Dist., India 

Blickenstaff, Lynn A., and 

Mary, 1920 
Blough, J. M., and Anna, 

1903 
Cottrell, Dr. A. R., and 

Laura, 1913 
Fox, Dr. J. W., and Besse, 

1929 
Mohler, Jennie, 1916 
Shumaker, Ida C, 1910 

Dahanu Read, Thana Dist., 
India 

Blickenstaff, Verna M., 1919 
Ebbert, Ella, 1917 
Metzger, Dr. Ida, 1925 
Roop, Ethel, 1926 
Swartz, Goldie E., 1916 

Jalalpor, Surat Dist., India 

Miller, Eliza B., 1900 

Vada, Thana Dist., India 

Brumbaugh, Anna B., 1919 
Ebey, Adam, and Alice, 1900 
Shull, Chalmer, and Mary, 
1919 

Palghar, Thana Dist., India 

Alley, Howard L., and Hat- 
tie, 1917 



Post Umalla, via Anklesvar, 
India 

Miller, Arthur S. B., and 

Jennie, 1919 
Widdowson, Olive, 1912 
Ziegler, Kathryn, 1908 

Vyara, via Surat, India 

Brooks, Harlan J., and Ruth, 

1924 

Wagoner, J. E., and Ellen, 

1919 
Mow, Anetta, 1917 

Burjor Bag, Lunsikui, Nav- 
sari, India 

Mow, Baxter M., and Anna, 
1923 



Woodstock School, Landour 
Musscorie, U. P., India 

Stoner, Susan L., 1927 

On Furlough 

Butterbaugh, Bertha, 3435 W. 

Van Buren St., Chicago, 

111., 1919 
Nickey, Dr. Barbara M., 

Monticello, Minn., 1915 
Kaylor, John I., 1911, and 

Ina, 1515 Second St., Bak- 

ersfield, Calif., 1921 
Shickel, Elsie N., 2211 Orange 

Ave. N. W., Roanoke, Va., 

1921 
W o 1 f, L. Mae, Franklin 

Grove, 111., 1922 



* Otherwise employed in America until conditions permit return to the field. 



Please Notice. — Postage on letters to our missionaries is 5c for each ounce or fraction 
thereof and 3c for each additional ounce or fraction. 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm>mmmmm^mmmmmwmm 

§ f 

| Three Things § 

& the Mission Office Can Do for You & 



/. Missiongrams ^ 

Monthly news letter is sent to Missionary Committees for use in presenting >Gfc 
missionary news to the Sunday-school. yg7 



2. Program Material 

State your need and we will furnish the best material we have. Most of 
this material is free. " Program Material for Primaries and Juniors," in 
booklet form, price 25 cents. 

3. Catalogue of Missionary, Religious 
Education and Stewardship Literature 

Missionary, stewardship, doctrinal, and religious education pamphlets and 
books, missionary plays, maps, posters and slides. Free. 



t&7 



rmtmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



mmmmmmmmm 



Execute Your Own Will 

You do this when you get one of our annuity bonds. It will mean a big 
saving to the Lord's treasury in court costs, and lawyers' and administrators' fees. 

But, if You Make a Will- 

Get good legal help that your will may be properly made. To remember 
missions in your will the following form of bequest is recommended : 

" I give and bequeath to the General Mission Board of the Church of the Brethren, 
a corporation of the State of Illinois', with its principal office at Elgin, Kane County, 

Illinois, its successors and assigns, forever, the sum of dollars 

($ ) to be used for the purpose of the said Board as specified in 

its charter." 

Write for our booklet which tells about annuity bonds and wills 

Gerxeral Mis-sioix Board 
Or THE CHUSCH OF THE BRETHREN ^ 

Elgiiv Illinois 



it«iWIifiiiiiI«I«l 



THE 

MISSIONARY 



Visitor 




Church of the D^ethren 



Vol* XXXII February, 1930 No. 2 



The Layman's Duty 

to Propagate His Religion 

{* A ^^ man who has a religion is bound 
V/\ to do one of two things with it — 
£ j^ change it or spread it. If it isn't 
true he must give it up. If it is 
true he must give it away. This is not the 
duty of ministers only. Religion is not an 
affair of a profession or of a caste. It is the 
business of every common man. There is no 
proxy religion. Each man has his own. If he 
hasn't, he has none. No other man can have 
it for him. And if he has his own, then he 
must propagate it, if it is true, or repudiate it, 
if it is false. 

— Robert E. Speer. 






34 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



What Price Civilization? 



THE answer to the leading question 
as to ' Why Civilization ?' is . . . 
to be found neither in the piling 
up of power, the ingenuity of machinery, 
and the efficiencies of organization; nor 
in the abstractions of philosophy and of 
passive faith in the beautiful, the good 
and the Divine. Civilization is justified 
only as it combines faith and works. 
Modern civilization is now sought 
throughout the world not only because 
it brings physical comfort, freedom from 
precarious dependence on daily or sea- 
sonal supplies of food, and larger con- 
trols of nature; it is also welcomed be- 
cause it brings a truer conception of 
human values and because the man fur- 
ther down has a better chance for life 
and for the fulness of life." — Thomas 
Jesse Jones, in Essentials of Civilization. 

ECULARISM is working out more 
definitely from year to year a new 
way of looking at the universe and at 
human nature which is in direct opposition 
to our fundamental convictions. It tries to 
understand nature as a wonderful mecha- 
nism on a colossal scale, ruled by eternal 
laws, which, when accurately understood, 
gives the strongest weapons into the hands 
of man for the subduing of its forces. Then 
man needs no God who has created, is ruling 
and is maintaining this universe. There is 
no place for him. Providence is a meaning- 
less phrase, morality consists in following 
the laws of the universe which are unethi- 
cal in their very nature. Conscience is a 
curious yet unreliable development of en- 
vironment and of behavior. Immortality 
is a vain hope. It is evident that such 
conception of the world and of human life 
is not only undermining in a dangerous way 
the life of the church but is eating out the 
vitals of the morality of the human race. 
The rapidly spreading demoralization of 
large masses is an evident sign that the soil 
is only too well prepared for this modern 
seed. . . . 

" The situation is particularly emphatic 
with regard to foreign missions. One has 
often the impression that the Christian 



church is similar to a man in danger of 
being frozen to death. Only the strongest 
exercise can bring him salvation; yet if he 
has overcome the danger he comes out all 
the stronger and more vigorous. Foreign 
missions are that vital exercise by which 
the American churches have to prove their 
will and their decision not to be overcome 
by an atheistic secularism but to come out 
victoriously from the desperate contest. 

" In view of the unique position of the 
United States as the paramount world 
power, this spiritual struggle has its impor- 
tance, not only for the churches at home, 
but also for the human race at large. To 
a great extent the victory of Christianity, 
the universal acknowledgment of the sov- 
ereignty of that God who revealed himself 
in Christ, the establishment of the Kingdom 
of God on earth, are dependent on the suc- 
cess or failure of the American churches in 
this deadly struggle against secularism." 
— Dr. Julius Richter, in The Missionary 
Herald, October, 1929. 

An Undermanned Field 

If the Moslem population of India received 
its proportionate quota of missionaries as 
compared with the Hindu population, nearly 
twelve hundred missionaries would be de- 
voting themselves to the Mohammedans, but 
out of 6,027 missionaries in this area only 
about 35 have specialized training for work 
among Moslems. At present there are only 
three or four men missionaries (and two of 
them well beyond the age of retirement) for 
over three and a half millions of Moslems 
in South India. Moslems in South India 
form six per cent of the whole population. 

The great importance of India for mission 
work among Moslems has been summarized 
by Dr. Zwemer : 

" It is the largest Moslem country in the 
world. It is the most active in the press, 
having 222 periodicals. It has 17 Moslem- 
spoken languages; it is the only country 
which has sent out Moslem missionaries; 
and, owing to British rule, Moslems can 
publicly confess Christ as in no other land." 
— Missionary Review of the World. 



February The Missionary Visitor 35 

1930 ' 

February Is Achievement Month 

Mission and Church Promotion Finance Facts 

The Authorized Conference Program Since the General Boards cooperate in 
The 1928 Annual Meeting at La Verne their approach to the congregations for 
authorized a general church program of funds the Achievement Offering suggested 
$363,000.00 for the year ending Feb. 28, 1930. f ° r February 16, is normally requested for 
This money is to be expended by the Missions and Church Promotion, and receipts 
General Boards in the following proportion : are placed in the Conference Budget fund. 
General Mission Board, $330,000.00 From this fund the Boards draw in the pro- 
Board of Religious Education, 21,500.00 portion as authorized by Conference. 

General Ministerial Board, 6,500.00 Because of the special appeal for mission 

General Education Board, 4 'Snnn funds this year, opportunity for designation 

American Bible Society, sUU.UU 

. is offered. The remittance blank on the 

$363,000.00 last page of this issue provides this privilege. 

The February Achievement Offering is Progress Being Made 

asked for the Conference Budget fund from ^ ^ tenth mQnth q{ ^ ^ e 

which the proportionate amount is turned to December 31 m% a tQtal of $210 ,748.99 was 

each agency. Designation of contributions . « , . . _, . 

& J . , ^ & , . ... , received from living donors. (This sum does 

to any particular Board is the privilege ot . , A . . , , . ., , 

y F not include the pledges from individuals to- 

the donor. ^ ward the challenge side of the deficit pay _ 

The Mission Deficit *.\ t\ • ax. j- i.u 

_ . ,,. . ^ , . , . ,. .. , ment.) During the corresponding ten months 

The General Mission Board had a deficit of . b 

*~-,*^ ,r , - -.^n r~ • , £ - A i of the previous year ending Dec. 31, 1928, a 

$75,000 on March 1, 1929. This deficit has / Mn „ 1QC7 . , ' .. ' 

y ' . . , , . total of $202,218.87 was received. The differ- 

been accumulating for several years because * oc , nn 

. ,. ence between these two sums, $8,530.12, rep- 

the program required expenditures greater . _ 

F , & . M . . , J • t_ resents the progress made toward paving off 

than the receipts which were expected but ^ 7 r ^ . t , r . 

K $37,o00.00, the congregational share of the 

not realized. , r •. 

The continued deficit has had a damaging 

effect on the Lord's work. Certain discour- Reasons for Optimism 

agements have resulted. Spiritual and busi- The challenge has been effective only in 

ness minded men and women took steps to the recent months. Both the Thanksgiving 

challenge the church to pay off this deficit. and Christmas offering responses exceed last 

Paying the Deficit year - The s P ecial effort has been slowly but 

A plan was arranged by which individuals surel y becoming known by the membership 

would pay half of the $75,000 if the con- generally. Many people are praying and 

gregations would pay the other half. ^™g in an earnest manner. Congregations 

The churches can pay the half of the are callm S councils of their able members, 

deficit only after they have provided as Thinking members realize there is too much 

much as last year's giving. Otherwise the at stake t0 P ermit failure in this most worthy 

old deficit would be paid and a new one enterprise of the church. 

would accrue. Optimism No Substitute for Work 

A number of individuals gladly and gener- ^ r ,. ,. , t . , 

& J b . , The concern of those directly in touch 

ously contributed large sums to start a fund ... ., . . , , , 

' . , r , , r r . , _ . „ with the movement is not to be concealed. 

to provide for half of the deficit, rrogress „ ... . , .. . . c :i1 

. , . , .,,.., Failure could easily take place. Success will 

is being made with this fund. . , ^, . « _ ., 

& not be easy. The program is not large if 

The February Offering shared by all congregations. Our optimism 

Because February ends the business year grows out of a conviction that practically 

for the General Boards the annual appeal all congregations are going to take part. 

is made for generous contributions to put The non-participation of only a few is very 

the financial affairs in good shape to begin certain to cause defeat. Let every congre- 

the new year. There should be a balance gation give, and give an increase over last 

instead of a deficit. year. 



36 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



The Women Continue Their Help 

Remittances from Women's Organizations, 
largely Aid Societies, continue to come in 
each day at the Mission rooms. 

Among the largest remittances to be re- 
ceived from any Society is Waterloo with 
a $200.00 contribution. The smaller remit- 
tances from the smaller congregations are 
appreciated also, and altogether are helping 
a great deal in meeting the Mission Chal- 
lenge. 

An Aid Society in the East, sending a 
check for twenty-five dollars, regretted that 
they could not do more, and added, " We 
hope to do something definite toward this 
work before February 28." 

Two sisters sent along with their gift of 
ten dollars, an earnest hope that the Mission 
Challenge Fund would go over the top. 

Predict Meeting the Mission 
Challenge 

A. M. Horst, District Field Man for 
Middle Maryland, gives his judgment that 
the congregations of Middle Maryland are 
well acquainted with the mission challenge 
and are earnestly trying to do their part. 
He thinks a fifteen per cent increase in 
giving throughout the District over the 
giving of a year ago will be recorded by 
February 28, 1930. As it is seldom possible 
to secure a 100 per cent response from every 
individual and every church, many congre- 
gations will need to make more than a 
fifteen per cent increase. 

A Small Boy's Nickel 

The treasurer of a church in sending a 
remittance for $18.05 begs pardon for the 
odd amount. He says the nickel was 
brought to him by a very small child to 
be sent with the mission offering. We 
remember the story of the lad whose offer- 
ing was only five small loaves and two 
fishes and how this gift was magnified when 
it was touched with the blessing of our 
Lord. The five cents from the little lad 
went into the World-Wide Mission Fund 
from which the workers in India, China, 
Africa and the Home Fields draw. It is 
quite possible this five cents will be the 
means of accomplishing some great good. 



This Brother Would Give a Good 
Part of a Million 

Please find check for $20, which I would 
like to have put with the mission money for 
the China mission. I believe China presents 
to us a great opportunity to do mission 
work. If we fail to embrace it the people 
will sink back to idolatry. I wish I had a 
million dollars to give to you right now. 

The Christian Movement in China 

The present communicant membership of 
the Christian churches in China, according 
to estimates put forth by The Chinese Re- 
corder, is 446,631. The figures are not set 
forth as being precise; an allowance of ten 
per cent either up or down might prove to 
be called for. In 1922 the figure stood at 
402,539. 

Rating the Missionary Giving 

The incoming mail at the Elgin head- 
quarters is enough to cause interest if not 
real excitement, during the days when mis- 
sionary receipts are at their highest. On 
Jan. 3 there were one hundred fifty remit- 
tances. These represented Christmas offer- 
ings. Some were for very generous amounts. 
They showed that the members of congre- 
gations had dug down into their pockets 
and brought out the big money. Other re- 
mittances, while gratefully received, seemed 
as if the hat had been passed around and 
collected whatever small amounts were easily 
available. The Mission Board is appreciative 
of all cooperation and the small offerings 
given in an earnest spirit are bound to be 
a help. What should be said here is this, 
if this challenge to pay off the deficit is 
to be met, more than the loose coins that 
just happen to be in our pockets will be 
necessary in the February offerings. Check 
books will have to come into use. Many 
will need to be written with three figures 
to the left of the decimal point. 

Adventuring in Sharing 

A brother in northern California, feeling 
he wanted to be a good steward and share 
what he has with the people of India, sub- 
scribed for a $100 share. Last week his $40 
check completing the first year's payment 
was received by the General Mission Board. 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



37 



He says this venture is the tithe from the 
proceeds from one thousand hens. It is 
quite likely that the fowls in the poultry 
yard on many farms are having a part in 
the mission program. 

Registration of Mission Schools — 

An Important Question Among 

Missionaries 

" To register or not to register," is the 
question that is uppermost in the minds 
of the educational missionaries of China 
today. In order to maintain her spirit of 
nationalism, China is making a strenuous 
effort to keep within state control the edu- 
cation of her young. The new government 
is now endeavoring to enforce the registra- 
tion of all schools, and an unregistered 
school is not recognized by the state nor 
are diplomas given to pupils who have been 
graduated in such schools. It is in the 
schools that we come in contact with the 
young, and it was our hope that by religious 
instruction in the schools and by secular 
instruction in a Christian atmosphere, we 
might gather together the materials for lay- 
ing the foundation of the Christian church 
in China. Under the new regime, the regis- 
tration of our schools means no religious 
instruction, no worship, and no religious 
exercises of any sort in connection with the 
school program. Shall we close our doors 
and concentrate all of our forces in direct 
evangelistic work, or shall we continue our 
schools without religious instruction, depend- 
ing upon Christian " attitude " and " atmos- 
phere " to finish the work we have begun? 
Will you help us to pray it through? 

Bible Institute in India 

A letter from Brother J. E. Wagoner tells 
of the Bible Institute at Vyara. It was held 
at the bungalow of Brother and Sister 
Harlan J. Brooks. Brother Brooks, Jive 
Hira, one of the India Brethren, and Brother 
Wagoner, were the three instructors. Broth- 
er Wagoner, in his typical way, suggested 
that he was not sure how much the students 
would learn, but he was sure the three 
teachers would learn a great deal. It is 
quite certain that when teachers are in such 
a good mood to learn, their pupils will 
also make new discoveries of truth. 

It was stated that Brother J. M. Blough 
would come from Bulsar to engage in the 
Vyara love feast. 



THE MISSIONARY VISITOR 

Published Monthly by the Church of the 
Brethren through her General Mission Board. 
H. Spenser Minnich, Editor 
Ada Miller, Assistant Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION TERMS 

THE SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS ONE DOLLAR 
PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH dona- 
tion of four dollars or more to the General Mission 
Board, either direct or through any congregational 
collection, provided the four dollars or more are 
given by one individual and in no way combined 
with another's gift. Different members of the same 
family may each give four dollars or more and 
extra subscriptions, thus secured, may upon request 
be sent to persons who they know will be interested 
in reading the Visitor. NO VISITOR SUBSCRIP- 
TIONS ARE ENTERED UNLESS REQUESTED. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription 
terms do not include a subscription for every four 
dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation 
of four dollars or more, no matter how large the 
donation. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions 
and make remittances payable to GENERAL MIS- 
SION BOARD, 22 S. STATE ST., ELGIN, ILL. 

Entered as second class matter at the postoffice 
at Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 

Membership 
OTHO WINGER. North Manchester, Ind., 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, McPherson, Kans., 1908-1934. 
H. H. NYE. Elizabethtown, Pa., 1923-1932. 
J. B. EMMERT, La Verne, Calif., 1924-1931. 
LEVI GARST, Salem, Va., R. R. 1, 1925-1930. 
J. K. MILLER, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1928-1933. 
L. C. MOOMAW. Roanoke, Va., R. R. 2, 1928-1932. 

Officers 

OTHO WINGER. President, 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, Vice-President, 1908-1934. 
CHARLES D. BONSACK, General Secretary, 1921.« 
H. SPENSER MINNICH, Assistant Secretary and 

Editor Missionary Visitor, 1918. 
M. R. ZIGLER. Home Mission Secretary, 1919. 
CLYDE M. CULP, Treasurer, 1920. 



Note. — The bold type date indicates the year when 
Board Members were first elected, the other date the 
year when Board Members' terms expire. 

•Although Bro. Bonsack was not elected secretary 
until 1921 he has been connected with the Board 
since 1906. 



Heart Throbs in This Contribution 

In balancing our tenth box for the year, 
my wife and I found we were $50.00 short. 
This explains the enclosed check. Please 
credit our congregation. 

Since, on account of health conditions, we 
cannot go to the Mission field as we had 
once hoped, we are glad we can help in a 
small way from time to time. We hope 
to give more toward the close of the year 
for the Kingdom's advancement. 

A Pennsylvania Brother. 



38 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



Theological Professors Confer on World Situation 



SELDOM have one hundred professors 
in the theological seminaries of the 
United States and Canada come to- 
gether under more significant auspices than 
at the Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, 
N. J., when they met on November 29 to 
December 1 to consider their responsibility 
in connection with the present world situa- 
tion and the opportunity it presents to the 
Christian Church. The conference was held 
under the chairmanship of Dean Luther A. 
Weigle, of the Yale Divinity School, Chair- 
man of the Association of Theological Pro- 
fessors. Cooperating in the arrangements 
was the International Missionary Council. 

The personnel in attendance ranged all the 
way from the most conservative to those 
who are generally regarded as representing 
the more radical point of view. The very 
first hour of the first session revealed a 
wide chasm, when Professor Edward Scrib- 
ner Ames of the University of Chicago pre- 
sented the point of view of humanism and 
met a sharp rejoinder from Professor 
Archibald T. Robertson of the Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary at Louisville. 
Close on the heels of this discussion came 
a paper by Professor Henry N. Wieman, of 
the Divinity School of the University of 
Chicago, who urged religious leaders to 
hold their points of view more tentatively, 
after the fashion of the scientists, a position 
which also met with no little challenge. 
When the first day ended with a presentation 
of present ethical and social problems by 
Bishop Francis J. McConnell and Professor 
Reinhold Niebuhr, one wondered whether it 
would ever be possible to discover any unity 
whatever within the group. 

When, however, on the second day Dr. 
John R. Mott gave a masterful review of 
the present world situation, as he had found 
it especially in the countries of Asia on his 
recent trip around the world, and outlined 
the opportunity of the churches in the face 
of such a situation, a remarkable change 
of atmosphere took place. It was discovered 
that beneath such differences as had ap- 
peared on the first day there was a deep 
underlying spiritual unity and a common 
purpose to bring all of life under the control 
of Christ. As a result, the ensuing discus- 
sions on the kind of an apologetic needed 



for today and on changes in the theological 
curriculum which would make the seminaries 
more effective agents in fulfilling the world 
mission of the Church, moved forward with 
increasing momentum and much practical 
stimulus. 

The conference was unique in having no 
findings, it having been agreed in advance 
that its purpose would be fulfilled in the 
stimulus afforded to each of the participants. 
— News Service, Federal Council of Churches. 

Ramsay MacDonald's Apprecia- 
tion of the Missionary 

In view of the visit of J. Ramsay Mac- 
Donald, the Prime Minister of Great Britain, 
to this country, his glowing tribute to the 
work of the missionaries in Africa has a 
special timeliness. Speaking at the Congo 
Jubilee Exhibition, he said: 

" As soon ^s the missionary appears, slav- 
ery is doomed. I do not say g that it is 
doomed in twenty-four hours ; but I do say 
that the presence of the missionary has this 
effect, explain it as you may, that from the 
moment he becomes a part of the atmosphere 
of a race, slavery dwindles and education 
begins. Men whose lives have been long 
lived in the atmosphere of ignorant supersti- 
tion and mortal terror are enabled to lift up 
their heads and to discover that there is 
something giving them power, enabling them 
to walk about with heads uplifted, obedient 
to the law, but not victims of the law, 
enabling them not only to look out on the 
world but within themselves. There begins 
responsible care, which at last emerges into 
a conception of the responsibilities of use- 
fulness, lending them the idea of responsi- 
bility to the universe. I think the missionary 
requires no further justification. We, who 
have been called to the secular affairs of 
life rather than the spiritual, will never fail 
to be grateful, I hope, to the missionaries 
who have carried into effect the gospel of 
human justice as well as of spiritual power." 

"The way to God is by the road of men. 
Find thy far heaven in near humanity! 
Love the seen neighbor as thyself ! Thereby 
Thou lovest him unseen who is thy all !" 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



39 



Getting Acquainted with Dahanu Mission Hospital 



DR. IDA METZGER* 



DO you remember how different you 
felt toward that friend of yours when 
you first met, before you ever 
thought a close friendship would be formed? 
Yes, an introduction is one thing, but a real 
acquaintanceship is quite another. 

More than three years ago Dahanu Mis- 
sion Hospital was introduced to the people 
of this community. That introduction cere- 
mony lasted only a short time, but getting 
acquainted was a much longer process. 
Medical mission work was not new here at 
Dahanu, for the dispensary had long been 
serving the people, but in the early days of 
the dispensary people had been afraid of 
taking the medicines — they were afraid the 
water contained in the mixtures would 
defile them. Now they have become accus- 
tomed to taking medicines from here. But 
to be treated as an out-patient was a very 
different matter from coming into the hos- 
pital and being treated there for a number 
of days. Both fear and prejudice filled the 
hearts of many, for they were not eager 
to see any expansion of the Christian ac- 
tivities. In order to build the hospital more 
land was needed and it was with consid- 
erable difficulty that this was purchased. 

Then Dahanu Mission Hospital became a 
reality. Patients began coming, not many at 
first, for even those who were proud to 
have the institution in their midst were 
loathe to send members of their families to 
it for treatment. They said, " People will 
talk much against us and say, 'Why do 
you send your relatives to the hospital? 
Why will you not care for them in your 
home?'" That was no idle prediction, for 
there was much talk about those who came 
as patients. Many of those first ones who 
came did so only after a great deal of per- 
suasion on the part of the doctors. It is very 
gratifying to see how many come voluntarily 
now and ask for admission. At first the 
higher castes, being more educated, were 
the ones who came ; it was very difficult to 
interest the lower castes. Usually when they 
did come it was not a matter of choice, but 
because the landlord to whom they were 



Medical Missionary to India. 



bound, sent them. Now they, too, are com- 
ing voluntarily. 

It took considerable courage to face the 
criticism of one's fellow caste people, as 
many of the early patients had to do. One 
of those critics was Gangabai, the woman 
of authority in one of the wealthy and in- 
fluential families of Dahanu. She attended 
a meeting held on the mission compound, a 
meeting to which our Christian women and 
Hindu women and girls were invited, to 
hear a lecture given by one of the nurses 
on the subject, " Infant foods and their 
preparation." At the close of the lecture 
and demonstration the nurse opened the 
meeting for questions and discussion. Gang- 
abai apparently had nothing to say on the 
subject, but she seized the opportunity to 
make a lengthy speech in behalf of the 
hospital. She said that when Nirmalabai, 
one of the women of her caste, came to the 
hospital for her confinement, the people 
talked much about it, and she was one of 
them. She went on, "And now I am here 
with two of the women of my household in 
the hospital." Not only has she brought 
those of her own household but she has 
been influential in bringing others. 

One day a young man, whose wife and 
sister had been treated here, stated that 
the hospital was meaning much to the com- 
munity and was doing much good. The 
reply was, " Some do not get well, but 
through the blessing of God many have been 
healed here." He said, " Yes, some do not 
get well, but even if the patient dies we 
believe the treatment was good." 

On a bright May morning two motor 
trucks, loaded with passengers, collided. 
Nine persons were badly injured and were 
rushed to the hospital; they were a ghastly 
sight when they arrived with cut faces and 
scalps, and blood-stained clothing. It seemed 
only a few minutes until dozens of people 
were hurrying to the compound; some were 
relatives and friends of the injured, some 
were officials, some were only curious on- 
lookers. The dispensary verandas were 
blocked with people. Usually it is almost 
impossible to maintain order in an excited 
Indian crowd but these people grasped the 



40 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



seriousness of the situation and very quickly 
quieted down and obeyed orders. It was a 
busy morning for the doctor and nurses; 
the doors were closed to all other cases 
and the injured ones were made as comforta- 
ble as possible. It was the kind of work 
that one is not anxious to do, knowing that 
a lawsuit is almost sure to follow and one 
must go to court as a witness. But the 
service rendered in this case has been to the 
glory of God. The news of the accident and 
the fact that the injured ones were taken 



care of in the Mission Hospital spread all 
over the community and has been the means 
of winning friends for the work here. 

" What God hath wrought !" we apply to 
all the good that has been done in this in- 
stitution. Each member of the staff is re- 
minded repeatedly that this is the Lord's 
work and whatever service is rendered here 
is service rendered to him, whatever is 
accomplished here is through his power, and 
if there is anything for which to rejoice 
or glory, the glory belongs to him. 



Your Money Is Curing Leprosy 

RUSSELL L. ROBERTSON, M. D.* 



WHAT! the Church of the Brethren 
doing leprosy work? That fact is 
more significant than one thinks 
at first. All of us have read of leprosy and 
know of its dreadful nature. We have seen 
pictures of lepers and have been filled with 
pity for one fleeting moment while brought 
face to face with their pictures or their 
stories. 

Now the situation is brought closer to us. 
They are among us ; we are associating with 
them daily. The problem is exactly as if 
some one should desert an infant on your 
front doorstep during the night and you 
should find the helpless dependent creature 
in the morning. You would not leave it in 
the cold or the heat for one minute after 
you saw it. 

All right, here we are, you and I, in 
Nigeria, Africa, in the midst of thousands 
of lepers and they have no other help in 
sight. Actual figures do not lie. Nigeria 
harbors 90,000 lepers. There are eighteen 
missionary doctors in Nigeria. The Church 
of the Brethren has two doctors just now. 
We are responsible for one-ninth of them, or 
10,000. 

Eventually, the relief of lepers lies wholly 
in the hands of social agencies and the 
medical department of missions. Success is 
denied the government doctor because of 
his lack of sympathy and the lack of Christ 
in his heart. Dr. Sir Leonard Rogers says, 
" The organization of the great humanitarian 
work of caring for the leper is largely in 
the hands of Christian missions of the 



Medical Missionary to Africa. 



various denominations." Wide-awake mis- 
sions grasp at this, another opportunity, 
another point of contact as a quick and easy 
means of saving folks — body and soul. 

Need I appeal to your interest and your 
sympathy more than this? "A leper? How 
terribly sad !" So would everyone say if 
he heard that a friend had contracted this 
awful disease. Leprosy devitalizes by stages, 
for it has been found that, on the average, 
a person suffering from this disease lives 
for fourteen years after being first affected. 
Moreover, consider the dire results, and you 
will agree that it would be indeed sad to 
see a friend in such a case. Think of the 
disfiguration of face that often follows, the 
mutilation of hands and feet, the loss of 
useful employment, being turned out by 
one's friends, the ostracism of one's ac- 
quaintances. These are some of the dis- 
abilities which have been experienced by 
almost all lepers everywhere, through the 
ages. In some places they suffer worse from 
traditional inhumane customs. In parts of 
British territories in Africa it is not by any 
means unknown today for an old, helpless, 
decrepit leper to be turned out into the 
forest to be devoured by the wild beasts. 
Who wants to be worried with him? No 
one. Then out let him go ! 

What can we do? That is not the ques- 
tion. The question is how much can we do? 
We are already doing something. The work 
is begun. We are attempting great things 
and expecting great results. The results 
depend on our money, energy, faith and 
prayer. We must necessarily begin on a 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



41 



small scale, for several reasons : lack of 
equipment and housing facilities for the 
lepers; lack of money; lack of experience 
in handling and treating large crowds of 
lepers; and partly because of lack of willing 
lepers. That sounds queer, but I will explain 
further. These poor lepers cannot believe 
that the disease can be cured. All their 
medicines have failed and they have never 
seen a case cured. They believe a thing 
is impossible if they have never seen it 
accomplished. Also the native healers are 
spreading much propaganda against our 
promises to cure them. They know that if 
we cure one leper the people will trust us 
to treat anything and their practices are 
ruined. If that prejudice is once wiped out 
and a little confidence established we will 
be overwhelmed with lepers. Mr. McDonald 
in southern Nigeria began treating lepers 
about eighteen months ago, in a more ad- 
vanced and civilized part of Africa. That 
is where the people have seen the white 
man and the accomplishments of western 
ideas for a much longer time. Today he is 
treating over one thousand lepers. We'll 
admit that we could not care for that many 
just now, but we hope to grow with our 
plans and with the number of applicants for 
help. 

We are treating thirteen regularly now 
and expect the number to always be in- 
creasing. Yet this season they are living 



in grass huts on a corner of the hospital 
plat and have their farms near by. We are 
getting a large tract of land donated by the 
government, two miles from the mission 
compound, where we already have a good 
well dug, shade trees planted, and fruit trees 
started, including bananas. Before the rains 
are over we expect to have a small hospital 
building on this grant of land and then 
the lepers can begin to build their own 
more substantial mud huts, under strict 
supervision. 

Those in the hospital now are very happy. 
They see their spots disappearing; they feel 
strength returning to their bodies; they see 
health and happiness in the near future; 
they see the prospect of returning to their 
homes cured and life expectancy extended; 
and some of them are finding life beyond 
the grave, or Life Eternal. Some of them 
will be here one year and some four or five 
years until cured, depending on the stage at 
which they come to us. The man in the 
picture holding out his hands cannot have 
his fingers replaced but the process will be 
stopped and he can expect to live many 
years yet. Look at the three children in 
the other picture — all from one family. The 
boy on the right is a far advanced case but 
his sister in the middle is just beginning 
to show signs of the awful disease. We'll 
write more on these cases later. 




AFRICAN WOMEN, friends of Mrs. Kulp at Lassa. They are responding to Christian 
teaching. 



42 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



Work and Value of the China Christian Council 

NETTIE MABELLE SENGER* 



THERE has been an effort for a num- 
ber of years to bring about a unity 
of feeling in all the churches of 
China. To have this unity, a number of 
fundamental problems must be worked out 
together, every church helping every other 
church with its experience and leadership. 
The present central body to accomplish this 
great task is the National Christian Council 
with its headquarters in Shanghai. 

It has as its working body a group of 
secretaries who are constantly on the job. 
There are field secretaries who spend most 
of their time among the churches, and those 
in the office who do executive work, corre- 
spondence and writing. Other help is in- 
vited for short periods as -needed from the 
Christian and missionary groups. Those who 
go out see conditions in the field, learn of 
problems confronting the church, hold re- 
treats and conferences where they are 
invited, and help the church's leaders into 
a greater spiritual life. Any other need is 
supplied as it arises. In such meetings and 
retreats they present new subjects involv- 
ing fundamental principles to be thought 
about and worked out by the local church 
according to local needs. Thus they help 
the local churches to know how to proceed 
with what they already know of Christ and 
show them how to get more. The yearly 
conference which meets in Shanghai is to 
discuss just such problems. In this meeting 
delegates from many centers are present 
(this year our delegate was Bro. Yin) and 
carry inspiration with new ideas back to 
their churches in all quarters. 

They help the many churches in church 
organization, in getting family worship es- 
tablished, giving them an order of procedure 
and a spiritual content. Any need may be 
presented to them to help with a solution. 
They are the center and clearing house 
for all general subjects, such as Christian- 
izing Chinese festivals and adjusting them 
in the Christian program, Christianizing eco- 
nomic relations, teaching on public health, 
and agricultural training for the church 
people. They see what literature is needed 



* Missionary to China. 



for all classes and urge those who can do 
it to prepare such literature. There is not 
the abundance of good easy reading for 
Christians here as there is at home. It must 
all be prepared. This council helps to do 
it. They learn of those leaders over the 
country who are able to help in this kind 
of work and help them find a place to be 
more valuable to the church. 

The personnel of the Council is mostly 
Chinese and represents the central working 
body of the church in China. The printed 
matter they put out is suggestive of the 
problems in the church and stimulates think- 
ing. They also report work that is being 
done which helps other people to be more 
active in their work. Thus a public senti- 
ment is stimulated and the church's knowl- 
edge is broadened. This organization binds 
the church together under one name and 
establishes a uniformity of thinking and 
practice on all fundamental subjects, many 
of which are peculiar to China because they 
pertain to her background. The idea is to 
help the church to grow indigenous, and 
profit by the good China already has. It 
does for the church here much the same 
as our Board and Annual Meeting do for 
our own church at home, and brings a unity 
of feeling which could not otherwise be 
accomplished. 

As the church is being established this 
Council is valuable in helping the groups 
in their changing interests to use rules and 
laws, helps it work them out together as 
one large body, and helps the leaders to 
do their part more intelligently. They are 
doing much to bring about a new public 
opinion concerning religion and morals. 
They are doing not a little to give China's 
Christian leaders a new vision of the 
abundant life Christ holds out to them, and 
urges them to strive toward the goal in- 
telligently. They are pleading with the 
church leadership to learn by doing, to 
preach by living, and to bring great teach- 
ing out of ordinary familiar things as Jesus 
did. 

They have no authority to compel a 
church to do as they wish. They use all 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



43 



their powers to advise and instruct. They 
are not seeking for obedience, they are 
seeking for spiritual fruits. They receive 
any question gladly, and carefully give at- 
tention to the answer. They never give 
orders as to what must be practiced. They 
have no authority except as advisers. They 
endeavor to give the advice so wisely and 
sympathetically that it cannot but be con- 
sidered. Thus the people get help, in any 
case, because they are stimulated to think 
out their own solution according to their 
local needs. The Council's desire is to have 
the church become indigenous, deeply spirit- 
ual with a Chinese setting rather than for- 
eign in the atmosphere peculiar to China's 
background; and have the new life grow 
out of the old as the new ear of corn comes 
out of the old, like it in appearance and yet 
not the same for it is new. They are 
working for a new China, a new society 
built after the pattern of Christ and built 



on his life. They know China's only hope 
is in Christ. They are spending every effort 
to bring all of China to realize it as they 
do. The secretaries count no travel too 
hard for them, and no place is too remote 
for them to go. One secretary, after a long 
trip and much delay, reached her place 
of meeting after ten o'clock in the evening. 
The audience was still waiting for her. She 
went immediately to the meeting and they 
did not dismiss until midnight because the 
people wanted more of the good she had 
to give ; the next day she had to go on 
to another place. In relating the incident 
the thing uppermost in her mind was the 
interest of the people rather than her own 
hardship. With a group of leaders like this 
to stimulate the church here it must pro- 
gress. All over China they carry a spirit 
of optimism that is healthy for the strug- 
gling churches. In your prayers for China 
remember this Council. 



A Letter to Ruth. No. 1 1 



Ping Ting Chou, Shansi, China. 
Sept., 1929. 
My dear Ruth: 

The rains are over now and the beau- 
tiful autumn days are upon us. The farmers 
are busy gathering the crops and threshing 
the grain. The same methods for both are 
as they have been for two thousand years, 
and often are most picturesque. One can 
see the gleaners going over the fields gath- 
ering the dropped heads of millet or corn 
and putting them into sacks, or the women 
gathering it in their aprons. These are 
always poor people and it is understood that 
they have the right to get what they can 
find after the reapers have gathered the 
standing grain. I have seen women and 
children even gathering the grains of wheat 
that had fallen from the heads, and while 
this was a slow, tedious piece of work, the 
wheat must have added a delicious flavor 
to their food for poor people seldom have 
the joy of tasting wheat flour. And my heart 
has just a pang of hurt when Calvin's dog, 
Cricket, gets a slice of wheat bread and 
then some of these people say, "Truly that 
dog has reached dog heaven for it gets to 
eat white flour." It sort'a hurts my con- 
science, and I feel things are not proportioned 



right in this great land for there are too 
many poor people who merely exist in life 
without much hope of anything better in 
this life or the life to come. You do not 
know what poverty is at home for you 
seldom see it as one does in a land like 
this, but we rejoice that there are scattered 
here and there a very small number of 
consecrated hearts who have a vision of 
the uplift of their people and are preparing 
themselves for the stupendous task. 

My heart was touched not many days ago 
when a fine young man just out of High 
School told me of his plans and purposes 
for his life. He is twenty-four years old 
and if he had had opportunity would have 
been through his High School long ago. He 
is now leaving for Peking where he is 
entering Yen Chihg University. He was 
involved in some very radical movements 
when connected with our school. When 
the school found it necessary to close and 
send the boys away, this lad went to his 
far-away village home. He carried a Bible 
with him. While in school he spurned it 
and felt it nothing but a book of super- 
stition, but he thought he would read more 
of it while at home. When he was away 
from his former companions and read and 



44 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



perused the good Book he was moved and 
touched that it did have a great message 
for mankind, and for him. He had time to 
meditate and finally to pray, and then he 
at last began to act. The wife to whom 
he had been married when quite young 
and whom he did not love but with whom he 
was always quarreling, now began to get 
the first consideration. He decided to try 
to love her and not despise her because she 
was ignorant for he began to realize that 
it was no fault of hers that she could not 
read. He began to treat her differently and 
to teach her to read. He found her quite 
bright. She made good progress and soon 
they were very happy together. Rich 
recompense was his in joy and satisfaction 
as he followed step by step the guidance 
of a better spirit. The ignorance of his 
fellow-villagers touched him and he wanted 
to do something for them. He went about 
opening a night school, teaching the men 
and boys to read. In this he was helped 
by some of the county officials when they 
saw his purpose. He also spoke for his 
Master as opportunity afforded and when 
school time came he went far away to 
attend. We had heard of the good work 
of this young man and felt deep joy that 
he was now our own brother. I wish you 
might have seen this strong young man with 
such a clean face and set purpose. He said 
to me, " My one ambition is to finish my 
college work and then go back to my peo- 
ple and spend my life for their betterment. 
They are poor and have never had a chance 
and I would be as they are were it not for 
the grace of God which has come into my 
life. I thank God again and again for his 
goodness to me and I want my people to 
share this joy with me. Unless some one 
goes to them they will never know." I 
was moved with his earnestness and sin- 
cerity and urged him to prepare for tempta- 
tions which were sure to come to lure him 
into other things and away from the desires 
which were clinging to his heart. We knew 
of his brilliant mind which might turn him 
away from his present hopes, for he was one 
of eight students from nine provinces who 
passed all the subjects in the entrance ex- 
aminations. He said, " I consider myself 
very fortunate." And we felt proud of " our 
boy." He was happy to tell us that his 



wife could now write letters to him and 
when I asked him where she went to school 
(I already knew of his teaching her but he 
did not know that I did) he proudly said, 
" I taught her myself." We admired him 
all the more then for we knew it was break- 
ing away from old bound customs for a 
husband to condescend to pay any attention 
to a wife. And as the young man left us 
for the big city of Peking with all its 
temptations and enticing allurements, our 
prayers went with him that he might be 
kept from the power of them all and that 
his heart might be as clean and steadfast 
of purpose as it was that evening. 

We were happy to see five of our young 
people leave for college work, four boys 
and one girl. Three of these young people 
are taking the Liberal Arts course, one 
medical, and one seminary. All have good 
records as worthy Christian students. I was 
impressed with the story of the young man 
entering upon his preparation for the min- 
istry. He comes of a good family, though 
poor. His father has been one of our most 
successful evangelists. This lad knows what 
it means to struggle through school and go 
hungry in order to get an education. When 
we sat together talking over his hopes for 
the church I did not hint to him of things 
which were told me by a friend of his, 
things which the young man would not 
venture to disclose and which I am sure 
he holds sacred in the sanctuary of his soul. 
He never spoke of the many meals he never 
tasted but went to sleep hungry so as to save 
more for his mother and small sisters at 
home who he feared were not having 
enough to eat. He did tell though of how 
he went through high school without buy- 
ing a book, and when I asked him how he 
ever did it he said : " I had not the money 
to buy books but I listened carefully to 
every lesson, and if I could borrow a book 
I did so. There were times during the 
first year when boys would not sit by me 
because of my poor clothing, but I tried 
not to notice it and in time when I could 
work problems which they could not they 
began coming to me for assistance, which I 
was always glad to give, and in turn they 
would loan me books. So I went through 
my four years without buying books." You 
know it takes a strong spirit to meet all 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



45 



the difficulties that this young man had to 
meet. Many a young person would have 
given up in despair and felt hopeless but 
he hung on until he received his diploma. 
He taught awhile and then was honored by 
having the church recommend him for a 
grant-in-aid to prepare for the ministry. We 
saw him go away to a distant place for his 
preparation. All these young people have 
visions and dreams for a life of service 
among their people, and our hearts rejoice 
for their opportunities and for the future of 
the church as they come back and take 
responsibilities now resting on other shoul- 



ders. If there was ever a worth-while in- 
vestment it is training lives who are pre- 
paring to make a nation better, to lighten 
the burdens of the people, to bring joy 
where there is sorrow, light where there is 
darkness and hope where there is despair. 
We rejoice in these " children " of ours who 
have tasted of the love of Christ. All asked 
that our prayers follow them continually, 
and I know, Ruth, that your prayers will 
mean much to them too. 

Affectionately, 

Minnie F. Bright. 



Problems in Opening Country Work 



RUTH F. ULREY* 



MANY, many villages in China have 
never heard the " Good News," and 
those who have heard of the for- 
eigner and the Message know very little of 
the Message and what it can mean to them. 
This indefiniteness is due to the fact that 
the Christian teachers have not been in 
their homes ; and what they have heard of 
the story has come indirectly through others. 

If the story of Christ is to be successfully 
carried to these village women, Chinese 
Christian women need to be used to help 
spread the news. One would think that 
at this stage of the work this would not 
be a problem. In fact there are Christian 
women, but for various reasons they can- 
not be secured. The girls have their wed- 
ding day arranged by their parents while 
they are still young, and this is binding in 
a way unknown to us. When the girls 
have finished their school work and could 
be used they are required to take up home 
duties as previously arranged. Girls who 
are free are a bit reluctant to take up 
country women's work because of the hard- 
ships involved. But perhaps greater than 
these is the fact that the country people 
cannot conceive of a single girl who is able 
to support herself — whether Chinese or for- 
eign. In other words, in the majority of 
places there is no place for the unmarried 
girl in their social system. In the cities this 
is changing, but still it has not penetrated 
to the country sections. This means that 



our women workers for the country come 
largely from the widow class, who have 
had two, three or four years of education 
at the most. Many of these are doing 
faithful work but there are not enough of 
them. 

After the worker is secured the next 
question is to get an entrance into the homes 




Missionary to China. 



A CHINESE WIDOW AND HER TWO CHIL- 
DREN. Her husband died without Christ. She 
believes their spirits would not be harmonious in 
the next world if she became a Christian. 



46 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



in the villages. There are a number of 
ways which can be used. Perhaps one of 
the best ways is through the invitation of 
a former acquaintance. Once an entrance 
is made into one home it is easy to get 
in touch with others in the same village. 
Former school pupils and hospital patients 
are glad for calls in their homes. Where 
street meetings are held one is often invited 
by the women to go into their homes. The 
biggest objection to this method is that you 
know nothing of the type of home to which 
you are invited. 

If one is to stay in these villages and 
work, a room in which to live becomes a 
necessity. True, there are inns, but for 
women they are not suitable. The only 
alternative left is to secure a room in some 
court where four or five families are very 
likely living — with one family to a room. 
In many of these places there is no spare 
room, which means that the people must 
crowd together in their already overcrowded 
rooms or go to the neighbors who are in 
similar circumstances. In Christian homes 
this is a bit easier but these are scarce in 
the unworked fields. 

If it were possible to enter a new field 
as a Chinese instead of a foreigner it would 
be easier; but as the saying goes, "Your 
speech betrayeth you." Not only that you 
are white and they are yellow. You are 
a curiosity indeed as you enter a new vil- 
lage and this is not strange for these peo- 
ple have heard the foreigner talked of much 
and they are eager to see what sort of a 
queer creature he may be anyway. One 
of the first comments is, " Oh, see their big 
feet! They wear such queer shoes with 
heels on ; they must hurt their feet." Then 
follows a torrent of questions, such as the 
following: "How old are you? How many 
children have you? What, that old and not 
married? Aren't you ever going to get 
married? How do you make your living? 
We could not have a living if we were not 
married." However, their curiosity is some- 
what satisfied as one becomes better ac- 
quainted in the field. 

To return more directly to the message 
itself. One of the biggest problems in the 
new field is to know what to give these 
women who have never read, and many of 
whom have never been so far as twenty or 



thirty miles away from home during a life 
time. In some cases one can begin with 
the " Heavenly Father," for they all know 
about him. When asked if they worship 
him they almost always say "Yes." When 
asked how they do it, the answer comes, 
" We kneel and bow to him, also burn 
incense." The following gives an idea of 
who they think he is. One day when 
talking to a woman about the Heavenly 
Father, she said : " Yes, the sun, lightning 
and thunder are the Heavenly Father. He 
has his birthday on the nineteenth of the 
third lunar month and we worship him then." 
They say the sun has his birthday at this 
time. This idea of the Heavenly Father, 
though quite different from the Christian 
one, gives a small foundation on which to 
work. In this way it is possible to work 
gradually from the known to the unknown. 

Over and over again as one goes about 
the work you hear the statement, "This is 
good talk." Many say it out of politeness 
but we sometimes wish they would oppose 
so we would have a place to begin. Others 
say it out of sincerity of heart, but the next 
problem that comes is to get them to do 
what they know. They often say, "The 
message is all right for you because you 
have read, but it cannot be any help to 
us." In a country where the women have 
had no freedom for centuries this objection 
is not as easily removed as it might seem; 
however there are those who are willing to 
make this step, otherwise our work would 
be most discouraging. If one or two sincere 
ones in each village can be led to accept 
Christ and tell their neighbors the outlook 
for the future of that village is bright. 

It is exceedingly hard for these people to 
break away from their old customs, for in 
China the ancient is much revered. A good 
example of this is that of a woman in one 
of our villages who heard enough of Christ 
that she could have accepted him as her 
Savior. The proposition was put up to her 
and she said her husband had died without 
Jesus, and she wanted to be with her hus- 
band. Custom says that the wife must be 
buried in the same place with her husband, 
and for a woman to be buried elsewhere is 
a great calamity. The spirits of the two 
are supposed to dwell together. Her accept- 
(Continued on Page 55) 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



47 



Only a "Babe" 

EFFIE V. LONG* 



SALAM, Saheb," he said as he walked 
up to the missionary's office door one 
morning. 

" Salam, brother, come in and have a 
chair. Where did you come from?" 

"I live in the village of B ," he replied. 

" I have just brought a boat-load of supplies 
to the port of the city near by, and knowing 
you were so near I could not resist the 
thought to come down and see you." 

"But who are you?" asked the saheb. "I 
don't remember you." 

Very slowly he began. " Saheb, do you 
remember a good many years ago you were 

camping in our village, in B ? I was a 

little boy then. My father's name is R 

and I am B ." 

" Oh, yes, I knew your father, and we 
did camp in your village several times." 

" Well," he continued, " you folks were 
showing pictures with the lantern, and hav- 
ing meetings every night. My brother and 
I were going to the mission school, but 
there were no Christians in the village (ex- 
cept the teacher and his wife whom you had 
sent there), and no one wanted to become 
Christian. 

" One day I got very sick. My parents 
did all they knew to do — they called the 
bhagat [holy man], and he sat there and 
mumbled off things no one could understand. 
Then they gave me ' dam,' that is, burnt a 
place on my body to let the demon out, but 
still I got no better; all thought I would 
die. One evening you came into our house. 
You saw I was sick and came at once to 
the bed, and asked my parents what they 
were doing for me. Then you told them 
about the God in heaven and that he alone 
can heal us and — I remember so well — you 
kneeled down by my bed and asked them 
to kneel too, and you prayed so earnestly 
to Jesus for me, that he would heal me. I 
thought then that he would certainly do it. 
You said we should do all we can for our- 
selves, and take medicine and ask him to 
bless it and to use it to heal us. Then you 
called Madam Saheb to bring me some 
medicine, and she came and gave it to me 



Missionary to India. Now on furlough in America. 



with her own hands for several days, and 
I got well. I always thought it was your 
prayer and your Jesus that healed me. I 
never could forget it and I resolved that I 
would worship him too when I grew up. 

"And I did want to. I would hear the 
missionaries when they toured the village 
after that, and the Christian teacher was 
always telling us about the Way — but some- 
how, it was so hard to do, as all our people 
were opposed to it. But now, at last, I 
have done it ! I am so happy. I have been 
baptized — and persecuted — but, I can stand 
it. To think I have waited all this time ! 
Now I am about thirty years old and a 
father of children. So now, that's all. I just 
wanted to see you and tell you that it was 
your prayer that led me to Jesus, and I 
know too that he healed me." 

The missionary was affected. He walked 
over and took him b|r the hand. " My 
brother, I praise the Lord for you and for 
your testimony. May he keep you true to 
himself, always rejoicing in him and seeking 
to lead others to him ! He chose his fol- 
lowers from among the lowly — the fisherfolk 
— just like your own." 

Then the Madam Saheb was called, and he 
told the story all over again so all could 
rejoice together. She asked about the health 
of his father and mother, and of the welfare 
of his brothers and sisters, calling them all 
by name as this family was especially dear 
to her. He marveled that she remembered 
them all after twenty years ! 

The minutes flew by; it was nearly time 
for his train. He said, " I must go, but — be- 
fore I go could we have prayer together, 
Saheb, please?" Of course we could! How 
happy at the thought ! It is usually the 
saheb who leads off in the conversation with 
those who come to his office daily. It is 
always the Saheb who says " let us pray 
together " before any one leaves his office. 
But today, how different! A "babe in 
Christ," a poor, weak Christian, no doubt, 
yet asking for prayer before parting! 

God bless him, and all such in India, and 
help them, like Andrew and Philip, to lead 
their brethren to him ! 



48 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



A Touching Incident 

ANNA M. HUTCHISON* 



SOME days ago we stood by the silent, 
lifeless form of an aged Chinese 
mother. Near us stood the only son, 
the only remaining member of the family — 
a young man of some twenty years of age. 
Overcome with grief and deep contrition he 
cried out, "I did it! I caused her death! 
Take my name off the church roll; I am 
not worthy that it be there. I am not worthy 
to live. I will carry the memory of this to 
my dying day." And raising both hands 
to his face he struck himself vehemently 
again and again, while we who witnessed 
felt touched with keenest pity and regret, 
both for the evident sorrow of the young 
man, and for the sudden passing away of our 
dear sister. 

Why such poignant grief ? Why such deep 
remorse? An aged mother and an only son! 
For years there had been but the two, 
except for the brief period of the life of the 
young wife in the home, who had early 
been called away. Both mother and son 
were devoted to each other except for the 
occasional outbursts of temper. This time 
it was Tuesday morning. The son had just 
partaken of the breakfast his mother had 
prepared, little realizing it would be his last 
opportunity to receive of her kindly min- 
istries. 

Breakfast over, a trifling incident occurred 
which stirred the demon, anger, and brought 
forth words that overshadowed the love of 
mother and son. In loud, angry tones the 
son rebuked his mother, and left for his 
school where he was teaching in another part 
of the city, only to return at noon to find 
his mother's lifeless form lying on her brick 
bed, cold in death. Apparently she had been 
overcome, at her advanced age, by the ex- 
citement of the circumstances of the morn- 
ing. And thus the son lives with the 
memory of a lifetime regret ! Truly, " He 
that is slow to anger is better than the 
mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit than 
he that taketh a city." 

Both mother and son were Christians, but 
since she was not able to get out often, we 
had frequently called in the home on Sun- 



Missionary, Liao Chow, China. 



days following our regular Church service, 
and alone with her had had a little season 
of worship and prayer together. Thus it 
happened that on the Sunday preceding her 
death we had gone in for one such service, 
when, as with prophetic instinct we were 
led to choose for our Scripture reading those 
beautiful last words of our Savior, " In 
my Father's house are many mansions ; if 
it were not so, I would have told you; for 
I go to prepare a place for you. And if I 
go and prepare a place for you, I will come 
again and receive you unto myself; that 
where I am there ye may be also." 

The words seemed to bring comfort and 
assurance. Then we sang together, " He 
Leadeth Me," after which our sister led in a 
beautiful prayer of childlike faith and trust. 
Then we parted, little realizing it would 
be our last meeting together on earth, so 
quietly did the spirit of our sister slip away 
on that Tuesday morn, to be with our 
Savior in the mansions he had gone to 
prepare. 

In our work at Liao Chou, Mother Yang 
had been one among the first to respond to 
the gospel call. Her heart was open to the 
truth at our first call in her home, and on 
our second visit she had taken down her 
idol gods and joyfully said she believed in 
them no longer and would not again worship 
them. This pledge we believe she kept 
during all the years that followed, and 
in simple faith had endeavored to follow her 
Master though it were in human weakness. 
And he will not fail to honor the faith of 
the least of his trusting ones. 

" Light somebody's torch, and your own 
will burn the brighter." 

Our Father has so much confidence in us 
that he makes no hard, arbitrary rule for 
Christian giving, but leaves it to the filial 
love and loyalty of his children to determine 
how much of their possessions they will 
offer to relieve the pains and sorrows of the 
world. — J. H. Jowett. 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



49 



Leadership in the 

WALTER J. 



THE question of an adequate Christian 
Leadership is not unique in the 
Church of the Brethren in China, 
although it is perhaps the most difficult 
problem we have before us at the present 
time. Nor does this question seem to be 
confined to China alone. At a recent con- 
ference of Christian leaders held at Peiping, 
Dr. John R. Mott said, " I have recently 
visited sixty-one countries and the most 
difficult problem of every country is the 
problem of an adequate leadership." 

The leadership problem is most vital and 
difficult in China because of the present 
revolutionary developments in the whole 
country. China has been one of the most 
conservative nations of the world. They 
have also been self-satisfied and self-con- 
tained. They have a history of great power 
and influence. They first recognized the 
superiority of western civilization in their 
humiliating defeat in the Boxer revolution 
of 1900. Since that time there has been a 
gradual swing toward westernism, and a 
depreciation of things Chinese, until the 
western nations were about to occupy the 
country. 

When Young China became conscious of 
this situation they arose in rebellion against 
everything old, and became most critical of 
everything new, so that now China is 
scarcely able to determine what is the best 
course to follow. Western culture, includ- 
ing Christianity, is undergoing the closest 
scrutiny, and much opposition and misunder- 
standing have resulted. There is therefore 
a demand for the strongest leadership with 
absolute conviction and confidence to guide 
the nation, and every phase of Chinese life, 
through this unsettled period. 

There are a number of influences that have 
been at work to militate against the develop- 
ment of a strong leadership for the Christian 
church in China. In many instances promi- 
nent and hopeful men and women have been 
lost entirely to the leadership of the church. 

First and fundamentally, it is exceedingly 
difficult to create a consciousness of com- 
plete change, which Christianity demands, in 



* Missionary, Show Yang, China. 



Chinese Church 

HEISEY* 

an individual with a heritage as old and 
superstitious as the civilization of China. 
The missionaries and people of the home 
churches have prayed most earnestly and 
worked faithfully for the complete rebirth 
and infilling of the Holy Spirit for the 
Christians and church leaders. And in many 
instances God has answered prayer and 
sacrifice in a marvelous way. Many souls 
have come to know God without any ques- 
tion or doubt, in spite of their heritage of 
superstition and doubt. 

But when the impact of western civiliza- 
tion came upon China, it raised many ques- 
tions in the minds of the students, questions 
with which it was struggling itself. Many 
sincere Christians who saw but dimly the 
light of the Cross shining in their old en- 
vironment, were not strong enough to hold 
their ballast, and therefore drifted off into a 
form of religion which was not vital to 
their own lives. Consequently many of these 
fell under the influence of the anti-Chris- 
tian movement. Others became indifferent to 
any religious influence, but remained pas- 
sively with the Christian church. 

A second factor which has contributed 
toward the loss to the church of many of 
the younger men and women, is the op- 
portunities which the progress of the Peo- 
ple's party offered to the students. This 
appeal was made especially strong to the 
students of the mission schools, because 
almost without exception the students in 
mission schools have a more thorough and 
broader training than that offered by the 
government schools. They also have a 
keener sense of responsibility. This is a 
splendid tribute to the faithful work done by 
the Christian schools, and although many 
young men and women have been lost to the 
direct leadership of the church, they have 
gotten into positions of influence with the 
government and have contributed largely 
toward the present friendly relations existing 
between the Nationalist government and the 
Christian church. It is reported that among 
the government officials and employees there 
are over three hundred Christians. 

This large group of Christians among the 



50 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



government employees offers a great oppor- 
tunity for Christianity on the one hand, but 
on the other hand the large number of 
Christians and students leaving the church 
employment creates a problem for the lead- 
ership of the churches. Take the Church of 
the Brethren, for instance. We have been 
working in China twenty years. Our first 
group of graduate students are few enough 
and were just coming to the place of leader- 
ship in the church when this wave of na- 
tionalism came along and took the majority 
of them away from us. Other churches are 
faced with the same problem, but perhaps 
to a lesser degree because their work has 
been established longer and they have a 
larger leadership already established. 

Notwithstanding the large number of 
Christians who have been lost to the leader- 
ship of the church directly, there is still a 
large force who have a vision of God and 
a passion for the souls of men. These 
comparatively few faithful witnesses in 
China are the hope and courage of the Chris- 
tian church. The history of the Christian 
church since the time of Christ is based upon 
an unbroken line of men and women who 
have had a vision of God, and whose faith 
in Christ kept them true to him under the 
most discouraging circumstances. 

The strength of the Chinese leadership in 
the church was proven in 1926 and 1927 when 
the missionaries at the advice of the consuls 
evacuated their stations. Those Chinese, with 
but very few exceptions, who were trusted 
with responsibility for the church proved 



themselves willing and able for the difficult 
task of carrying on the work. 

The work of our mission in Shansi is 
directed from four main centers. When 
the foreigners evacuated the work was or- 
ganized from these centers. The group of 
workers who carried on then are nearly all 
with us now, and are carrying much heavier 
responsibility in the church than we ever 
expected they would be willing or able to 
carry before we evacuated. 

One of the direct benefits of the turning 
of the Christian students to positions with 
the government, is the looking toward a lay 
leadership from among the local Christian 
groups. This leadership will not be as well 
trained as we might hope, but it is expected 
that it will hasten the idea of an indigenous 
church. The church in China has always 
held very high ideals and standards for the 
ministry. This has been due to the great 
respect with which educated people have 
been held in China. 

There has been a great deal of discourage- 
ment and a weakening of the morale of the 
Christians because large numbers of the 
students have left the leadership of the 
church. But with the new emphasis upon 
the local leadership, the church is taking on 
new interest, and this just at a time when 
the idols are being torn down and the 
greatest opportunity in the history of Chris- 
tianity is before the church. We believe 
with Paul the Apostle that " all things work 
together for good to those who love the 
Lord, to those who are called according to 
his purpose." 



A Devoted Father 



MYRTLE 

ONE evening just at dark two men 
entered the hospital court and called 
to the nurse standing on the porch 
of the second floor. In explanation for 
coming so late one said, " I have come to 
see if I can find my little boy's spirit/' 
Upon inquiry it was learned that during the 
early afternoon he had brought his little 
boy of four to see the doctor for some minor 
ailment. While waiting to see the doctor 
he had gone to the servants' room in the 
basement, with the water-carrier. While 



* Missionary to China. 



POLLOCK* 

there the child became frightened, the father 
thought because of strange faces and in a 
strange place. He cried, holding his breath 
and throwing himself into a temporary con- 
vulsion. He did not fully regain his natural 
condition upon reaching home and lay silent 
upon his bed, which condition greatly fright- 
ened the family. Hence, they being sure 
that he had lost his spirit, the father returned 
in search of it, a servant or neighbor hav- 
ing come with him. 

He brought with him a round thick cake 
to which a square of red cloth, six inches 
(Continued on Page 58) 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



51 



Narratives and People in Our Country Work Experience 



MARY SCHAEFFER* 



CHANG CHIU T'ANG, though a Chris- 
tian, was not a very warm-hearted one. 
He left home, wife and baby, with 
little support, to join the army. When the 
fighting was on during the spring of 1928, 
and airplanes were throwing bombs on army 
camps, he was sleeping in the field. He 
dreamed that an old man with a long white 
beard and dressed in white came to him 
and called "Chang Chiu T'ang " three times. 
He wakened and jumped up thinking that 
perhaps an officer had called him and was 
going to see what was wanted, when a 
bomb fell from an airplane on the very 
spot he had been lying and tore a deep 
hole in the ground. He feels that God used 
this method of saving his life, sending an 
angel in his dreams to call him, because 
on investigation he found no man had called 
him. He there and then promised God to 
live a real Christian life. He is home now 
taking care of his family and he has not 
forgotten his experience. His wife was 
baptized this last March. 

A certain woman wanted to hear our 
message. Her men folks would not allow 
her to come to the tent, neither would they 
allow us to come to their home. One day 
a little boy from a neighbor home whis- 
pered to us to come to their house at once 
and bring the Bible pictures. We went and 
told the Bible stories and sang some songs. 
This woman was there also. Her folks, 
missing her, became suspicious and the 
brother-in-law came to the neighbor's house 
to hunt her. "Who is listening to this 
talk?" he demanded. The neighbor lady 
said that she invited us in because she 
wanted to hear, and he went away. The 
woman was afraid and soon went home. 
The next day she went to another neigh- 
bor's house so she could hear again. Even 
the women of China can find a way if they 
will. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. first decided to become 
Christians when the tent was in their village. 
They were baptized a little more than a 
year ago. Even at that time she was suffer- 
ing from cancer of the stomach. Nearly a 



Missionary to China. 



year from the date of baptism she died, 
rejoicing in the knowledge that she was 
saved. She could not read but she remem- 
bered much that she had learned and tried 
many reforms in her home. Her husband 
could read a little. They were trying to live 
real Christian lives. Upon the death of 
Mrs. C. her neighbors said, " This is what 
you get when you do not worship idols 
any more." The husband answered, " Life 
and death belong to God." The son and 
daughter-in-law were baptized this year. 
Pray that they may be kept faithful in 
spite of discouragements. 

A few weeks ago I visited a village which 
I had visited eight years ago with Anna 
Blough. I wondered if I could find any of 
the girls and women who were in our class 
then. I found several, but one especially, 
then a girl of thirteen, had appealed to 
both Anna and me. She called me as soon 
as she heard that I was in the village. 
She was visiting her relatives; both her 
parents having died when she was a little 
girl. She has grown into a beautiful woman 
and is the mother of a dear little girl. She 
wanted to hear again the songs we taught 
eight years ago and the Bible stories we 
had told. She remembered some of them. 
She had hoped eight years ago to go to 
school. Her grandfather had promised to 
send her but he was old and died a few 
months after we left, so her hopes were 
blasted. She was soon married in another 
village and this visit to relatives happened 
when we were there. Eight years and only 
one opportunity to hear! So many places 
and so many people only touched! 

There are faithful ones all about us. and 
some unfaithful ones, but after all, the work 
of the home church and the missionaries is 
to live and to preach the gospel; the Holy 
Spirit will do the rest. The harvest is 
plenteous and ready to be harvested but the 
laborers are few. Pray that the Holy Spirit 
may have freedom in the hearts of the 
Christians at home and abroad, that the 
message of salvation and love may cover 
the whole earth. 



52 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



News from the Fields 



AFRICA 
Garkida 

Esther E. Beahm 
A Medical Trip — 

Many Vaccinated for Smallpox 

Early in the month Dr. Robertson and 
Bro. Heckman made a medical trip down 
south into Whona country. The doctor 
vaccinated many for smallpox as there had 
been some cases in that section. 

New Hospital 

Nearing Completion 

The new Ruth Royer Kulp Memorial Hos- 
pital is nearing completion and a large part 
of it is being occupied. It puts new spirit 
into the doctor and nurse to be able to work 
in their new surroundings. There is now 
a native nurse. A young Whona girl is 
helping evenings and mornings while she 
goes to school during the day. 

Promising Christian Teacher 
Called to Another Work 

The church met in council several weeks 
ago. The names of a small group of Buras 
were presented and approved for baptism. 
Among the group to be baptized was Heman 
Gwamsa and his wife Mwada. They were 
both people of splendid character and we 
were so happy in the outlook of having 
another Christian family with both of them 
interested in the church. It was hoped that 
they could be baptized during the week but 
several were not well. The following Sun- 
day found Heman and a fellow Christian out 
in a near-by village preaching. Sunday eve- 
ning he was down with pneumonia and 
Monday eyening God called him from us. He 
first came to Garkida to salute a relative who 
had come here to the doctor. He then 
moved here to get work. But as Brother 
Helser said in the funeral sermon, " God 
called him to another work." If only more 
people throughout the world would respond 
as completely to God's call as Heman did. 
It has been hard to give up our Christian 
neighbor but we are so happy that he had 
learned to know his Savior. We pray for 
his widow that she will be able to carry 
out her desire to be baptized. She went 
back home with her mother, but says she 
will return to Garkida shortly. 

Announcing Arrival of 
Philip Masterson Kulp 

The Robertsons and Helsers spent a week- 
end at Gardemna recently on a combined 
medical and evangelistic trip. The last day 
of the month found Dr. Robertson on his 
motorcycle headed for Lassa to salute the 
young Philip Masterson Kulp whose coming 
brings much joy to us all. 



Rainy Season Over — 
New Buildings Started 

The rains seem to be about over and 
the building season has started. Bro. 
Heckman is busy laying the foundation of 
the new Girls' School building as well as 
the single lady missionaries' residence. 

CHINA 
Liao Chou 

Elizabeth B. Wampler 
Hospital Work Carried On 
in Spite of Doctor's Absence 

It was a glad day for the Liao hospital 
when the old Ping Ting Ford stopped at 
the hospital gate bringing Dr. Wang back 
from his vacation. Due to sickness at Ping 
Ting we were. without an M. D. four out 
of the five weeks the doctor was away. We 
had not even a druggist or laboratory 
technician but we took care of all we could, 
pulled teeth, put a broken leg on the frame ; 
one obstetric case came in one evening. 
We told them our circumstance of being 
without a physician but they begged that 
we do what we could for her. She proved 
to be a primipera with complication of 
osteomalacia and also prolapsed cord and 
had labored more than a day before coming 
in. She did nicely however and returned 
home in good condition in due time. We 
were glad for our experience in an up-to- 
date lying-in hospital in a post graduate 
course while at home on furlough. A man 
addicted to the opium habit came in to be 
cured of the habit. We urged him to wait 
until the return of the doctor. But after his 
repeated requests to come then, we took 
him and gave him the cure. We are having 
a run in these cases at this time. 

Diary Reveals Busy and 

Profitable Evangelistic Tour 

Brethren Sollenberger, Oberholtzer and 
Wampler have just returned from a country 
evangelistic trip through Yu Hse and Ch'in 
Chou. Here are some clippings found in 
the diary that one of them kept while on 
the trip : " Nov. 8, first day. Traveled about 
twenty-five miles (donkey speed). Got into 
our inn about 8 o'clock. Had no fire. Had 
food brought from home of the innkeeper. 
We put up our cots in the donkey stable. 
Had plenty of cover and slept warm." 
Third day. " Played victrola and gave some 
children pictures (These pictures were 
mostly from some cut from Literary Digest 
and other magazines for this trip). Sollen- 
berger preached. This village has a place 
of worship. No fire. Some young men here 
are very warm hearted and ambitious to 
see the church go forward. Fifth day 
says, " Slept on a hot k'ang (Chinese brick 
bed). Roasted on all four sides." Friday. 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



53 



" Went twenty li, one member here. Held 
a class, good attendance." Sunday. " Large 
crowd attended the morning service. After- 
noon we had business meeting and com- 
munion. Seventeen communed, four women. 
Generally speaking interest is good in this 
section of the field. Slept in a cold room, 
nights very cold now." Monday. " Started 
for home." It is needless to say that 
American kept homes looked good to these 
travelers. 

Missionaries Have Enjoyable 
Thanksgiving Day 

The foreigners of Liao Chou enjoyed their 
Thanksgiving dinner at Miss Ulery's. Her 
Chinese cook can make things just like 
" mother made." The Oberholtzer and 
Sollenberger children gave us a scene in 
a Puritan home of 1621. The play was 
mostly their original work. Two of our 
present members were not with us for the 
occasion, Miss Hutchison, who is just re- 
covering from an attack of tonsilitis, and 
Miss Senger, who is at Tai Yuan Fu having 
some printing done for use in their evan- 
gelistic work. 

Shou Yang 
Sue R. Heisey 
Progress in Native 
Financial Support 

One of the problems confronting the young 
church in China is the beginnings of finan- 
cial support. The church at Yu Hsien has 
had special difficulty along this line, but they 
recently gained a great victory in their 
organization when they elected four mem- 
bers on a finance committee. The first three 
months they secured some nine dollars. 
This victory is also noticeable in their spirit- 
ual life. 

Second Communion Service 
at the Yu Hsien Church 

The second communion service at the Yu 
Hsien church was held on Saturday eve- 
ning, November 9, 1929. Fifteen members 
surrounded the Lord's table. The interest 
was good. Bro. Heisey officiated. In the 
morning of the same day one precious soul 
was baptized. 

Council Meeting 
at Shou Yang 

The council and communion services were 
held at Shou Yang November 16-17. There 
were forty-three members present at the 
council meeting. Bro. Harlan Smith was 
elected elder for 1930. Bro. Chao Fu Ling, 
secretary-treasurer. The monthly contribu- 
tions of the Shou Yang division of the 
church amounted to something over eighty 
dollars during the year. The total out- 
station contributions amounted to over 



seventeen dollars. These are small begin- 
nings for the church, but they are real 
beginnings. 

Dr. Hsing Saves 
Man's Life 

The hospital staff are working busily. As 
the work in the country among the farmers 
slackens, the work in the hospital increases. 
The Chinese toilets are large open pits, and 
are most unsanitary. One poor man had 
become dizzy and fallen head first into one 
of these pits. He came to the hospital at 
once. The doctor feared the worst for him, 
as his head and face were badly lacerated. 
Through special precautions the man is 
recovering nicely, and is grateful to Dr. 
Hsing. 

Sacrificial Service for the 

Evangelistic Work at Yu Hsien 

Sister Winnie Cripe has been located at 
Yu Hsien. In this way this division of the 
evangelistic work at Shou Yang will have 
more definite supervision. It will entail a 
great deal of sacrifice and perhaps some 
loneliness to live thus alone for the greater 
part of her time. 

Economy Effected 
in Primary School 

About twenty-two girls and twenty-five 
boys are enrolled in the lower primary school 
here. The boys and girls in the first two 
grades study and recite together, while in 
the other grades they are kept separate. 
This plan diminishes the expenses of the 
school by the sum of one teacher's salary. 
All the children of the lower primary school, 
both boys and girls, attend the junior church 
and Sunday-school on Sunday. 

Old Custom of u Speedy Home-going " 
in Case of Illness 

Within the last month we have had every 
chance for an epidemic of scarlet fever, as 
one little girl was quite ill for a whole 
week before her case was diagnosed, and 
in the meantime, practically all the pupils 
were exposed. After the nature of her ill- 
ness was known she was placed in isolation, 
her mother caring for her. When she was 
still scarcely able to walk, she was taken 
home on the train, to a point within four 
miles of her home, from which place she 
rode a donkey. She'll perhaps die from 
heart trouble some day and her folks will 
wonder why. Such a procedure, endanger- 
ing her own life and the health of her fellow 
travelers on the train, would have been 
prevented by law in America, but not in 
China. Any kind of illness in China de- 
mands a speedy home-going. We are cer- 
tainly thankful to our Heavenly Father for 
hearing and answering our prayer to " stay 
the plague." The little children of unchris- 



54 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



tian parents prayed for their schoolmate who 
was ill and prayed that the disease might 
not spread among them, and their prayers 
were graciously answered. Pray that ex- 
periences of this type may never be forgot- 
ten in the lives of these children. 

Tai Yuan 

Sara Zigler Myers 
Missionaries Welcomed 
on Their Return 

The Myers and Ikenberry families arrived 
in Tai Yuan October 22. It was a pleasure 
indeed to get back to our place of work 
once again. Because of the disturbed con- 
ditions in China both families had been away 
much longer than they had hoped to be, the 
Myerses having gone home on regular fur- 
lough in 1926 and the Ikenberrys at the time 
of the evacuation in 1927. On Sunday, 
October 27, the church had a welcome meet- 
ing for us. Pastor Li preached at the reg- 
ular morning service and then Mr. Chang, 
one of our members, representing the Chi- 
nese church, made a short welcome address, 
to which Mr. Ikenberry responded for the 
foreign group. Afterwards we drank tea 
together. 

Hope Amid Discouragements 
at Tai Yuan 

While there are many discouraging things 
in the work in Tai Yuan still there is a 
bright side and we are hoping and praying 
that we may be able to fit into our little 
" corner " and work together with our Chi- 
nese brethren for the furtherance of God's 
kingdom. 

Mr. Ikenberry Busy- 
in Y. M. C. A. Work 

Mr. Ikenberry has been very busy in his 
work among students in the Y. M. C. A., 
and again meeting and discussing problems 
of Christian work with the secretarial staff. 

Affiliation with Women's 

Organization Gives Mrs. Ikenberry 

Enlarged Opportunities 

Mrs. Ikenberry has received an appoint- 
ment on the executive committee of the 
Woman's Institute, an institution sponsored 
by the English Baptist Mission, which has 
a weekly meeting of varied programs to 
which the best women of the city are in- 
vited. This work brings her in touch with 
some very fine people which we hope will 
eventually result in additions to the Master's 
fold. 

Friendly Attitude of Chinese 
Appreciated by Missionaries 

We are appreciating immensely the friend- 
ly attitude of the Chinese people. The anti- 
foreign and antichristian spirit which was 
so rife several years ago is not nearly so 
pronounced now. 



Children of Gov. Yen's Secretary 
Taught by Mrs. Myers 

Mrs. Myers is having a thoroughly in- 
teresting experience teaching English twice 
a week to the two grown daughters and 
little son of Governor Yen's head Chinese 
secretary. The family, which seems to be 
a very fine one, is by no means Christian, 
yet we hope by such contacts to quietly sow 
the seed which may in time bring forth 
fruit for the Kingdom. 

Mr. Myers Plans Full Program 
of Evangelism 

Mr. Myers has been quite busy renewing 
acquaintances, teaching classes, and making 
plans for more personal evangelism. We 
feel that the personal touch and life of the 
Christian, whether Chinese or foreigner, 
mean much to the people with whom he 
meets and works. 

Ping Ting Chow 

Emma Horning 
Thanksgiving Program 
and Gift Service 

The church was packed with eager lis- 
teners at the Thanksgiving services. The 
new pulpit was especially beautiful when 
decorated with a number of house plants. 
The pupils of the various schools gave a 
number of special pieces of music. The 
musical program was interspersed with five- 
minute talks by various lay Christians. A 
collection of some thirty-seven dollars was 
taken and sent to the famine sufferers. 
Other gifts were also given among which 
was a bottle of grape juice for the com- 
munion service, and several brooms to 
sweep the church yard. The brooms were 
made and given by a farmer Christian. 

American Bible Society Worker 
Is Welcomed 

Mr. Chou, the American Bible Society 
worker for North China, visited all of our 
stations, selling Bibles and giving talks on 
the Bible, its great use in the world and 
how it has been prized by many great men. 
He held a large service in the church on 
Sunday, and spoke at the English services 
again in the afternoon. He also gave special 
talks to all the schools and hospital. In 
Leping all the government pupils and teach- 
ers with many of the business men came out 
to hear him. Mr. Chou spent a number of 
years studying in America. Everybody was 
much interested in what he had to say. 
Such talks mean much to our work. 

Zealous Christians at Hechia — 

Twenty Added to Their Number 

Bro. Yin has been working in our south- 
west district for two weeks. At this place 
there are some fifty Christians living in 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



55 



eight villages. Sister Schaeffer and Sister 
Chang did special work among the women. 
They used Hechia village as their center of 
work where they held a meeting each eve- 
ning. During the day they visited the 
Christians in the surrounding villages in the 
mountains. The Hechia Christians have 
prepared a place of worship, free of all 
expense to the mission, where all the serv- 
ices are held. Most of the Christians are 
very zealous in their Christian life and at 
this meeting twenty more were added to 
their number as inquirers. 

Christians from Ping Ting Enjoy 
Love Feast with Leping Christians 

Bro. Crumpacker spent two weeks with 
the Christians around Leping. At the close 
of this time a love feast was held, when a 
number of the Christians from Ping Ting 
took the auto and several bicycles and went 
down to enjoy the feast with them. Thirty- 
five communed, ten of whom were women. 

Efforts to Suppress Foot-Binding 

and Opium Smoking 

During the war opium smoking, gambling 
and foot-binding increased and is becoming 
a menace to society again. Efforts are now 
being made to suppress these pernicious 
habits. Women are being prepared and 
sent two by two into villages to search for 
children with bound feet and fine their par- 
ents several dollars. This seems to be the 
only means of stopping this cruel custom. In 
and around the city none of the children 
have bound feet, but in the more distant vil- 
lages the custom is almost as prevalent as 
formerly. As to gambling and opium smok- 
ing, we constantly hear of homes being 
raided and their occupants taken to jail. 

New Burial Customs Save 
Child from Tragic Death 

The customs of centuries are rapidly 
changing these days. Even burial customs 
are improving. Formerly no child under 
twelve was allowed to be buried in the 
family graveyard. They were just wrapped 
in a mat and put on the ash pile outside 
of the city. The other day a strange thing 
happened. A mother decided that she loved 
her child too much to throw it away when 
it died, so they took it to the family ceme- 
tery and were about to bury it when they 
heard a sound in the coffin and found that 
the child was not dead. They took it back 
home and fed it. It lived several days more 
and was finally buried properly in the family 
burying ground. 

Woman's Life Transformed 
by a Beautiful Vision 

Some of our Christians have a strong faith 
in prayer. With beaming face Mrs. Li tells 
her experience. She said her faith was 



rather weak until one night several years 
ago when she was teaching in the girls' 
school. That night she awoke to find a 
bright light in her room, something like an 
electric light. As she continued to look it 
grew brighter still and resembled a face. 
Then wings began to form and it grew so 
exquisitely beautiful that she could do 
nothing but gaze at it in wonder, admiration 
and love. She says she does not know how 
long she gazed but finally her eyes could 
stand the strain no longer and she closed 
them for a fraction of a moment, but when 
she opened them again the beautiful vision 
was gone. She firmly believes that God 
appeared to her in this vision, and it has 
been a great power in strengthening and 
transforming her life. There is nothing that 
she does not take to God in prayer. She has 
had many difficulties to contend with but she 
says God gives her peace through them all. 

Two Noted Englishmen 
Visit China 

Rev. Canon Streeter, a noted English 
speaker and writer, is now visiting China. 
He is speaking in the various churches of 
Peiping. Mr. Malcom MacDonald, son of 
the British premier, is also visiting China. 

Chinese Students Rank High 
in Columbia University Awards 

At Columbia University's 175th anniver- 
sary forty-seven alumni received medals. 
Of these forty-seven there were sixteen 
Chinese. This is the first time these medals 
have been awarded to foreign students. Of 
these sixteen who have been distinguished 
enough to merit these medals, several hold 
government positions and others are engi- 
neers, but the majority of them hold posi- 
tions in the large universities of this nation. 

PROBLEMS IN OPENING 
COUNTRY WORK 

(Continued from Page 46) 
ance of Christ would mean that their spirits 
would not be harmonious after her death. 
Pray for her and others in similar circum- 
stances that they may be willing to break 
away from the old false worship to that of 
the true and living God. 

We Do Not Mean to Stop 

A little Church in Ohio, whose goal for 
General Mission work was $100.00 this year, 
has been plugging along faithfully and has 
reached the sum of $98.55. The Missionary 
Committee writes, " We do not mean to 
stop when we reach the $100.00 pledge, but 
this is more than we ever have done before 
for last year we did not have a definite goal." 



56 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



The editor invites helpful contributions for this department of the Visitor 



Who Measures Your Lace? 



A STORY 

EARLY one rainy morning of a very- 
rainy week I went into the city to 
make a few purchases. As I went I 
gave myself a few words of instruction. 
They were these : " Now you are not going 
to talk to any Jew about the Christian re- 
ligion this morning. You are becoming 
obsessed with this thing. You think you 
must present the matter to every Jew with 
whom you have a chance to say a word. 
Now, this morning, you are not going to 
do it." 

When I went to the counter to make my 
purchase, a pretty dark-haired, dark-eyed 
girl came forward. The store had opened 
but a moment before, and customers were 
few. I commented inwardly on her beauty 
and thought how easily she could pass for 
a girl of American parentage. She helped 
me decide between two pieces of lace, which 
I thought almost equally desirable ; then, 
when she wrote my order, she was at a 
loss to know how to write my husband's 
name, not understanding how to write 
" Reverend." 

I told her how to write it and added, 
" That means that my husband is a min- 
ister. By the way, what church do you 
attend?" 

She hesitated a moment, then said, " I'm 
a little— Yiddish girl." 

I have noticed that Jewish girls are not 
proud to acknowledge their race. " But," 
said the young girl, " I do not go to church 
anywhere. My mother goes, but I have 
never had an interest in such things." Could 
I let such an opportunity pass by? You 
wouldn't; now would you? And I did not, 
either. 

Sadie seemed very much interested in 



what I had to say to her. Just then an- 
other customer approached the counter, and 
I said, " Do not let me interfere with your 
work. Go right ahead and serve your cus- 
tomer." I promised her a copy of the New 
Testament, which has since been delivered, 
and which she has promised me she will try 
to read regularly. As she went to wait on 
the next customer she said, " Come and talk 
to me again, won't you?" 

Perhaps not every message we give nor 
every copy of the New Testament we dis- 
tribute may bring immediate results, but the 
promise is, " So shall my word be that 
goeth forth out of my mouth; it shall not 
return unto me void, but it shall accomplish 
that which I please." Is Christ counting on 
you to present him to the little girl behind 
the counter? What if you fail him? The 
message may never be given if you do not 
give it. When I remember my talk with 
myself that rainy morning, and then recall 
the hospitality with which my message was 
received, I think, " Was it in the plan of 
Christ that I should introduce him to Sadie? 
What if I had not spoken?" — Mrs. Charles 
P. Wiles. 

Every element in the missionary problem 
depends for its solution upon prayer. — Robert 
E. Speer. 

Forth to the fight he fared. 

High things and great he dared. 

He thought of all men but himself; 

Himself he never spared. 

He greatly loved, he greatly lived, 

And died right mightily. — Oxenham. 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



57 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR WOMEN'S 

MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 

Based on "The Crowded Ways," Chapter 6 

" The Glory of life is to love, not to be loved; to 
give, not to get; to serve, not to be served. — 
Hugh Black. 

Devotions 
Hymn: "Tell Me the Old, Old Story" 
Scripture: Luke 13: 34,35; 19: 41-46. Com- 
ment on Jesus' concern for the city and 
his remedy for the city's ills in verses 
45 and 46 
Solo : " Awake My Soul in Joyful Lays " 
Prayer : Sentence prayers in behalf of 
Christian city workers 
Chapter Outline 

1. The Value of the Individual. Pages 158- 
161 

2. The Church's Opportunity for Service 

(a) Through the Pastor. Pages 161-164 

(b) "The Missionary" — The Story of 
Ann. Pages 164-166 

(c) A Church Bulletin 

3. Appeal Through the Group. Pages 173- 
177 

4. Mass Appeal 

5. Value of Personality. Pages 180-182 
Story: "Who Measures Your Lace?" 
Close with prayer, Page 182 
Hymn : " Lead On, O King Eternal " 

WORLD DAY OF PRAYER 

FOR MISSIONS 

March 7 

Join with women of many congregations 
in our Brotherhood, with women in other 
denominations and with women in all lands 
where Christ is known in this universal day 
of prayer. In our own mission fields the 
new born Chinese, Indian and African Chris- 
tian women will be joining you in prayer 
on this occasion. 

Materials for the Prayer Day 

The program " That Jesus May Be Lifted 
Up," 2c each, $1.75 per hundred. 

" The Call to Prayer " with daily cycle, 
free. 

Seals for letters and invitations, 25c per 
hundred. 

Order all supplies early from our General 
Mission Board. 

J* -J* 

A WAY TO FINANCIAL FREEDOM 

The Layman Company's pamphlet, " Win- 



ning Financial Freedom," has proved so 
popular and effective that once more we 
offer it to any pastor without charge. On 
request we will send, postage paid, enough 
copies to supply all the lay officials of his 
church. 

The pamphlet describes a simple method 
by which the pastor may carry on, quietly 
and steadily, the education of his people in 
the principles of Christian giving, without 
interfering with his other work, and at a 
cost purely nominal. 

The Layman Company is a non-profit, 
interdenominational Christian agency which 
puts its resources at the service of all the 
churches. 

When you write please mention The Mis- 
sionary Visitor and give your denomination. 
The Layman Company, 
730 Rush St., Chicago. 

DRAMATIZING THE JAPANESE AND 
MEXICAN PROJECTS 

The story of the Doll Messengers of 
Friendship to Japan and of the Friendship 
School Bags to Mexico is now available in 
motion pictures. These reels, depicting the 
development of these projects in the United 
States and the reception of the dolls in 
Japan and of the school bags in Mexico, 
may be secured from the Committee on 
World Friendship Among Children at a 
charge of $5 and $3 respectively, in addition 
to transportation costs. There is also an 
attractive volume on " Dolls of Friendship " 
which may be had for $1.50. The published 
story of this project will make a splendid 
addition to the peacemaker's library. 

A FILM "THE WILL TO PEACE" 

The Motion Picture Producers and Dis- 
tributors of America have made and pre- 
sented to the National Committee on the 
Cause and Cure of War a one-reel film 
entitled The Will to Peace. Requiring about 
twelve minutes to run, it pictures the signing 
of the General Pact for the Renunciation 
of War, at Paris on August 27, 1928; Mrs. 
Catt enjoying her lovely garden and at work 
and play in her home; the officers of the 
National Committee on the Cause and Cure 
of War planning the campaign in behalf of 
the treaty, and representatives of the various 
states calling upon their senators at Wash- 



58 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



ington January 15, as well as the final ratifi- 
cation at the White House on January 16. 
The film is available to organizations or 
groups, without cost, except for transporta- 
tion charges, upon application to the head- 
quarters of the Committee, 1015 Grand Cen- 
tral Terminal Building, New York City. — 
Council of Women for Home Missions. 

MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Conference Offering, 1929. As of December 31, 1929, 
the Conference (budget) offering for the year ending 
February 28, 1930, stands as follows: 
Cash received since March 1, 1929, $210,748.99 

(The 1929 budget of $363,000.00 is 58.1% raised, 
where as it should be 83.3%.) 

Mission Board Treasury Statement. The following 
shows the condition of mission finances on December 
31, 1929: 

Income since March 1, 1929, $258,259.62 

Income same period last year, 222,565.84 

Expense since March 1, 1929, 225,415.97 

Expense same period last year 239,641.40 

Mission deficit December 31, 1929, 67,527.82 

Mission deficit November 30, 1929, 84,790.74 

Decrease in deficit for December, 1929, 17,262.92 

December Receipts. Contributions were received 
during December by funds as follows: 

Total Rec'd 
Receipts since 3-1-29 

World-Wide Missions $14,802.01 $49,138.39 

Aid Societies' Mission Fund— 1927 263.00 3,121.86 

Home Missions 9,361.95 11,555.94 

Greene County, Virginia, Mission 190.69 278.27 

Foreign Missions 572.16 4,073.54 

Junior League— 1928 77.62 519.49 

Junior League— 1929 1,818.29 2,853.50 

B. Y. P. D.— 1928 15.00 159.50 

B. Y. P. D.— 1929 238.05 1,826.95 

Challenge Fund 5,500.00 6,550.00 

Women's Deficit Fund 2,482.36 2,482.36 

India Mission 214.86 1,666.43 

India Boarding School 386.25 998.22 

India Share Plan 494.25 3,642.71 

Dahanu Hospital 15.00 15.00 

India Hospitals 2.00 52.00 

India Widows' Home 3.65 3.65 

India Missionary Supports 2,735.41 17,830.14 

Vyara Church Building Fund .... 102.00 3,934.89 
Ahwa Church Building Fund .... 10.00 50.62 

China Mission 145.00 1,641.51 

China Native Worker 6.77 232.25 

China Boys' School 1.02 85.52 

China Girls' School 1.03 26.03 

China Share Plan 268.75 1,457.00 

China Missionary Supports 881.41 9,482.11 

Africa Missionary Supports 433.54 5,872.85 

Africa Mission 415.48 4,368.96 

Africa Share Plan 537.50 1,414.44 

Near East Relief 50.00 511.39 

China Famine Relief 27.35 765.33 

Conference Budget Donations 1,509.05 74,733.04 

Conference Budget Designated ... 100.35 348.32 



" By their missionary projects ye 
shall know them. The Christianity 
that is without the others' viewpoint 
never expands nor does it have a 
lasting hold on its adherents. The 
road to death is non-missionary." — 
Cletus A. Senft. 



A Children's Crusade 

Fifteen European countries have formed 
Committees on World Friendship Among 
Children, similar in many ways to the 
American Committee that has carried 
through the two friendship projects with 
Japan and Mexico. The International Com- 
mittee now includes eighteen countries, and 
it is hoped that a project in which the chil- 
dren of these countries will unite can be 
developed during 1931. England has already 
appointed the officers and members of her 
Committee and plans to carry on a project 
during 1930 with the children of some Euro- 
pean country. Holland and Belgium have 
agreed on the wisdom of an exchange good- 
will project between the children of the two 
countries. — Federal Council Bulletin. 

A DEVOTED FATHER 

(Continued from Page 50) 
square, had been attached by one corner, 
also very small scales, together with the 
child's clothes. He weighed the cake with 
the attached cloth, then carried the cake, 
dragging the red cloth over all the places 
the child had sat or been for four or five 
minutes, calling constantly, " Keng Hsiang," 
which was the child's name, " come and eat 
cake, come and eat cake and go home and 
eat mother's milk." The cake and cloth 
were then reweighed, but the weight had 
not increased and was unsatisfactory, so he 
again proceeded as before, but for a longer 
time and more insistent calling, " Keng 
Hsiang, come and eat cake and go home 
and eat mother's milk." This time holding 
the cake and cloth under the child's cloth- 
ing, he weighed them again. The weight 
had increased, which proved that Keng 
Hsiang's spirit had heard and had come to 
eat cake. The cake and cloth were speedily 
wrapped tightly into the clothes and the two 
men hastened home after generous thanks 
for being permitted to make the search. 

Later reports stated that the little fellow 
recovered immediately upon his father's 
return with the cake and the spirit. 

The will of God will be done; but oh, 
the unspeakable loss for us if we have missed 
our opportunity of doing it! — Bishop West- 
cott. 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



59 



mi junior missionary 



John 




JOHN. He was called baby John but now he is 
getting big. 

MOST all of you have heard some- 
thing about the boy in this picture. 
I wonder how many of you could 
guess his name if you didn't see it above 
the picture? Wouldn't you like to have him 
for a playmate? Perhaps he would enjoy 
playing with you, too. I think he would, 
for as this picture shows him, and as he 
almost always is, he is a very happy little 
fellow. In this picture he is especially happy 
because he has a new suit which some 
friends of his sent him from America. When 



he saw it he said : " Wanan daikyau," 
which means " This is good," but it is in 
the Hausa language and not in his native 
tongue. If he had said it in Bura he would 
have said: " Ngini an dagu." His present 
father and mother know some Hausa, al- 
though they speak Bura and Fulani much 
better. Then he is in the village, where 
there are many Marghi people and he picks 
up some words in that language. But if 
you talk to him in English he will under- 
stand you very well, though he doesn't talk 
as much English as he understands. 

John likes to ride horseback. If he hears 
a horse going by his house, even though 
he is about asleep or just awakening from 
sleep, he runs out and begs for a ride. And 
if the rider cannot take him along, John 
shows that he is still a small boy by crying, 
and crying is the same the world over, no 
matter what language. Best of all, he likes 
to ride in an automobile. But he is just like 
other boys and girls in this. However, he 
has not ridden more than two or three 
times, while most of you who read this 
ride a great deal. 

In this picture he is standing in front of 
his house. The mat behind him is made 
from grass and is like most mats in Bura- 
land, which the people use for many dif- 
ferent purposes. This one is used around 
the house to keep out wild animals at night 
and to bar unwelcome visitors. In the wet 
season it also keeps out the rain and wind. 

We want John to be a good boy. We 
want him to grow to be a good man. So 
when you talk to Jesus, ask him to help 
John to be a good boy. 

" Why build these cities glorious 
If man unbuilded goes? 
In vain we build the work unless 
The builder also grows." 



60 



The Missionary Visitor 

John and Lizzie 



February 
1930 




WE have many opportunities to have 
pets in Africa. Some like the 
antelopes and some monkeys and 
some pigs and some leopards and some 
baboons. Here is a small red monkey that 
John liked to play with. He would try to 
take her peanuts away from her, to eat 
himself. She didn't mind sharing them with 
him, either. Here you see John and Lizzie 
playing together. The red monkeys run in 
droves through the bush, many times near 
to natives' farms. The larger ones have 
very pretty skins with long hair. One 
morning, when I was riding home from the 
river on horseback, I came across two big 
red monkeys, and I started after them as 
fast as my pony could run. For a short 
distance they managed to run away from 
me, but as I kept after them they got rather 
tired, and soon one of them darted up into 
the thick leaves of a tree. The other one 
went a short distance and climbed into an- 
other tree. I happened to have a shotgun 
along with me, and so shot the one, but the 
other one had meantime changed trees and 
so I lost him. The natives have great diffi- 
culty in keeping them out of their farms 
during harvest, especially from their peanut 
patches. A big drove of monkeys can dig 
up a patch of peanuts much faster than a 



man and his family can, and they don't miss 
many. Even on the mission compound they 
occasionally come close, but a few shots at 
them and they remember we have the sticks 
that shoot fire and sting when hit. This 
particular monkey in the picture got into a 
fight with a dog one Sunday morning while 
we were at church. A native woman who 
was going by saw her predicament and 
drove the dog away, but only after he had 
broken her arm in three places. We took 
her to the doctor, and he set it in a splint, 
and she got along very well for about two 
weeks. Since she couldn't climb her pole in 
the box at night we were keeping her on 
the veranda. One morning I was awakened 
about three o'clock with the words : " Some- 
thing has Lizzie." We hurried out of bed, 
but she was gone. A leopard had come 
upon our front veranda and taken her away. 
The next day we found only the safety pins 
with which we had tied her broken arm. 




MISSIONARY WORKERS IN BARREN RIDGE 
CONGREGATION (2nd Dist. Va). Top: Live Wire 
Class. Mrs. Viola H. Gibson, teacher. Bottom: Young 
Americans Class. Mrs. Deliah Diehl, teacher. Both 
of these classes worked for Africa during the past 
year. 



February 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



61 



Little Builders 



WHY, Miss Sarah," said the president 
of the Junior League,* to the su- 
perintendent, " we children couldn't 
do much toward the support of all our mis- 
sionaries' children. You just know we 
couldn't. We are nothing but children." 
"And," added Mary Stewart, the secretary, 
" none of us ever have much money — just 
pennies and nickels and dimes, and some 
quarters about Christmas time." 

" Let me tell you a story," said Miss 
Sarah. Every member of the Junior League 
was ready to listen, for Miss Sarah always 
told such beautiful stories. 

" In the Pacific Ocean," she said, " there 
were once long ago many broad, empty 
spaces without any land. The ocean was 
blue and beautiful, but there was no eye to 
see it. The sun shone brightly, but no 
flowers nor trees could grow beneath its 
rays. The seeds that fell from other coun- 
tries into the water floated by, but there was 
no soil where they could stop to rest. The 
Master saw that if there were only some 
islands there might be lovely homes for 
men and animals. 'My little builders can 
do this,' said he. So he called for the coral 
insects, and told them to build three islands 
in one place, five in another, seven in an- 
other, and so on. The little workers were 
so taken by surprise that they popped their 
heads out of their windows and looked at 
each other in astonishment. ' We !' they 
exclaimed, ' we are not bigger than pin 
heads ; we never could build one island, to 
say nothing of a whole oceanf ul !' Tf the 
whales would try, now ! A whale's work 
would amount to something,' said the Astrea. 
" ' But the whales have their own work 
to do,' said the Master Builder; 'and if they 
come down here to make the islands, who 
will keep the North Pacific free from sea- 
weeds? I do not ask one of you alone to 
build an island. Think how many there 
are of you.' 

" ' But we do not know how to shape the 
islands;' they will all be wrong,' cried the 
Madrepora. 
" ' I will take care of that,' said the Mas- 



* In churches where there is no organized Junior 
League, " Jane, an enthusiastic junior," may be 
substituted for " president of the junior League." 



ter; 'only see that each one builds one little 
cell.' 

" So the corals divided the work among 
themselves. Some began to build the mid- 
dle, and some the outer edge. Very busily 
and patiently they wrought. The islands 
grew higher and higher, until they came to 
the top of the water. Then the waves and 
winds did their part by bringing sand and 
weeds and leaves to make soil. The nuts 
and seeds that had fallen into the water, and 
were so tired of bobbing up and down all 
the way from India and South America, 
found a nice bed to sleep for a few days. 
When they felt rested they got up and grew 
into thorn trees and bushes and cocoa trees. 
Long vines began to creep across the sand, 
and sweet flowers blossomed; men and ani- 
mals came to live there, and little children 
ran about and played beside the ocean. The 
islands were named the Friendly Islands, the 
Caroline Islands, and so on. 

" ' Who would have believed we could do 
it !' said the little corals when they saw 
the result. ' The whales could not have done 
it better. And to think it was all done by 
our making one cell apiece !' They felt so 
proud of their islands that they put a lovely 
fringe of red and white and pink coral 
around the edge, and today thousands of 
people are enjoying the work of these little 
coral builders." 

The president and the secretary looked 
at each other and then they looked at Miss 
Sarah. 

" If all the children would help I believe 
we could support all the children of mission- 
aries on the mission field," said the president. 

" I move," said one of the members, " that 
each one of us build one little cell by doing 
just as much as we possibly can." 

" I second the motion," said another mem- 
ber. 

" Everybody in favor of this motion," said 
the president, " say, ' aye ' and go right to 
work to build one little cell." 

And that is what everyone of them said 
and what everyone of them did. 

Adapted from leaflet, "Little Builders," 
published by Women's Missionary Society, 
United Lutheran Church in America, 



62 



The Missionary Visitor 



February 
1930 



MISSIONARY WOR- 
SHIP PROGRAM 
FOR JUNIORS 

Call to Worship (by the 
Leader) : " The Lord 
is in his holy temple ; 
let all the earth keep 
silence before him." 
Praise Hymn : " Holy, 
Holy, Holy, Lord God 
Almighty " (one stan- 
za). 
Scripture Lesson: 
Leader : " Go ye into 
all the world and 
preach the gospel 
to the whole crea- 
tion." In Psalm 96, 
also, we are urged 
about the true God. 
A Junior: Psalm 96. 
Prayer 

Hymn: "We've a Story to Tell to the Na- 
tions." 
Explanation of 1930 Junior Missionary Proj- 
ect. 
Story: "Little Builders" (To be told by 
the Leader) 



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WILLING WORKERS at Oakland, So. Ohio. Mrs. H. B. Martin, teacher 

to tell all nations Offering Service: 

Leader : " Give unto the Lord the glory 
due unto his name; bring an offering 
and come into his courts." 
Response : " God loveth a cheerful giver." 

Prayer : 
" Dear Lord, thou gavest all to me, 
All that the world calls mine; 
And of thine own I give to thee, 
For all I have is thine." 



Enlarging Your Missionary Horizon 

1. What is Secularism? How does this new philosophy relate itself to missions? p. 34. 

2. Are missionaries among Moslems in India as numerous as among Hindus? p. 34. 

3. Why is February known as Achievement Month? p. 35. 

4. What happened with the small boy's nickel? p. 36. 

5. What are the prospects on meeting the mission challenge? 
See the item, Rating the Missionary Giving, p. 36. 

6. Why is the registration of mission schools in China an important problem? p. 37. 

7. What does Ramsay MacDonald think of missions? p. 38. 

8. Tell of work done in the Dahanu Hospital, India, p. 39. 

9. How many lepers of Nigeria, Africa, the province in which the Church of the 
Brethren has missionaries? What are we doing for them? p. 40. 

10. What is the China Christian Council? What does it do? p. 42. 

11. Tell of the Chinese boy who was too poor to buy a book and yet went through high 
school, p. 44. 

12. Why are women workers so scarce among the Chinese? p. 45. 

13. Tell how missionary work bore fruit a long time after the seed was sown? p. 47. 

14. Tell of the development of leadership for the Chinese church in China, p. 49. 

15. What is the status of the Ruth Royer Kulp memorial hospital in Africa? p. 52. 

16. Tell of a missionary's diary, p. 52. 

17. Tell of progress of Chinese native church financial support, p. 53. 

18. Who will join in the World Day of Prayer for Missions? p. 57. 
19. 



What per cent of the Conference budget was raised by Dec. 31? 
have been raised? p. 58, 



How much should 



g Church of the Brethren Missionaries 

^5T Supported in Whole or in Part by Funds Administered by the General Mission Board 

Vgb With the Year They Entered Service 



AMERICA 

Church of the Brethren In- 
dustrial School, Geer, Va. 

Bollinger, Amsey, and Flor- 
ence, 1922 

Finckh, Elsie, 1925 

Hersch, Orville, and Mabel, 
1925 

Kline, Alvin and Edna, 1919 

Knight, Henry, March, Va. 
1928 

Wampler, Nelie, 1922 
In Pastoral Service 

Bowman, Price, and Elsie, 
Bassett, Va., 1925 

Eby, E. H., and Emma, 2923 
St. Joseph Ave., St. Jo- 
seph, Mo., 1927 

Weiss, Lorell, 1188 Missouri 
Ave., Portland, Ore., 1927 

Haney, R. A., and Irva, 
Lonaconing, Md., 1925 

Rohrer, Ferdie, and Pearl 
Jefferson, N. C, 1927 

Ziegler, Edward, and Ilda, 
405 E. Eleventh Ave., John- 
son City, Tenn., 1923 

Barr, Francis and Cora, Al- 
bany, Ore., 1928 
In Evangelistic Service 

Smith, Rev., and Mrs. S. Z., 
Sidney, Ohio 

SWEDEN 

Graybill, J. F., and Alice, 

Bergsgatan 45, M a 1 m o, 

Sweden, 1911 
Norris, Glen M., and Lois, 

Spangatan 3 8, M a 1 m 6, 

Sweden, 1929 

On Furlough 

Buckingham, Ida, Oakley, 
111., 1913 

CHINA 
Liao Chow, Shansi, China 

Hutchison, Anna, 1911 
Oberholtzer, I. E., and 

Elizabeth, 1916 
Senger, Nettie M., 1916 
Shock, Laura J., 1916 
Ulery, Ruth F., 1926 
Wampler, Ernest M., 1918, 

and Elizabeth, 1922 

Ping Ting Chow, Shansi, China 

Bright, J. Homer, and Min- 
nie, 1911 

Crumpacker, F. H., and Anna, 
1908 

Flory, Byron M., and Nora, 
1917 

Flory, Edna R., 1917 

Horning, Emma, 1908 

Metzger, Minerva, 1910 

Schaeffer, Mary, 1917 

Sollenberger, O. C, and 
Hazel, 1919 



Show Yang, Shansi, China 

Clapper, V. Grace, 1917 

Cripe, Winnie, 1911 

Heisey, Walter J., and Sue, 
1917 

Neher, Minneva J., 1924 

Smith, W. Harlan, and Fran- 
ces, 1919 

Tai Yuan Fu, care of Y. M. 
C. A., Shansi, China 
Ikenberry, E. L., and Olivia, 

1922 
Myers, Minor M., and Sara, 
1919 

On Furlough 

* Brubaker, L. S., and Marie, 
331 S. 3d. Covina. Calif., 1924 

Pollock, Myrtle, 520 E. Kan- 
sas Ave., McPherson, Kans., 
1917 

AFRICA 

Garkida, Nigeria, West Africa, 
via Jos 

Beahm, Wm. M., and Esther, 

1924 
Harper, Clara, 1926 
Heckman, Clarence C, and 

Lucile, 1924 
Robertson, Dr. Russell L., 

and Bertha C. 1927 
Rupel, Paul, and Naomi, 1929 
Schechter, Elnora, 1929 
Shisler, Sara, 1926 

Lassa, via Maiduguri, Nigeria, 
West Africa 

Kulp, H. Stover, 1922, and 
Christina, 1927 

On Furlough 

• Burke, Dr. Homer L., and 
Marguerite, 6317 Grand 
Ave., Chicago, 111., 1923 

Gibbel, Dr. J. Paul, and 
Verda, 1416 W. Fourth St., 
Waterloo, Iowa, 1926 

Helser, Albert D., 1922, and 
Lola, Thornville, Ohio, 1923 

Flohr, Earl W., and Ella, 
Vienna, Va., 1926 

INDIA 
Ahwa, Dangs, Surat Dist.. 
India 

Garner, H. P., and Kathryn, 

1916 
Royer, B. Mary, 1913 
Anklesvar, Broach Dist., India 

Grisso, Lillian, 1917 

Lichty, D. J., 1902, and Anna, 

1912 
Miller, Sadie J., 1903 
Moomaw, I. W, and Mabel, 

1923 
Woods, Beulah, 1924 



Bulsar, Surat Dist., India 

Blickenstaff, Lynn A., and 

Mary, 1920 
Blough, J. M., and Anna, 

1903 
Cottrell, Dr. A. R., and 

Laura, 1913 
Fox, Dr. J. W., and Besse, 

1929 
Mohler, Jennie, 1916 
Shumaker, Ida C, 1910 

Dahanu Road, Thana Dist., 
India 

Blickenstaff, Verna M., 1919 
Ebbert, Ella, 1917 
Metzger, Dr. Ida, 1925 
Roop, Ethel, 1926 
Swartz, Goldie E., 1916 

Jalalpor, Surat Dist., India 

Miller, Eliza B., 1900 

Vada, Thana Dist., India 

Brumbaugh, Anna B., 1919 
Ebey, Adam, and Alice, 1900 
Shull, Chalmer, and Mary, 
1919 

Palghar, Thana Dist., India 

Alley, Howard L., and Hat- 
tie, 1917 

Post UmalLa, via Anklesvar, 
India 

Miller, Arthur S. B., and 

Jennie, 1919 
Widdowson, Olive, 1912 
Ziegler, Kathryn, 1908 

Vyara, via Surat, India 

Brooks, Harlan J., and Ruth, 

1924 

Wagoner, J. E., and Ellen, 

1919 
Mow, Anetta, 1917 

Burjor Bag, Lunsikui, Nav- 
sari, India 

Mow, Baxter M., and Anna, 
1923 

Woodstock School, Landour 
Mussoorie, U. P., India 
Stoner, Susan L., 1927 

On Furlough 

Butterbaugh, Bertha, 3435 W. 

Van Buren St., Chicago, 

111., 1919 
Nickey, Dr. Barbara M., 

Monticello, Minn., 1915 
Kaylor, John I., 1911, and 

Ina, 1515 Second St., Bak- 

ersfield, Calif., 1921 
Long, I. S., and Effie, Bridge- 
water, Va., 1903 
Shickel, Elsie N., 2211 Orange 

Ave. N. W., Roanoke, Va., 

1921 
Wolf, L. Mae, Franklin 
Grove, 111., 1922 



• Otherwise employed in America until conditions permit return to the field. 



Please Notice.— Postage on letters to our missionaries is 5c for each ounce or fraction 
thereof and 3c for each additional ounce or fraction. 



February Is Achievement Month 

The business year of the General Boards ends February 28, 1930. 

Special effort is being made to clear the Mission Board of a deficit. 

The February offering is usually asked for the Conference Budget which includes the 
needs of all the General Boards. Because of this annual custom and also because of the 
special appeal for mission funds, the contributor is privileged to indicate on the blank be- 
low the fund in which you wish your contribution placed. 

^^ s ^ > J^^ s ^^s^,^ > ^^^^ > ^ > ^^^^ > ^ > ^ > ^ > ^^^s^ > ys^^>^^s^>^>ysy>^>y^»ysy^>^ CUT HERE vviwwws^vw 

Achievement Offering 

BLANK FOR SENDING MONEY 

Brethren's General Mission Board, Elgin, 111. 
Dear Brethren: 

Enclosed find Dollars 

as an offering for Missions and Church Promotion to carry out the program as 
authorized by Annual Conference. 



Note. — The treasurer of the 
General Mission Board is 
also the treasurer for Con- 
ference Budget funds. 



CONFERENCE BUDGET for Missions and Church Promotion $. 



General Mission Board, World Wide Fund 

Board of Religious Education 

General Ministerial Board - 

General Education Board 

American Bible Society - 

Which amount is from: 



, Individual 

... Sunday-school Class 

, Christian Workers 

B. Y. P. D. 

Aid Society 

, Junior Church League 

Sunday-school 

... CONGREGATION 
.. STATE DISTRICT 



Name of Sender 

Street Address or R. F. D 

Postoffice State 



Please do not write in this space 



Date 




Amount Enclosed 




. 1Q. ... 


$ 





A Few Reminders 

Please make all orders payable to Breth- 
ren's General Mission Board and to no in- 
dividual. 

Money should be sent in Bank Draft, per- 
sonal check, Postoffice or Express Money 
Order. 

Please show what congregation and Dis- 
trict should have credit for this. This is for 
the Record of Giving. 

Full name and address should be given to 
insure a prompt return of receipt. 

Orders for tracts, Visitor subscriptions, 
etc., should be on separate sheet. 



THE 

MISSIONARY 



Visitor 




Church of the ^Brethren 



Vol, XXXII March, 1930 



No. 3 



Who Would Not Follow? 

I heard him call, 
"Come follow"; that was 
all. 
My gold g'rew dim, 

My soul went after him. 
I rose and followed, that was 
all. 
Who would not follow if he 
heard his call? 



66 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



When the Deficit Is Paid 



WE might have said " IF " but we 
believe it will be paid. As these 
lines are written, Feb. 5, we cannot 
know the result of the Mission Challenge 
effort. This we know: thousands of loyal 
brethren are praying daily and backing up 
their prayers that the Lord's mission treasury 
may not be empty. It is so much joy to 
work with such Christians that we feel like 
saying in behalf of the Mission Board 
THANK YOU. Yet it is the Lord's work 
and he alone can reward those who have 
been his coworkers in the development of 
his kingdom. 

It is in place to state appreciation for the 
loyal cooperation of the church, its ministers, 
treasurers, its rich and poor, the women and 
men, the children and young people. Re- 
gardless of the total money contributed for 
the year we express our commendation of 
your loyal stewardship. 

After February 28 

There has been much conjecturing as to 
what will take place in the new year. Some 
have ventured a guess that if the deficit 



were paid before Feb. 28, the members 
would take an extended vacation with the 
result that the long dry spell would cause 
a new deficit. It will not be the policy of 
the Mission Board to continue the intensive 
campaign for funds. On the other hand it 
is important for every congregation to set 
up plans whereby a normal flow of funds 
can be raised for missions. The monthly 
S. S. offering is very valuable. Placing 
an amount for missions and church promo- 
tion in the budget is ideal. Let the minis- 
ters and missionary committees plan now 
for the conference offering to be received in 
May. 

The Deacon's Wife Joins 

The spirit to minister is a quality of life 
that characterizes wives of ministers. But 
now we cannot say that they have an exclu- 
sive monopoly, for a good woman in South- 
west Kansas writes, " I see our ministers' 
wives are giving to this deficit and I was 
wondering about the deacons' wives, whether 
they could do something along this line also. 
I am a deacon's wife and I felt like sending 
in my check for $25.00." 



Swept In by the Tide 



Missionaries Interested in the Well 
Being of the People 

DR. J. A. EVANS of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, speaking before 
a group of missionaries on furlough 
said, " We do not believe any missionary 
will do much good who does not try to 
promote the physical well being of the peo- 
ple to whom he goes. The Department of 
Agriculture believes in the missionary. For 
more than thirty years the contact with 
missionaries has been very helpful." 

Dr. Evans told, as a concrete example, of 
a service rendered by one missionary in 
Korea : " Dr. Ralph G. Miller, a medical mis- 
sionary stationed at Seoul, Korea, now asso- 
ciated with the Mayo Clinic of Rochester, 
Minn., because of his interest in botany as 
a hobby, noted an unusual legume growing 
close to the ocean in Korea. Recognizing 
that a leguminous plant growing under such 



conditions might be of real value, he sent 
to the Department in 1919 seed of this plant. 
This was tried out and found to be a 
Lespedeza, different from any yet introduced 
and possessing unusually valuable character- 
istics. Its culture is rapidly spreading in the 
South where it is becoming an important 
forage plant. Last year there were about 
5,000 acres planted to this crop. The area 
is growing by leaps and bounds. This is but 
one example of many that might be given." 

China's Political Situation 

Governor Yen of the Shansi Province in 
which the Church of the Brethren is located, 
on December 20 broke his silence regarding 
the political situation in China. He ex- 
presses his conviction that nothing is more 
pressing in China than the need of imme- 
diate cessation of civil strife. For this 
reason he has abstained from participating 
in military movements. He says that un- 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



67 



fortunately there are various factions which 
are greatly hindering the progress of the 
central government. He fears they will 
bring catastrophe on the nation. By his 
firm and original desire for peace, he ex- 
presses his intention to fight these rebel 
factions if they do not cease disturbing the 
progress of the government. 

Love Feast in China 

Brother J. Homer Bright in China, writing 
of progress, says that on Monday before 
Christmas there were baptisms in the fore- 
noon followed by communion in the evening. 
" It was one of the quietest feasts we have 
had for a number of years. A spiritual 
blessing came to all who were present." He 
tells of recent baptisms of twenty-six people, 
one of whom was the daughter of Brother 
and Sister B. M. Flory. She was baptized 
by the Chinese pastor, Brother Yin, and the 
service was all in Chinese, the same as 
for the Chinese applicants. Brother Bright 
takes occasion to remark that their son, 
Calvin, was also baptized by Brother Yin a 
few years ago before they came to America 
on their last furlough. 

The Women's Interest in Missions 

Sister J. S. Bowlus, sending in a mission 
contribution from the Pleasant View Aid 
Society, Middle Maryland, says, "A number 
of organizations in our church helped to send 
this money. Instead of members exchanging 
Christmas gifts in the customary manner, 
their money was given to the Christmas 
missionary offering. The Aid Society also 
conducted a food sale and many people in 
the church helped to make this a success. 
The result of this sale was $84.31. All of 
their work was done with prayer that the 
Lord would bless every effort put forth for 
the promotion of the Kingdom." 

When a Missionary Writes a 
Personal Friend 

The missionaries are hungry to keep 
abreast of the times in America, the same 
as we at home. From one missionary's letter 
to a personal friend we read the following : 
" Who won the football conference cham- 
pionship? Did you lose anything in the 



Wall Street collapse? Have you seen the 
Cord car and the Baby Martin? Have you 
ridden up in the air yet? Do the smaller 
one dollar bills last longer?" 

Gandhi Not a Spent Force 

When Mr. C. F. Andrews, great English 
missionary friend of India and intimate 
counselor of Tagore and Gandhi, was in New 
York the other day he cautioned his hearers 
against the belief that Mr. Gandhi's influ- 
ence had waned in India. 

" Gandhi is not a spent force. Of all edu- 
cated men in India he is the only one who 
can 'get' the common people. But he 'gets' 
them always. His program deals now, as 
heretofore, with the facts which the masses 
have to meet." 

In all of his great efforts for the preven- 
tion of an industrialization that would break 
up India's rural life ; for the adoption of 
Prohibition ; the abolition of untouchability ; 
the moderation of Hindu-Moslem rivalry; 
the prevention of child marriage; and the 
establishment of the custom of allowing the 
remarriage of widows; as well as for the 
dominion status in Indian government, he 
still insists on non-violence. 

He always resigns when violence is shown 
and all the people know that he will do it 
again. 

A light upon Gandhi's program which has 
not been shed by most of his interpreters 
comes from Mr. Andrews in the form of a 
statement that Gandhi is not opposed to 
machinery as such, that he favors electric 
power and the use of the Singer sewing 
machine, for example, in the homes. What 
he wants to avoid is the centralization of 
the people in great factory towns with the 
inevitable consequences for human life of 
such crowding. He has found a wealthy 
friend to make it possible for him to offer 
$50,000 for the invention of a machine that 
will facilitate the efficient weaving of cloth 
in the home. He knows that the farmers 
have nothing to do during a large part of 
the year and that were they able to use 
such a machine for spinning in the months 
when agricultural work is out of the ques- 
tion, they could save at least a half of the 
family budget. — The Congregationalism 



68 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



Bread Cast on the Water 

The Northern Illinois District News Letter 
reports that Brother Niels Esbensen has 
recently held an evangelistic meeting in the 
Lena church, where eight souls stood for 
Christ. Three hundred were present on the 
second Sunday. History tells us that num- 
ber followed Brethren Enoch Eby and 
Daniel Frey and their wives from that con- 
gregation to the railway station when they 
sent them to Denmark in 1877 to baptize, and 
organize a church in that land. It is beau- 
tiful to think that a son of that country 
now comes to the Waddams Grove church 
and baptizes some of their number in return. 
We wonder how long it will be till the mis- 
sions of India, China and Africa will do a 
similar thing? 

Save the Children 

The Save the Children International Union 
has set forth what is known as the " Dec- 
laration of Geneva." The World War with 
its devastating, blighting effect on childhood 
brought forth the following declaration, done 
in verse by Elbel Sidgwick : 

I. The CHILD a birthright shall inherit 
For natural growth in flesh and spirit. 

II. The CHILD a-hungered shall be fed, 
The sick child nursed and comforted, 
The backward child with patience led; 
The erring shall be claimed from sin; 
The lonely child, bereft of kin, 
Unloved, shall be taken in. 

III. In dire catastrophe and grief, 
He shall be first to have relief. 

IV. Betimes the way he shall be shown 
To earn his bread and stand alone. 
None shall exploit him, yet ungrown. 

V. And this, his trust, shall be defined : 
The best of him, of heart and mind, 
Is at the service of his kind. 

The High Cost of Wives 

Wives in America who seek divorces with 
supports attached may seem very expensive. 
In China according to recent reports the 
cost of wives has increased, and there it is 
the first cost that is high. Because of the 
higher death rate of girl babies and of adult 
women over men there is a shortage of 
women. Men need to travel to distant parts 
of the country for wives, The law of supply 



and demand operates in this matter as well 
as in merchandise goods. The price range 
is reported from two to eight hundred dol- 
lars. A girl in the twenties, with a few 
years of schooling and from a good home, 
would easily cost $600.00. If she had already 
been married and is a widow she would 
bring a hundred more. Of course the par- 
ents of the girl are the recipients of the fee. 

The Famine in China 

Many have read the newspaper reports of 
the terrible famine in China. In loss of life 
it is probably one of the worst in recent 
years. The American Red Cross sent a 
committee to investigate and found condi- 
tions as reported by newspapers. Other 
committees upon investigation corroborate 
these reports. Conditions have been made 
worse by civil war. Taxes have been col- 
lected far in advance by those in the military 
conflict. Transportation is most difficult and 
many must starve because it is impossible to 
reach them with food. Few railroads exist 
and these are neglected and broken down 
through the war period. Starvation must 
continue until the next harvest, except as 
it may be relieved by help from outside the 
famine area. 

The churches of America feel that some- 
thing must be done so far as help can be 
gotten to them. Best investigations show 
that an amount of $2,000,000 can be expended 
helpfully and economically. The Federal 
Council of Churches and the Foreign Mis- 
sions Conference of North America are sug- 
gesting that such an amount be raised, if 
possible, to be ministered under the Christian 
Council of China in the name of Christianity. 

All churches have heavy programs of 
service already demanding generous giving. 
But we believe many will want to contribute 
to this tragic need to save our starving 
friends in China. How easy each of us could 
give the price of a meal and do without it ! 
We can do this and more — and yet fulfill 
our obligations to the local and general needs 
and plans of our churches. Perhaps a little 
of the sharing of actual starvation experience 
of others will do us good. Any gifts received 
will be forwarded at once without cost for 
this purpose. 

General Mission Board, Elgin, 111. 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



69 



Huntingdon Church School 
of Missions 

The Church School of Missions held re- 
cently at the Huntingdon Church, Pa., was a 
decided success. The school was opened 
with an illustrated missionary lecture, and 
was followed by six study periods. The 
average attendance for the seven Wednes- 
day evenings was 86. The pastor, Foster B. 
Statler, Bernard King, Mrs. L. S. Knepper 
and Mrs. E. C. Bomm, were the teachers of 
the adult, young people, intermediate and 
junior groups respectively. The adult group 
had the largest number present, the junior 
group coming second, and the intermediate 
and young people taking third and fourth 
place. Every one seemed delighted with 
the studies. It is expected that another such 
study of missions will be conducted next fall. 

MISSIONGRAMS APPRECIATED 

A Special Delivery letter, received at the 
Mission Rooms, stated : " I have lost my copy 
of Missiongrams for February. Can you 
send me another for use next Sunday, the 
16th?" 

Speaking of the Worship Program in- 
cluded in Missiongrams, one writes : " I have 
found your worship program of real value 
in presenting Missiongrams." Another, "The 
program and readings that you include with 
the Missiongrams are a big help to me as 
we use all the material sent for our worship 
program the first Sunday of each month. 
Many thanks for it." 



THE MISSIONARY VISITOR 

Published Monthly by the Church of the 
Brethren through her General Mission Board. 

H. Spenser Minnich, Editor 

Ada Miller, Assistant Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS $1.00 PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH dona- 
tion of four dollars or more to the General Mission 
Board, either direct or through any congregational 
collection, provided the four dollars or more are given 
by one individual and in no way combined with 
another's gift. Different members of the same family 
may each give four dollars or more and extra sub- 
scriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent 
to persons who they know will be interested in read- 
ing the Visitor. NO VISITOR SUBSCRIPTIONS 
ARE ENTERED UNLESS REQUESTED. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription 
terms do not include a subscription for every four 
dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation 
of four dollars or more, no matter how large the 
donation. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions 
and make remittances payable to GENERAL MIS- 
SION BOARD, 22 S. STATE ST., ELGIN, ILL. 

Entered as second class matter at the postoffice at 
Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 

Membership 
OTHO WINGER, North Manchester, Ind., 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, McPherson, Kans., 1908-1934. 
H. H. NYE, Elizabethtown, Pa., 1923-1932. 
J. B. EMMERT, La Verne, Calif., 1924-1931. 
LEVI GARST, Salem, Va., R. R. 1, 1925-1930. 
J. K. MILLER, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1928-1933. 
L. C. MOOMAW, Roanoke, Va., R. R. 2, 1928-1932. 

Officers 
OTHO WINGER, President, 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, Vice-President, 1908-1934. 
CHARLES D. BONSACK, General Secretary, 1921.* 
H. SPENSER MINNICH, Assistant Secretary and 

Editor Missionary Visitor, 1918. 
M. R. ZIGLER, Home Mission Secretary, 1919. 
CLYDE M. CULP, Treasurer, 1920. 

Note. — The bold type date indicates the year when 
Board Members were first elected, the other date the 
year when Board Members' terms expire. 

* Although Bro. Bonsack was not elected secretary 
until 1921 he has been connected with the Board 
since 1906. 



• ! ■■ ! ■■! I 1 M HH -HH-r-r-H m -^-r - r - r ^^ 



The Church and Missions 

" The grave danger in the American church is that the people can be caught 
by the last immediate thing and the most obvious thing — the Main Street mentality. 
If Christianity is to be saved from this Main Street mentality it must rest back 
on the local situation, with the pastor leading. We must insist that missionary work 
is not something imposed from outside, but that it grows as a natural expression 
of the local situation. 

" We must lay the cause of missions on the soul of the local church so that the 
interest will be spontaneous. That cannot be done by boards or bishops but by 
pastors." — E. Stanley Jones. 

• H -- l"I - * - I"I"I"I"I"I"I" I "!"l - ^^ 



70 The Missionary Visitor March 



1930 



Service of Worship 



Prepared especially for the 
FOREIGN MISSIONS CONFERENCE 
■ By Dr. Wm. Chalmers Covert 
Jan. 15, 1930, Atlantic City 

The meeting having been called to order by the leader taking his place, the 
company will remain in silence and bowed in prayer till the leader rising shall read 
distinctly the 

OPENING SCRIPTURE MESSAGE: Mark 16: 15-20 

Hymn Response (Unannounced) Tune — Angelic Songs 

O Zion, haste, thy mission high fulfilling, 
To tell to all the world that God is Light, 
That he who made all nations is not willing 
One soul should perish lost in shades of night. 
Publish glad tidings, tidings of peace, 
Tidings of Jesus, redemption and release. Amen. 

PRAYER OF INVOCATION: (In unison) 

Almighty God, unto whom all hearts are open, all desires known, and from whom 
no secrets are hid; cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of thy Holy 
Spirit, that we may perfectly love thee and worthily magnify thy holy name; through 
Christ our Lord. Amen. 

Eternal God our Maker and our Lord, Giver of all grace, from whom every good 
prayer cometh, and who pourest thy Spirit upon all who seek thee; Deliver us, when 
we draw nigh to thee, from coldness of heart and wanderings of mind ; that with steadfast 
thoughts and pure affections we may worship thee in spirit and in truth; through Jesus 
Christ our Lord. Amen. 

Hymn: (Unannounced) "Lord, speak to me that I may speak" Tune — Canonbury 
OUR LORD'S PRAYER 

Hymn: (Tune — St. Agnes) 

Jesus the very thought of thee 
With sweetness fills my breast; 
But sweeter far thy face to see, 
And in thy presence rest. Amen. 

SCRIPTURE ASSURANCES AS TO PREVAILING PRAYER: The Leader 

"And all things whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer believing ye shall receive." 
Matt. 21 : 22. 

" Call unto me and I will answer thee and will show thee great things and difficult 
which thou knowest not." Jer. 33: 3. 

" Out of my distress I called upon the Lord. The Lord answered me and set me 
in a large place. The Lord is on my side, I will not fear." Psalm 118: 5-6. 

" Ask of me and I shall give thee the nations for thine inheritance and the utter- 
most parts for thine inheritance." Psalm 2: 8. 
AN INTERVAL OF INTERCESSION (If desired let special objects be presented.) 
PRAYER FOR ZEAL IN WORK: (To be repeated in unison) 

Stir me, O stir me, Lord I care not how, 
But stir my heart in passion for the world. 
Stir me to give, to go, but most to pray; 
Stir till the blood-red banner be unfurled 
O'er lands that still in deepest darkness lie, 
O'er deserts where no cross is lifted high. 

Stir me, O stir me, Lord. Thy heart was stirred 

By love's intensest fire, till thou didst give 

Thine only Son, thy best-beloved One, 

Even to the dreadful cross, that I might live; 

Stir me to give myself so back to thee 

That thou canst give thyself again through me. 

MEDITATION: Spiritual Joys in Sacrificial Service for Christ 
PRAYER FOR ONENESS IN CHRIST: (In unison) 

O God, who has made of one blood all nations of man for to dwell on the face of 
the whole earth, and didst send thy blessed Son to preach peace to them that are afar 
off and to them that are nigh ; grant that all men everywhere may seek thee and find 
thee. Bring the nations into thy fold and add them to thine inheritance. Hasten, we 
pray thee, the coming of thy kingdom, and fill all the earth with peace, friendship, and 
good will, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 
Hymn: " O Love That Will Not Let Me Go" 
Benediction 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



"Unto the Least of These" 



MINNIE F. BRIGHT 



AND they brought unto him little chil- 
dren that he might bless them." 
Did you ever see that great picture 
of the Master gathering little children about 
him, happy children, suffering children, sick 
and afflicted children, and mothers standing 
near to see if the burden of their hearts 
would be lifted with his touch? I never 
saw it like that until living in this land where 
we see so many little ones with anxious 
mothers wondering what can be done to save 
their precious babies; then I feel it must 
have been so when Jesus was on earth, and 
he was moved with compassion when he 
saw the suffering mothers and children wait- 
ing for his " touch," the touch of his hands 
and heart. I believe he was moved with the 
tenderest compassion when he saw the 
undernourished children, stunted in their 
development for the need of better food, 
better living conditions, and sick children ill 
from social evils, and preventive diseases. 
Those great loving arms of his could encircle 
the unbathed bodies, and unkempt hair of 
little children and draw them to his bosom. 
I doubt not that the vermin from little 
bodies was his also to share from such con- 
tacts. I am sure of one thing, that is that 
the neglected and suffering touched him^ far 
more than the robust, happy, well-cared-for 



children, and I presume they were as few in 
those days as we see them here today. 

A few days ago we called to see a little 
child, the pride of its parents' hearts for it 
is an only son and their years are past forty, 
so they count him a son of their " old age." 
Tenderly the mother held her precious child, 
great tears streaming down her face for 
dysentery had made a terrible hold already 
and it seemed the babe could not live long. 
The doctor was told about the family and 
their poverty, and instructed to care for the 
child's needs and the expense would be cared 
for. After several days the mother came 
with tears of joy saying that the baby 
was better. We told her to thank God for 
the blessing and to keep in touch with the 
doctor for the continued needs of the baby. 

Another mother comes cautiously in at 
the door leaving her little child outside. 
" He has sore throat and I'm afraid it 
might be diphtheria. We have been told 
that it is contagious and I want to be care- 
ful that no other child should take the 
disease from him if it proves to be diph- 
theria." " Take him to the hospital at once," 
she was told, " and let the doctor examine 
him." It was diphtheria and anti-toxin saved 
the child's life. They were too poor to meet 




Photo by Mrs. Bright. 

Some of the Poor Women Who Do Industrial Work 



72 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



the expense of the medicine and it was met 
otherwise. 

" Heavenly Grace, my little son, oh, that 
you would grow like other children! Here 
you are soon a year old and cannot sit 
alone. My nurse is not sufficient for you. 
I give you sugar water but it does not help. 
Your little body is growing thinner and 
thinner," and she strokes the wasting body 
with her loving hand. " Is there nothing to 
be done for you?" she wails. In time the 
baby is given malted milk and cod-liver 
oil. It responds beautifully and after some 
months of this nourishing treatment he can 
take gruels and today is a husky little fellow, 
the joy and pride of the home. It was a 
little thing to do for the mother but she 
could not meet the expense of malted milk 
and cod-liver oil. It, too, was met otherwise. 

These represent thousands and thousands 
of crying children, crying from physical suf- 
fering, ignorance of mothers, suffering 
malnutrition, dysentery, and other diseases 
waiting for the Master's " touch." A few 
have had the touch of his hand upon them 
but oh, the long train of waiting mothers 
clutching helplessly to wasting little lives! 
The task is stupendous ! Mothers' hearts are 
breaking, mutely pleading for his great lov- 
ing arms to encircle their children with 
blessing. 

A young woman comes in and sits down. 
I have known her for a long while. She 
has three lovely children, two sons and a 
little daughter. For some time it has been 
evident that she is suffering something 
unusual but not until a few days ago did 
she reveal her real sorrow. In confidence 
she revealed her bitter grief to me. Her hus- 
band was untrue to her and she felt that 
her sorrow was greater than she could bear 
and felt that she could not live. She was 
contemplating taking her life, for what was 
life to her now! Just a poor, disgraced, 
despised wife ! No way to escape the agony 
that enthralled her. Her own life was clean 
and above reproach and she did her part 
in being thrifty, but what could be said to 
comfort this poor woman, her heart break- 
ing with earth's bitterest sorrow? "Your 
life may be bound with custom which does 
not give you the freedom you rightfully 
deserve but heaven cannot be bound. Turn 



your heart toward God who loves you, and 
to the good Master who gave his life for 
you. Pray to him for strength every day 
to help you live right. They cannot keep 
the best gifts of life from you," were some 
of the words said in trying to heal her 
wounded heart. In her tears she said, " I 
pray to God every day to help me." We 
gave her a way to help herself earn a little 
money with which to support herself. Her 
sad life is the story of many a helpless wife 
and mother bound by the pitiless power of 
custom, spending their sad lives behind walls 
in dark and cheerless homes waiting for 
the warm "touch" of the Master to lift up, 
their faces and bring courage to their broken 
hearts. 

In the hospital lying on a bed of suffering 
is a woman sinking with T. B. Perhaps her 
life can be saved and perhaps not. The 
dreadful fever rises every day. She is a 
young mother who has felt the " touch " of 
him in her life and has her face turned 
toward a " better place." She is poor in 
this world's goods and could not go into 
the hospital were it not that the means 
were provided for her. But here is a bed 
donated for the use of the poor who could 
not otherwise have the privilege of medical 
care. Here she rests her tired body, has 
good food, and proper medical care. Other 
sick and suffering mothers will use the bed 
as the months come and go; mothers who 
could not enter the hospital perhaps because 
of poverty will find rest and hope here and 
hear of the good Master who is full of tender 
compassion. 

These children who are waiting for the 
Master's touch and mothers who are wait- 
ing for the hope of his countenance are some 
of the " least of these " we have been trying 
to help. Through the industrial work a 
number of mothers and children have been 
receiving blessings physically and spiritually. 
Sick and impoverished children have been 
nourished back to health. Mothers are 
taught how to care for their children. 
Faithful teachers lead them to know the 
Master and teach them to read the Story 
of Love. We feel it is, and has been, a 
humble means of bringing the warm 
" touch " of blessing to a large number. 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



73 



It's Great to Be a Missionary 



A. D. HELSER* 



OH, it's great to be out where the fight is 
strong 
To be out where the heavy troops be- 
long, 
To fight for man and God. 
It seams the face and it tires the brain, 
And it strains the arm until one's friend is 

pain, 
But it's great to be out where the fight is 

strong, 
To be out where the heavy troops belong, 
To fight for man and God. 

The romance wears out and the strange 
newness becomes repulsive unless Christ is 
all in all. And even then try as I will there 
are times when the devil gives me cold feet 
even in Africa. But with all that I wouldn't 
be anything but a missionary. My brothers 
out there need me and I need them. I have 
seen Christ in my brothers in Africa and my 
deepest passion is that they may see him in 
me. 

The sun can mirror his glorious face 

In the dewdrop on the sod 

And the humblest negro heart reflect 

The life and love of God. 
It is not because of the money I get. 
Those who know best know how small the 
missionary's allowance is. It is not because 
of the privilege to travel. I have been a 
missionary only seven short years and I am 
fed up on traveling. I think it is great to 
be a missionary because of the good I can 
do. I cannot do much but I sort'a feel that 



Missionary to Africa. Now on furlough in America. 



every little bit helps— helps to give new 
hope, helps to bring healing, helps to make 
the love of Christ known. 

It's great to cultivate the friendship of 
Christ and to really care as he cares. My 
little four year old girl had a pet cat in 
Africa. It was a cross breed between our 
common house cat and the wild cat of the 
bush. Esther May loved her pussy and was 
careful to feed it and to give it a nice place 
in which to sleep. One day as I came hurry- 
ing through the door I stumbled over it and 
gave it a kick. With a sigh of grief she 
said, "Oh Daddy!" How it hurt her! It 
was a lesson to me and I asked myself 
whether I was hurt by the things which hurt 
him. 

It's great to really care as he cares for 
that host of children who walk from day to 
day within the awful shadow of fear and 
death. It's great to see little skinny, dirty, 
ignorant boys and girls made into plump, 
clean, capable young men and women. It's 
great to see filthy lepers, on whom a curse 
is sealed, become clean and free. 

The hungry are fed by introducing new 
crops, by improving their methods of farm- 
ing, and by urging the old men to use their 
corn for food instead of beer. The thirsty 
are satisfied from wells of sparkling water. 
The stranger is welcomed and taken in. The 
naked (and we have a lot of them) are 




Photo by Albert Helser. 

AFRICAN SERVICE. 



Brother Kulp preaching 



74 The Missionary Visitor M i93o h 

clothed by teaching them how to raise better her but a few months ago and she said 

cotton and how to weave better cloth. The with conviction, " I still love him and expect 

sick are visited and healed. The unfortunate to follow him." When the fire of heaven 

are loved and encouraged. The hope of a is kindled in the human soul there is light 

new life in Christ fires the eye and thrills and life and hope. 

the soul under every sky. And he says, " In- ' You are right, some are not faithful. 

asmuch as ye did it unto one of these, even But God has not promised skies always blue, 

these least, ye did it unto me." Flower strewn pathways all our lives through. 

r~ « . . „. God has not promised sun without rain, 

Turyankur, a very intelligent young Joy without sorrow> peace without pain . 

woman, came one day and wanted to make But God has promised strength for the day, 

her vow to follow Christ until death. She Rest for the labor and light for the way. 
was dragged away over the stony path that It's great to be a missionary and I wouldn't 

led to a heathen home, where she was bound be anything in this wide world but a mis- 

and whipped by her own family. I saw sionary. 

Enlarging Your Missionary Horizon 

1. How are the missionaries meeting the needs of the "least of these"? Page 71. 

2. Why is it "Great to Be a Missionary"? Page 73. 

3. Why is the Department of Agriculture interested in the missionary? Page 66. 

4. What is the immediate need of China, according to Governor Yen? Page 66. 

5. Are missionaries interested in the football championship, the stock market, and Baby 
Martins? Page 67. 

6. What are Gandhi's views on industrialization, non-violence and machinery as such? 
Page 67. 

7. What are the churches in America advising concerning the famine conditions in 
China? Page 68. 

8. According to E. Stanley Jones, who can adequately present missions to the local 
church? Page 69. 

9. Does the newspaper attitude on missions affect volunteers? Page 75. 

10. Does China want Christ and the missionaries? Page 75. 

11. How do Bethany volunteers cooperate with the practical work department of the 
school? Page 76. 

12. How have the Bridgewater volunteers expressed their missionary spirit? Page 77. 

13. What is the Elizabethtown student missionary project for 1930? Page 77. 

14. Do the Juniata students respond to the semi-weekly devotional meetings? Page 77. 

15. How do the La Verne volunteers keep alive to the world situations? Page 78. 

16. What are the plans of Mount Morris volunteers for deputation work? Page 78. 

17. How was Christmas celebrated at Liao Chou? Page 80. 

18. What are the evidences of the disappearance of the anti-Christian spirit in the Ping 
Ting Chou Girls' School? Page 80. 

19. What education is provided for the high school and college students of Tai Yuan dur- 
ing vacation? Page 81. 

.20. How was the New Year welcomed by the missionaries at Tai Yuan? Page 81. 

21. What are some of the temptations met by school girls in their homes? Page 81. 

22. How did the Johnstown Women's Missionary Society bring joy to mission children 
at Shou Yang? Page 81. 

23. How can our young people go abroad during 1930 ? Page 82. 

24. What fund is to be raised by the children during 1930? Page 83. 

25. How many missionary children are there under sixteen years of age? Page 85. 

26. What is the date of the World Day of Prayer? Page 87. 

27. What are the " Just Like You Stories " ? Page 88. 

28. Were the African curios appreciated by the junior groups? Page 89. 

29. In what sense is the missionary child a "Child of Two Nations"? Page 90. 

30. Who are the winners of the missionary picture story contest? Page 91. 

31. Tell how one little girl of India became a leader of her people. Page 92. 

32. Tell of the experiences of one junior group working for Our African Brothers. Page 
94. 

33. What is the amount of the Conference Budget for 1930-1931 ? Page 95. 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



75 



Volunteer 

Talk 



" If we love 


one an- 


other, God abide th 


in 


us, and his 


love 


is 


perfected in 


us. - 


-1 


Jno. 4: 12b. 







Devoted to the Interest or Volunteers 



" Love is the only 
eye that visions God. 
With this wonderful 
eye of love, God and 
man behold one an- 
o ther" — Toyohiko 
Kagawa, the out- 
standing Christian of, 
Asia. 



Vol. XI 



Published occasionally during the school year by the GENERAL 
MISSION BOARD, Church of the Brethren, Elgin, Illinois 



No. 4 



Should You Volunteer? 

MRS. BERTHA BUTTERBAUGH* 



DOUBTLESS many of you experience 
at times an itchy feeling that you 
ought to be a missionary. But the job 
looks difficult ; most of the fields are far from 
home, the work is not among white people, and 
you would have to do without many of the 
comforts and luxuries of the U. S. A., so 
you have welcomed the chance to scratch 
the bothersome itch with such newspaper 
headlines as : " Missionaries No Longer 
Needed in India," " Nationals Prepared to 
Take Over Their Own Christian Work in 
China," and " Save America First." And so 
you have complacently decided to settle 
down in the good old U. S. A. and make 
your life as big as possible there. Would 
that I could stimulate that itch to such a 
degree that for many of you nothing short 
of complete surrender of your life to God, 
and volunteering for his work over seas, 
would give you relief. You may find many 
reasons for not going out to the foreign 
field, but if you are honest with yourself, 
you cannot be content to stay at home be- 
cause some newspaper reporter makes a 
general statement that you are not needed, 
or because of some adverse advice from a 
church leader at home whose heart and 
soul are not sold to our foreign mission work. 

In my contacts with the volunteers and 



Returned Missionary from India 



youth of our church I have been convinced 
that they like to do difficult things. Let me 
tell you that service on the foreign field is 
difficult — there is nothing easy about it — but 
that is one reason why it looks attractive 
to me. "The essential grip of Christian 
idealism is not in its ease of application, but 
its difficulty," says Winifred Kirland, " and 
it is the intrepidity of human aspiration. The 
Christian ideal is vitalizing; it is not a 
cuddling to our weakness, but a challenge 
to our strength." 

E. T. Paul, possessed with a right and 
true nationalistic spirit for his people, com- 
petent to go his own way in representing 
Christ in India, says : " Let there be no illu- 
sion. India is not crying out for baptism, 
but what has happened is a frank, manly 
recognition by India of Christ, and a will- 
ingness to know more about him. It is the 
psychological condition for which many 
heroic missionaries and Indian Christians 
have prayed and laid down their lives in the 
daily humdrum of unnoticed service. As to 
missionaries," he continues, " their life and 
their service are still needed. We need you. 
We are not ashamed to own that we need 
you. Perhaps before the day is done you 
will see that we needed you." 

Some of you are going, some sooner, some 
later — long distances, far abroad — scorning 



76 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



softness, isolation, danger, self interest, go- 
ing to serve the urgent needs of mankind, 
for we know that in no other way can it 
be done — this all embracing task of making 



this earth a new place in which to live. I 
know you feel this with me — May God send 
you quickly. There is much to be done 
across the seas. 



Our College Groups Write 



BETHANY 

Some one has enlarged upon this wise and 
cheerful saying : " Cast your bread upon the 
waters, and after many days it will return 
unto you — buttered." What we give always 
comes back to us, with splendid additions. 
What we give, we have; what we withhold, 
we lose. Treasures in Heaven are still 
richer treasures on earth. 

The Bethany volunteers number about 
fifty home and seventeen foreign. However, 
at Bethany every student is a volunteer even 
though he has not signed the pledge card 
because he is here in preparation for Chris- 
tian service. 

Our meetings are held bimonthly on Fri- 
day evening in the chapel. It has been our 
happy privilege to have Brethren Bonsack 
and Minnich from Elgin and also Mr. Moss, 
a representative from the Committee of 
Reference and Counsel, speak to us. That 
these meetings are vital can be proved in 
this remark from a volunteer : " One can't 
help being different after being in such a 
meeting and associating with such person- 
alities." 

Giving requires much heroism, but only 
at the start. After a while the blessings 
begin to come in so fast that we long for 
more giving, and yet more. Should you ask 
a Bethany volunteer to verify that statement, 
I believe each one could truthfully do so, 
for we cooperate with the practical work 
department in doing religious work. Fellow 
reader, you should see the pathos and sor- 
row furrowed in faces of nearly 5,000 men 
and women who have lost home, friends, or 
missed their mark in life, and now anxiously 
await the message of some kind, sympathetic 
worker who will visit them in their so called 
abode, the County Home ; or go with us 
to the Gospel Loop Mission, a little room 
in the heart of the city where wanderers 
are sometimes rescued. Just the other morn- 
ing in chapel we heard that 600 men found 
Christ in that mission in 1929. Does it re- 



quire heroism? Yes! Then go with us into 
the communities of Douglas and Hastings 
Street Missions where the Sunday afternoon 
movie is far more attractive to the children 
than the Christ we adore, or visit in the 
County Hospital where over 3,000 disease 
riven persons, some friendless and homeless, 
await the kind smile of some Christian 
worker who visits them. Then, too, we find 
ample opportunity to be foreign missionaries 
just outside our doors. The Jews like our 
Christ if we know how to present him. The 
Chinese accept and worship him too, and to 
be a worker in the Chinese Sunday-school 
is a real challenge. It requires heroism of 
the highest type to illumine the face of a 
Chinese pupil who cannot speak English and 
to help him understand and speak our lan- 
guage. A far bigger and grander challenge 
came in this request from a Chinese boy 
recently : " Teach me more about Jesus." All 
of these opportunities and many more have 
enriched and heightened the interest of our 
group so much that when Bro. Guy West 
in a brief but challenging chapel talk pre- 
sented our annual missionary project, the 
faculty and student body were in tune. The 
result totaled $350 in pledges and $350 in 
cash. This report was wired to Bro. Paul 
Rupel, whose work we are supporting, and 
who was then awaiting the embarking on 
the Deutschland en route to Africa. 

Our group received letters from the Rupels 
during their sea voyage. You, too, might 
enjoy some echoes. Paul said: "Seasickness 
is something like this : you first feel goofy 
in the head, then about an hour later you 
try to eat a bowl of soup and there is a 
hot debate in the ' Department of the In- 
terior ' and it continues until you have it 
out." Naomi adds that the difficulty in 
ordering meals, when meals are ordered, is 
to make the German waiters understand 
your wants ; and sometimes a slip is made, 
especially when the boat gives a sudden 
lurch and dishes, chairs, and stewards go 
sailing down the aisle together. 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



77 



In addition to the full programs of per- 
sonal work in the city there have been 
about thirteen churches visited by groups 
of volunteers throughout Indiana and Illinois 
where programs were rendered in keeping 
with the coming celebration of Pentecostal 
year. 

We have been blessed abundantly by be- 
ing privileged to meet and hear such men as 
Robert E. Speer, John R. Mott, and Dr. 
Grenfell, the Missionary to Labrador. To 
drink from the experiences of such person- 
alities is a coveted privilege we wish could 
be passed on to each reader. 

Should you become discouraged with life, 
look about you and help some one who is 
in need. The world is teeming with bleed- 
ing humanity. Would you be helpful? Then 
with a sympathetic, compassionate heart may 
it be said of you, as it was said of the 
Christ, " You went about doing good." 

BRIDGEWATER 

The dawning of the new year has brought 
more and more challenges for Christian serv- 
ice. With the opening of the second semes- 
ter of school work, plans have already been 
made for the deputation work. The work 
done last semester is very gratifying. All the 
programs given were strong and well pre- 
pared. One team visited seven churches dur- 
ing the Christmas holidays, and brought in- 
spiring messages to many listeners. The total 
number of churches visited last semester was 
thirteen. Several members of the different 
teams have expressed themselves as feeling 
that they have really helped some of their 
fellow-men, and that they have gained a 
stronger desire to be found more definitely 
in his service. 

Some of the themes that have been used 
for the work are : " Making Christ Real," 
" Sowing Ourselves in Life's Soil," and " Be- 
ginning at Jerusalem." The programs have 
consisted of short talks emphasizing the 
great need of supporting our mission work, 
special music, usually mixed quartets, read- 
ings, and devotions. Emphasis has been 
placed upon our personal responsibility in 
meeting the deficit in mission work, and 
what it will mean if we fail. 

There have been five new recruits to our 
group up to this time. Four of these have 
signed the associate membership cards and 



one has made the pledge for definite Chris- 
tian service. 

The plans for our financial project are just 
being launched. It was thought best to 
leave this work till the new semester had 
opened. At the present time an effort is 
being made to have a committee, represent- 
ing all the religious organizations on the 
campus, and the faculty, survey the field of 
each organization and define its work in 
order that better and more effective work 
may be accomplished. 

ELIZABETHTOWN 

We have been kept busy in deputation 
work during the first semester. Up to the 
present time, Jan. 27, teams have visited ten 
congregations and at least eleven others have 
called for programs. The audiences are 
very responsive and we feel that deputation 
work is a means of deepening the missionary 
interest both of the congregations and of 
the volunteers themselves. 

We have not yet planned our group pro- 
grams for the second semester. During our 
recent Bible Institute the volunteers at 
Elizabethtown had the privilege of listening 
to M. R. Zigler, Rufus Bowman, and M. J. 
Brougher. A. D. Helser, just recently re- 
turned from Africa, was on the campus the 
latter part of the week and challenged large 
audiences with the needs of Africa. 

One very interesting program that we 
enjoyed during the semester was an evening 
in which Rev. C. F. Jenkins, colored, pastor 
of a church in Harrisburg, and a senior in 
our college, spoke on " Racial Relationships." 

We will present our project to the stu- 
dents and faculty early in February and we 
hope with their support and part of our 
deputation receipts to raise at least $400.00 
for the work of Sara Shisler in Africa. 

May God give to all of his people a 
greater vision of the world's needs and of 
Christ's ability to meet them. As we seek 
to bring Christ into the lives of others, he 
will become more real to us. 

JUNIATA 

Juniata volunteers are in the midst of a 
busy deputation program for the churches in 
the constituency of the college. Under the 
direction of Esther Harley, eleven teams 



78 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



have presented programs in thirty-one 
churches. The teams each have a different 
personnel, thereby giving every qualified 
student volunteer an opportunity to serve. 

It is also a joy to note the fine response 
volunteers are having in their semi-weekly 
devotional meetings. The invitation for 
everyone to attend is accepted by an average 
of 20% of the student body. For example, 
note the attendance as recorded four times 
in succession; Thursday evening 112, Mon- 
day evening 86, Thursday evening 98, and 
Monday evening 115. We believe a special 
attraction at these services is the singing 
of good gospel songs. With Dan Ziegler as 
chorister and Caroline Didden at the piano, 
we have efficient leadership, a factor that is 
not to be ignored in spiritual singing. 

As many new members have been added 
to the group this year as were lost by 
last year's graduating class. We have about 
twenty associate members and fifteen full- 
fledged members, a total of thirty-five. 

We have not been unmindful of the 
special drive in the church for missionary 
money to eradicate the deficit. As programs 
are presented in churches, we have our 
special plea to give freely for our student 
project of $900 for H. Stover Kulp. At a 
recent service a good lady had given her 
mite in the collection basket, but as the 
service ended she decided to give more. 
She came forward and added a $5.00 bill with 
a testimony. Truly, if this spirit would pre- 
vail in more of the hearts of the brethren 
our financial troubles would be solved. 

LA VERNE 

Two deputation teams of five members 
each were sent from La Verne College 
during Christmas holidays. One team visited 
eighteen congregations in the Northern Dis- 
trict of California ; the other went to 
Phoenix and Glendale, Arizona. The South- 
ern team also gave several programs in 
Southern California, not taking the place of 
the deputation work in the churches nearer 
the college. The theme, " The Satisfying 
Christ," was used by both teams. Special 
music, a short talk, and a playlet, " Living 
Waters," made up the main part of the 
program, which was inspirational in type. 
The playlet was a new feature in our 
deputation work here, and was well received, 
on the whole. 



The offerings approximated $250.00, a con- 
siderable share of which necessarily went 
for car expenses. Over three thousand miles 
were traveled by both teams. 

Each member considers it a valuable op- 
portunity and real privilege to have been 
one of the deputation teams. The new 
friendships, the royal hospitality shown in 
the many homes, and the good fellowship in 
the various churches are chief among the 
benefits. There was much fun too which we 
will not soon forget. 

Although our group has not conducted any 
special line of mission study, it has been 
our aim to keep alive to the world situations 
and take an active interest in the cause of 
Christ throughout the world. This has been 
done mainly in our regular weekly meetings. 
Letters from several in the foreign fields 
have kept us in touch with situations there. 
Members of our group are selected by the 
Missionary Committee of the local church, 
to read the monthly missionary news, and 
in this way have a definite contact with the 
general work of the church. Our group also 
had charge of a prayer meeting service. 

We have a volunteer library, but it has 
not seen a great deal of use. We aim to 
utilize it more efficiently than we have 
been doing. It is our plan to secure a 
permanent section on the student bulletin 
board, where we may give this, and other 
activities, publicity. 

We work with the school Y. W. C. A. 
and Y. M. C. A. in the selection of the 
deputation teams. We are also affiliated 
with the United Student Volunteer Union 
of Southern California, and find our fellow- 
ship with them in conferences and retreats 
to be very helpful and inspirational. 

Weekly prayer meetings in Mexican homes 
are a part of our local mission work. We 
are also considering giving Sunday after- 
noon programs in a near-by neighborhood 
where there is no church. 

There is real joy in service, as is evinced 
by the hearty cooperation of the group, and 
we welcome any suggestions which may 
lead us into a larger service for him. 

MOUNT MORRIS 

The Volunteer Group of Mt. Morris Col- 
lege is showing much interest and enthusi- 
asm. Our meetings are held every other 
Thursday evening, with an average attend- 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



79 



ance of thirty. Short snappy programs are 
given, yet they are very helpful. Our pro- 
grams vary. Sometimes missionary problems 
are discussed; musical programs and playlets 
are also given. Much interest is shown by 
both the faculty and students. 

Our deputation work is in the hands of 
two teams : Ralph Petry, Francis Shenefelt, 
Mark Burner, Ruby Burner, and Estelle 
West; the other team being: John Master- 
son, D. L. Butler, Edwin Schrock, Neva 
Root, Pauline Stutsman, and Marie Thomp- 
son. Good work is being done by both 
teams. Our plans are to visit a number of 
churches within a radius of about eighty 
miles of the college. A few churches already 
have been visited. 

We recognize the big tasks before us as 
volunteers, and are attempting to live the 
Christlike life here on our campus. There 
is a big place in the world for volunteers, 
not only in the missionary fields abroad, but 
here in the mission field of our own com- 
munities and school. We are extending 
our best wishes to like groups of our 
brotherhood, and wish you Godspeed in 



his work. Will you pray that our lives may 
be wholly devoted to the spreading of 
Christ's Kingdom? 

Student Fellowship Missionary 
Project 

For many years the students of our col- 
leges have annually raised a sum of money 
for some specific missionary purpose. Last 
year and this, student have been inclined 
to contribute toward the missionary expense 
of an alumnus now on the field of service. 
This year the following plans are going into 
effect: Bethany being linked with Paul 
Rupel, by raising $700 toward his work 
budget. Bridgewater will cooperate in a 
similar way with Naomi Rupel, in Africa. 
Elizabethtown will raise $400 for Sara 
Shisler's work. Juniata, $900 for H. Stover 
Kulp's work. Manchester and La Verne will 
raise sums toward the expense of Brother 
Helser's work. McPherson is cooperating 
with Frank Crumpacker. Mt. Morris de- 
cided to raise a special fund for the mission 
deficit. The plans of the other schools are 
not yet announced. 



News from the Fields 



CHINA 
Liao Chou 

Mrs. E. M. Wampler 
A Busy Month 

for the Mission Family 

December is always a busy month for 
the missionaries. There are the year's ac- 
counts to settle, Christmas programs to plan 
and prepare, various committee meetings 
planning for the activities of the coming 
year, besides the many little things to be 
done in connection with the customary keep- 
ing of the day. The foreign children are not 
forgotten, for how are they to catch the 
spirit of the occasion that has always been 
precious to us if special features are not 
prepared for them in the language of their 
mother tongue? 

How Christmas Was Commemorated 
at Liao Chou 

The Christmas programs were begun with 
a play at the Women's Bible school on 
Sunday afternoon, a scene of the Nativity. 
Monday evening the girls' school gave a 
play, " No Room at the Inn." Tuesday eve- 
ning the boys' school gave a scene from 
Dickens' " Christmas Carol." Wednesday a 
Christmas program was given at the church, 
mostly singing and short talks. The for- 



eigners of the station were all invited to take 
Christmas dinner with the Wamplers. In 
the afternoon the foreign children gave us 
a program, the main feature being a scene 
with the Cratchet family. 

Facing a New Year 
of Opportunities 

As we approach the threshold of another 
year we are impressed anew with the tre- 
mendous responsibility and opportunity that 
is ours these days in China. Never was 
the call greater for Christlike living. As 
we face the unknown future of the New 
Year with all its political uncertainty of the 
present day may we have your earnest 
prayers for a faith that sees God in his 
Heaven and realizes that the future is always 
as bright as the promises of God. 

School Children Home 
for Christmas 

On the morning of December 21, at 6:30 
o'clock, the Liao auto started out on an 
eighty mile trip across the snow-covered 
mountains, with the mercury at six degrees 
below zero. The snow does not please the 
heart of the driver over these roads as there 
is no other vehicle used here with a track 
as wide as the auto. But the case was 



80 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



urgent, for the children were coming home 
for Christmas. This was their first year 
away from home. Fern Sollenberger, aged 
sixteen, and Sara Anna Wampler, aged 
twelve, are the Liao representatives in the 
American school at T'ung Chou, near 
Peking. They have three weeks' vacation 
but due to poor train connection and other 
causes they will have to spend more than 
a week of this time traveling. Can you 
guess who is the happier over this home- 
coming, parent or child? 

Heavy Snows 

Promise Abundant Crops 

We are already having considerable snow- 
fall and the temperature falling around ten 
degrees below zero at places. While our 
sympathies go out to the millions of suffer- 
ing, starving people in this land, whose suf- 
ferings are intensified by the cold, we are 
grateful for the snow which gives promise 
of more abundant crops for the coming 
season. 

PING TING CHOU 

Emma Horning 

Communion Service Becomes 
More Significant Each Year 

In the city we held three inquirers' classes 
in December. Bro. - Yin taught the men, 
Sister Metzger the school girls, and Sister 
Horning the women. As a result twenty- 
three were baptized in the new baptistry in 
the church Dec. 23. The baptizing took 
place in the forenoon. In the afternoon 160 
participated in the love feast and com- 
munion. Some said this was the best service 
of this kind we have ever had, for all the 
communicants were so quiet and thoughtful. 
Year after year they realize more of the 
meaning of this sacred ordinance and enter 
more fully into its spiritual significance. 

Two Workers Brave the Cold 
to Reach Outlying Village 

Sister Schaeffer and Brother Crumpacker 
spent two weeks holding a Bible class for 
the Christians of Kao Lao. Twenty-five 
attended the class, coming from a number 
of the surrounding villages. Although the 
weather was cold the average was nineteen. 
This place is two days by donkey over the 
mountains and the people are extremely 
rural but make zealous Christian workers. 
When they returned home the wind was icy 
cold, for snow covered the ground. Animals 
travel very slowly, and this seems especially 
so in cold weather. The workers walked a 
good share of the way to keep from freezing. 

Antichristian Spirit 

Disappearing in Girls' School 

Sister Metzger reports that the girls' 
school has had a different atmosphere re- 



cently. For some years there has been some 
antichristian spirit prevalent, making it 
hard for the few Christian students. This 
year one of the girls tried to lead others to 
ridicule things religious, but her efforts were 
fruitless. The teachers at one of their 
regular meetings made this the subject of 
special prayer. The result was that one of 
the girls stepped out boldly for truth and 
righteousness, asking for baptism and special 
instruction in Christianity. She led others to 
the class and the Christian girls attended 
also. These classes continued for three 
weeks with genuine interest, for all were 
eager to learn. On Dec. 23, three of these 
were baptized, also one who graduated from 
our school in 1928. We feel that the school 
has had a baptism of the Holy Spirit. 

Christmas Observance 
at Liao Chou 

At forenoon services on Christmas day the 
church was packed with men, women and 
children. The program consisted of special 
music and short talks. The music was es- 
pecially well prepared and much appreciated, 
particularly that given by the children. 
After the children left the church the re- 
maining part of the audience, some three 
hundred, had a social time together, drinking 
tea, eating peanuts, and listening to the 
victrola music. The school children had 
their treat at the schools. A collection of 
$22.00 was taken to be given to the poor of 
the church and community. In the after- 
noon several short plays were given illus- 
trating the meaning of Christmas and other 
Bible incidents. 



Parents Look Forward to 

Christmas with Their Children 

Fern Sollenberger and Sara Anna Wamp- 
ler came home from school to spend 
Christmas with their parents at Liao, but 
Calvin Bright of this station was detained 
because of sickness. This was a great dis- 
appointment to us for we have so few mis- 
sion children now. Christmas does not mean 
much without children. His parents were 
especially disappointed for this is the first 
time he has been away to school so they 
were looking forward with much pleasure to 
his being with them during the holidays. 

Hospital Record 
Is Encouraging 

The hospital shows a large increase in 
patients over last year. 

Last This 

year year 

Dispensary patients, daily average, 20 30 

Inpatients, daily average 20 40 

Obstetric cases 52 83 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



81 



Tai Yuan 

Sarah Myers 

Christmas Services 
at Tai Yuan 

We had a fitting Christmas sermon on 
Sunday before Christmas by Mr. Li of the 
English Baptist mission. Special music was 
rendered both by Chinese and foreigners and 
everybody seemed to enjoy the occasion. 
The Protestant churches of the city held a 
joint Christmas service in one of the 
churches the day before Christmas. 



Newcomer Welcomed to 
American Group 

Our small American group is pleased to 
have an addition to its number in the person 
of Mrs. P. L. Gillett of Colorado Springs, 
Colorado, who has come to join her husband, 
the foreign Y. M. C. A. secretary of our city. 

Educational Program Provided 
for Students on Vacation 

Owing to the long winter vacation of the 
high schools and colleges of Tai Yuan, about 
two months, the Y. M. C. A. has arranged 
a Vacation Institute for the students who 
remain in the city. Both Chinese and for- 
eign speakers and leaders will present dis- 
cussions in sociology, political science, youth 
movements in different countries, general 
science, religion, English, music and art. It 
is hoped this opportunity for educational 
advancement and social fellowship will be a 
real character building blessing to many, 
and keep them free from evil temptations 
during this long period when they have 
nothing to do. 



Fitting New 
Year Services 

A very inspiring watch night service was 
enjoyed by nearly all the missionaries of the 
city as the old year passed out and the new 
year came in. After refreshments at about 
11:25, there was music consisting of special 
selections and congregational singing. One 
of the ministers read several passages of 
Scripture and led our thoughts with most 
fitting remarks. Just before midnight we 
were in prayer, thanking God for the many 
past blessings and asking forgiveness for the 
old year's sins and selfishness. When the 
clock struck twelve we were engaged in 
silent prayer. Immediately after, the Father 
was beseeched for new faith, larger vision, 
Holy Spirit guidance, and more Christlike- 
ness in our personal lives and efforts for his 
Kingdom. We came away feeling that it 
was not only good for us of kindred faith to 
be together as a group, but to be together 
with the Lord. 



Shou Yang 

Sue R. Heisey 
School Girls Meet 

Temptations in Their Homes 

A couple days following Christmas, Sisters 
Clapper and Neher walked out several li to 
visit some of the former school girls in two 
villages which lay close together in the hills. 
In one home where the father as well as the 
girl and her husband are Christian, a little 
service was held with the family. If one may 
judge from the prayer of the father and the 
tears of his daughter during prayer, the Lord 
touched their hearts. Pray that the Spirit 
may continue to warm and strengthen their 
hearts, for the father in this home has been 
very indifferent in his attitude toward the 
church. 

In the other village the other school girl, 
a very dear girl and a lover of the Lord 
Jesus, who has never been baptized because 
of the opoosition in her home, was found 
sick with every symptom of the dread dis- 
ease " T. B." The girl is very unhappily 
married and has a heart burdened with sor- 
row. She shed tears of joy at the sight of 
Sister Clapper, her former principal, for she 
had not even heard that Sister Clapper had 
returned. What a joy to point such bur- 
dened hearts to a loving, satisfying Savior. 

Christian Man Yields 
to Temptation — Repents 

One of the Christian men who is a day 
laborer, was overcome by the temptation 
of his landlord and was fined and put in jail 
for selling opium. He has a good record in 
his village and deported himself so well in 
the jail that he was very early let out on 
parole. He has to pay the jailor ten cents 
for every day he is away. In the meantime 
his aged mother has passed on to her reward. 
This makes it doubly hard for Bro. Chang. 
He realizes his sin and seems to be very 
penitent. Because he has no money to pay 
his fine he will have to serve forty days extra 
in the jail. In this event one day's confine- 
ment in the jail is reckoned at one dollar. 

Children Made Happy 
by Women's Group, Pa. 

The Christmas season has come and gone 
again with the usual amount of happiness 
which the glorious day brings. Through the 
generosity of the Women's Missionary So- 
ciety of the Roxbury church at Johnstown, 
every boy and girl in the lower primary co- 
educational school, was given a present from 
America. Among the gifts were : doll, top, 
mouth harp, and pieces of fragrant toilet 
soap with a fancy washcloth. How these do 
delight the eye and the heart of the Chinese 
boy and girl ! As most of the children of 
this school are quite small, a few songs, reci- 
tations, and Bible Readings, together with 
the presentation of the gifts, commemorated 
(Continued on Page 89) 



82 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



^** The editor invite* helpful contributions for this department of the Visitor 



Young People Go Abroad * 

B. Y. P. D. Missionary Project, 1930 

C. H. SHAMBERGER* 




FOR a number of years B. Y. P. D. 
groups have been going abroad. Two 
years ago they went to India to help 
in a program of evangelism. They worked 
with college students from the schools of 
the Church of the Brethren. In 1929 they 
went to three different continents, some to 
Africa, some to China and others to India. 
How They Went 
Of course they didn't really go in person. 
They made it possible for others to go and 
do what was needed. They sent money. 
Not vast sums of money as we might think 
of it, but several thousand dollars. Some 
groups sent only a few dollars. In some of 



Director of Young People's Activities, Church of 
the Brethren. 



the colleges it ran into hundreds of dollars. 
One group decided to try to raise twenty 
dollars. They actually sent in twenty-eight 
dollars and twenty-five cents. They found 
so much satisfaction in doing it that they 
are going to do it again this year. 
What They Did 

The plan in 1929 was that the money 
should be used to help make possible the 
work of certain missionaries. It did not go 
toward their salary. That is met otherwise. 
But every missionary is responsible for a 
certain type of work. His work costs more 
than his salary and the church has to pro- 
vide money for his work or there would be 
no use having him go. It averages about 
$1,200 per missionary each year. 

Now the only way to tell what was done 
would be to list whom each different group 
decided to help. That would be a long 
process. Most of those who had a part in 
the 1929 project received letters from the 
missionaries whom they helped. 

Some group probably made some bandages, 
pills or other medicines possible for Dr. 
Robertson at Garkida, in Africa. Some may 
have made it possible for Nettie Senger to 
reach more Chinese women with the Gospel 
message than she could have without their 
support. While another B. Y. P. D. may 
have made it possible for Ira Moomaw to 
teach more boys in the Anklesvar Indus- 
trial School in India. 

What It Did for Them 

Every B. Y. P. D. that gave, probably 
had enough difficulty raising the money. 
It seems that is a problem common to all. 
But it is worth something to accept a chal- 
lenge and meet it. 

And every group had the advantage of 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



83 



feeling that they were doing something 
worth while for some one who needed it very 
much. Anyone who hears about needs in 
other lands would like to do something 
about it. Most everyone would like to go 
and do it personally. The next best thing 
is to have some one else do it and to have 
a part in making it possible for them to do 
it. In fact it is often the case that the 
people who are sent to be missionaries are 
much better qualified to do what needs to 
be done than those who feel like they would 
like to do it. 

So the young people who went abroad in 
1929 — via their dollars — not only gave much 
but received much. Africa and Asia seem 
much closer and more personal to them than 
they would otherwise have been. 

Where in 1930? 

The plan for 1929 seems to have been so 



well received that it is to be continued at 
least another year. 

Briefly stated it is something like this : 
The young people of a church decide they 
will contribute to the work of some mis- 
sionary they know personally or are inter- 
ested in. They decide how much they will 
plan to give during the year. They fill in 
a blank and send it to the General Mission 
Board telling whom they wish to help and 
what their goal is. They plan definitely 
how they will raise the money, making cer- 
tain that their plans are definite enough to 
help them to keep from becoming careless. 
They send their money quarterly or at regu- 
larly stated times to the General Mission 
Board. If they have any questions they 
write to the same Board. 

Leaflets explaining the project are avail- 
able for each member of your young people's 
group. Send your order soon. 



■ I .. I .. I .. I .. I .. I „ I „ I „ I „ I „ I „ I „ I „ I „ I .. I .. H --H M -I " l "H" I- ^ 



Date 



YOUNG PEOPLE GO ABROAD 
B. Y. P. D. Missionary Project, 1930 



; • Congregation District 

'. I Name of Leader 

v Address 

Missionary Chosen 

Number of young people participating Goal set 

j* Send leaflets, "Young People Go Abroad," explaining the project. J 

(Send this report to General Mission Board, Elgin, 111.) 

T- i-H ' i 1 1 1 1 1 - i -. r . i -- i -- i»i-i»i .. i-i-i-i » i"i"i -- i - r - r - M - r - r i -. i» ! » i-.i»r » i»i-i..i.-i » i »i .. i .^»^>f»^H*^-i--i-i"i-i-i"i-4-h-t- 



Junior Missionary Project 
1930 



THE children of the Church of the 
Brethren have a wonderful task dur- 
ing 1930. They are being asked to 
provide the support for the children of mis- 
sionaries. An allowance is made for each 
child on the field. In a few cases the sup- 
port for a particular child is provided by 
some congregation or other church group ; 
however, this plan will not interfere with 
that support. Total amount needed to be 
raised by the juniors is $5,582.50. 

The juniors can be very helpful to the 
mission cause by supplying these funds, but 
more important is their direct and intimate 



contact with the missionaries' children and 
the fields in which our mission stations are 
located. This will give them a broader 
vision of the missionary task and, we believe, 
a sympathetic feeling towards missions. 
Through this contact we hope they will not 
only become more interested in the mis- 
sionary program of the church, but feel they 
have a vital part in it. Missionary materials 
such as stories, pictures, and program sug- 
gestions, will be provided to acquaint the 
children with the people of the world and 
to develop altruistic attitudes and missionary 
habits of giving. 



84 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



We must depend on you as leaders to 
interest the children in the project and 
present the missionary materials. Enclosed 
is a copy of the letter prepared for each 
junior and primary in your Sunday-school. 
On the enclosed order blank state the num- 
ber you will need for your group. 

The Junior League and the Missionary 
Project 

This year the Junior League programs are 
built around the theme, Mexicans in the 
United States, based on a study of the book, 
" Jumping Beans." In cooperation with Miss 
Shriver, Director of Children's Work, it was 
decided to ask leaders of children to present 
the missionary project through the Sunday- 
school. Suggested worship programs will be 
provided as explained under a. below. 
Where the boys and girls meet with the 
adults for the worship service we suggest 
that teachers of primaries and juniors direct 
their pupils in the project and bring them 
missionary information occasionally. Some 
healthy competition between classes may 
help create interest. 

The Plan Is Threefold 
1. Educational 

During the year missionary information, 
stories, and program suggestions, will be 
provided for the leaders. 

a. Suggested worship programs for use in 
the Junior Department of the Sunday-school 
will be published monthly in the Missionary 
Visitor, beginning February issue. (If you 
do not have a Junior Department we sug- 
gest that the adult superintendent or teach- 



ers of primaries and juniors present the 
project.) 

b. Stories from our missionaries, and pic- 
tures of the children of missionaries, will 
appear each month in the Missionary Visitor, 
Junior Department, beginning March issue. 
Urge the parents to provide the Visitor for 
their children. 

c. From time to time letters and stories 
will be sent to each junior working on the 
project. Be sure to report the number work- 
ing in your group so that these will reach 
you promptly. 

2. Expression Through Programs 

Allow the children to give some programs 
to the church. It will increase their interest 
in missionary work, and the adults often 
receive their most lasting impressions from 
children. The General Mission Board office 
desires to help you with program materials. 
Also, your suggestions and helpful material 
to pass on to other leaders, will be ap- 
preciated. 

3. Expression Through Stewardship of 
Money 

Of course mission money is needed, and 
it is important that the children raise as 
much as possible, but money raising should 
be secondary to developing missionary habits 
of giving. If the children are to be ex- 
pected to carry on the mission program of 
the church in a few years, they need to 
be interested in the missionary program now 
and taught right habits of giving. 
Interest the Parents 

Special attention should be given to in- 






Report of Children WorKing' on the 
1930 Missionary Project 



Date 



Name of Leader 
Address 



Number of children participating 

Congregation District 

Sunday-school (if name is not the same as the Congregation) 

Send letters for Juniors explaining the 1930 Project. 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



85 



forming the parents just what the project 
is all about. If the cooperation of the par- 
ents can be enlisted they will be of great 
help in encouraging the children in their 
work. 

Crediting the Money 
You may have personal acquaintance with 
some child and it is all right to talk of 
that child when presenting the project to 
the children, but the money should be re- 
ceived by the General Mission Board, Elgin, 
111., and will all be credited to the general 
fund, the 1930 Junior Fund, rather than to 
any certain individual. You can see the 



difficulties which would be involved in 
crediting gifts to the support of a certain 
child. 

Importance of Registering with the 
Mission Office 
In order to keep you, as leaders, informed 
on the work the children are doing and to 
provide you with missionary materials, we 
need the information requested on the blank 
below. Will you please fill out the blank 
in full and send to Mission Board Office 
as early as possible. This will not obligate 
you in any way in case it is impossible to 
carry through the project as you plan. 



CHILDREN OF MISSIONARIES 

CHILDREN UNDER SIXTEEN YEARS OF AGE 
India 

Name Address Age Parents 

Alley, Lawrence A., Palghar, Thana Dist 13 Howard L. and Hattie 

Alley, Ralph D., Palghar, Thana Dist 11 Howard L. and Hattie 

Alley, Erma F., Palghar, Thana Dist 7 Howard L. and Hattie 

Alley, Raymond L., Palghar, Thana Dist 5 Howard L. and Hattie 

Alley, Thelma Kathleen, Palghar, Thana Dist 3 Howard L. and Hattie 

Blickenstaff, David E., Bulsar, Surat Dist 14 Lynn A. and Mary 

Blickenstaff, Stephen Claire, Bulsar, Surat Dist 5 Lynn A. and Mary 

Brooks, Betty Jeane, Vyara, via Surat 4 Harlan J. and Ruth 

Ebey, Leah Ruth, Vada, Thana Dist 15 Adam and Alice 

Fox, Dallas J. Winfield, Bulsar, Surat Dist 13 Dr. J. W. and Besse 

Garner, Jasper H. B., Ahwa, Dangs, Surat Dist 8 H. P. and Kathryn 

Garner, Warren Kenneth, Ahwa, Dangs, Surat Dist 3 H. P. and Kathryn 

Kaylor, Roy Delbert, Vada, Thana Dist 5 John I. and Ina 

(now— 1515-2nd St., Bakersfield, Calif.) 

Kaylor, Myrtle Eilene, Vada, Thana Dist 2 John I. and Ina 

(now— 15l5-2nd St., Bakersfield, Calif.) 

Long, Magdelene, Anklesvar, Broach Dist 13 I. S. and Effie 

(now— Bridgewater, Va.) 

Long, Elizabeth, Anklesvar, Broach Dist 5 I. S. and Effie 

(now — Bridgewater, Va.) 

Miller, Josephine, Post Umalla, Via Anklesvar 10 A. S. B. and Jennie 

Miller, Marjorie, Post Umalla, Via Anglesvar 8 A. S. B. and Jennie 

Miller, Maurice, Post Umalla, Via Anklesvar 4 A. S. B. and Jennie 

Moomaw, David R., Anklesvar, Broach Dist 5 Ira W. and Mabel 

Moomaw, Richard Wilbur, Anklesvar, Broach Dist 3 Ira W. and Mabel 

Mow, Lois A., Bujor Bag, Lunsikui, Navsari 5 Baxter M. and Anna 

Mow, Joseph Baxter, Bujor Bag, Lunsikui, Navsari 3 Baxter M. and Anna 

Shull, Lorita, Vada, Thana Dist 7 Chalmer G. and Mary 

Shull, Gordon, Vada, Thana Dist 4 Chalmer G. and Mary 

Wagoner, Elizabeth Evelyn, Vyara, via Surat Dist 17 J. E. and Ellen 

Wagoner, Emma Josephine, Vyara, via Surat Dist 15 J. E. and Ellen 

China 

Bright, John C, Ping Ting Chow, Shansi 14 J. Homer and Minnie 

Crumpacker, Haven, Ping Ting Chow, Shansi 7 Frank H. and Anna 

Flory, Wendel, Ping Ting Chow, Shansi 9 Byron M. and Nora 

Heisey, Lowell V., Show Yang, Shansi 14 Walter J. and Sue 

Heisey, Wilbur L., Show Yang, Shansi 8 Walter J. and Sue 

Heisey, Frances Louise, Show Yang, Shansi 2 Walter J. and Sue 

Ikenberry, Ernest Alva, Tai Yuan Fu, % Y. M. C. A., Shansi 5 Ernest and Olivia 

Ikenberry, Olivia Susan, Tai Yuan Fu, % Y. M. C. A., Shansi 3 Ernest and Olivia 

Ikenberry, Elizabeth Ann, Tai Yuan Fu, % Y. M. C. A., Shansi 1 Ernest and Olivia 

Myers, Wallington Zigler, Tai Yuan Fu, % Y. M. C. A., Shansi .... 9 Minor M. and Sara 

Myers, Donald Stover, Tai Yuan Fu, % Y. M. C. A., Shansi 5 Minor M. and Sara 

Myers, Doris Ruth, Tai Yuan Fu, % Y. M. C. A., Shansi 2 Minor M. and Sara 

Oberholtzer, Henry K., Liao Chow, Shansi 12 I. E. and Elizabeth 

Oberholtzer, Emma M., Liao Chow, Shansi 10 I. E. and Elizabeth 

Oberholtzer, Catherine, Liao Chow, Shansi 10 I. E. and Elizabeth 

Smith, Pauline E., Show Yang, Shansi 10 W. Harlan and Frances 

Smith, Helen I., Show Yang, Shansi 7 W. Harlan and Frances 

Smith, Dorothy, Show Yang, Shansi 5 W. Harlan and Frances 

Smith, Wm. Dwight, Show Yang, Shansi 1 W. Harlan and Frances 

Wampler, Sara Anna, Liao Chow, Shansi 12 Ernest M. and Elizabeth 



86 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



Sweden ' 

Graybill, Ruth Hildegard, Spangatan 38, Malmo 9 J. F. and Alice 

Norris, Donald Carl, Spangatan 38, Malmo 2 Glen E. and Lois 

West Africa 

Burke, Royce, adopted, 6317 Grand Avenue, Chicago 7 mos. Dr. Homer and Marguerite 

Gibbel, Frances Kathleen, Garkida, Nigeria, via Jos 2 Dr. J. Paul and Verda 

(now — Girard, 111.) 
Helser, Esther Mae, Garkida, Nigeria, via Jos 4 Albert and Lola 

(now — Thornville, Ohio) 
Robertson, Jane Vena, Garkida, Nigeria, via Jos 1 Dr. Russell and Bertha 

(now — Thornville, Ohio) 
Kulp, Philip Masterton, Lassa, Nigeria, via Maiduguria 3 months H. Stover and Christiana 

Suggested Programs for Women's Missionary Societies 

BASED ON THE TEXT, "FROM JERUSALEM TO JERUSALEM" 

Beginning at Jerusalem, Chapter 1 with a short discussion of women's work 

"We cannot believe in Christ ourselves without in the early church. 

believing in him for the world" Hymn: "We've a Story to Tell to the Na- 

Devotions tions » 

Hymn : « Faith of Our Fathers " Sentence prayers> concluding with firgt 

Scripture: The Missionary Commands of er j94 
Jesus as found in the four Gospels and 

The Acts, pp. 19-21, given by five Expansion to the East and South, Chapter 2 

women. " Christ hath sent us into all the world that 

Prayer : For a missionary spirit in our- . men ma y find in him eternal lif e " 

selves; for our church and its missionary evotions 

program. Hymn: "In Christ There Is No East or 

Chapter Outline West" 

1. God's Plan of Salvation, pp. 13-23. Scripture : "The Wise Men from the East" 
Speak briefly of (a) The Plan, page 13, Matt. 2: 1-12. 

also page 15 beginning "We are to see p ray er: For the growing churches of the 

the Plan," (b) Nature of the Plan, (c) Orient and Africa. 

The Plan revealed in the Old and New ~, ~ Al . 

T Chapter Outline 

. __ ' _, •„, (Two methods of presentation are sug- 

2. Map Study: The Spread of the Faith. gested If the second h chosen pUms should 

The discussion will be more real if a be made weeks in advance> Make it a big 

world map is used. Maps may be ob- public meeting of the year and invite the 

tained from Travel Bureaus or our Gen- community) 

eral Mission Board. See quotation from ,,-..■.._. Tx . . » . 

• Harnack, pp. 23. Characterize the 1- Chnst.an.ty s F.rst Home m the Orient, 

churches. 

3. Story of the Conversion of Constantine, Z M a rIy stu l iSSi ° nary Gr ° Wth * PP ' ^'^ 
pp. 31, 32. If possible get a portrait of ap s u y. 

Constantine. 3. Legend of Abgarus, pp. 53-54. This 

4. Reasons for the Spread of Christianity. shows . ^e interest of the rulers of the 
An Exercise. Have written on a chart time in rell g lon - 

the five reasons as found on pp. 32-35 4 - The Stor y of the Armenian Church, pp. 

and let the women read in unison. Or, 55-58. 

let five women present in turn five plac- 5. The Nestorian Church and Its Two Mis- 

ards on which are printed the five rea- sions in India and China, pp. 59-63. 

sons. Announce, "These are the five 6. Roman Catholic Missionaries Go to 

reasons for the rapid spread of Chris- China, pp. 67-73. 

tianity." Each in turn holds up her Discussion : Is the Christian Church of today 

placard. Then have the audience read guilty of any of the things that caused the 

the five reasons in unison. downfall of the Nestorian and early Roman 

5. Character of Apostolic Preaching. Men- missions? 

tion the five characteristics pp. 35-42, Hymn : " Fling Out the Banner " 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



87 



A Demonstration; a Journey 

(In announcing the program suggest that 
each one read the book of Acts, at least 
chapter 9.) 

Rooms in the church should be arranged 
to represent the countries to be visited. 
Readers, in costume (long cheese-cloth robes 
arranged so as to give a dignified appear- 
ance to the Reader) should read from a 
typewritten copy the message of the country 
she represents. 
Room I 

(a) In one corner of the room place a 
cradle or manger. Mary, as Madonna. 
A Star. Wise men come with their 
gifts. 

Reader. First paragraph, page 47. 

(b) In another corner of Room I, a Korean 
scene as described at bottom page 47. 
Make a mill with cardboard. The bed 
may be made with a comforter, folded 
lengthwise, rolled, tied with a string, 
and a block of wood for a pillow. 
Make a shrine. Prayers should be 
written on paper and tacked on the 
wall. People walking by stop and 
read the prayers. Costumes are de- 
scribed page 48. Have a witch doctor. 

Reader : Page 47, second paragraph. 

Room II 

(a) In one part of room, three young men 
represent Paul, John, and Peter. They 
carry scrolls. 

Reader. Page 49, paragraph beginning 
" As Palestine is the stragetic." 

(b) In another part of Room II, spades 
and earth. 

Reader : " I will read you a letter found 
in Pliny's letter to the Emperor Trajan, 
when he was governor of Bithynia and 
Pontus, written A. D. 112 or 114." Read 
from scroll part of letter pp. 50-51. 

Two other readers give the legend and the 
answer of Jesus, page 53. 

Room III 
An Armenian scene. Get Near East post- 
ers if possible, also Armenian lace. 
Reader. Page 54, " Here the Bible was 
translated," etc., to line 3, page 55. 
Short sketch of Gregory and the Ar- 
menian church, and the Remnant, to 
middle page 59. 



Room IV 
Use a Chinese setting — flags, scrolls, and 

Chinese costumes. Make a tablet, page 

64, and write a few sentences from the 

translation. 
Reader. Story of the Nestorians, page 59. 

On the map trace the expansion to 

India and China. 

WORLD DAY OF PRAYER 
March 7 

"And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, 
will draw all men unto me." 

You are earnestly invited to join with 
Christians of all lands in a World Fellowship 
of prayer on March 7. Attend the service 
in your community on that day; also unite 
with others in daily prayer with one accord 
during anniversary of Pentecost. 

Last year Christians of thirty-two coun- 
tries observed the World Day of Prayer. 
One leader in the Orient, who recognized 
that the women with whom she was work- 
ing knew very little about the women of 
other lands, prepared a pageant in which 
the different nations appeared in costume. 
This helped the women visualize the women 
and nations for whom they were praying. 
One African woman who had forgotten for 
what she was to pray, said, " Lord, I have 
forgotten what I am to pray for but you 
have the letter before you and will know." 
A woman of Persia said, " How wonderful 
to think that just before our meeting the 
people in China have been in prayer, and 
in a few hours women in America will be 
praying for us." 

Because of the 1900th anniversary of 
Pentecost and of the birth of the church, 
1930 is a year of unusual significance and 
opportunity. 

A Call to Prayer 

The following subjects for prayer, which were out- 
lined for us by a young woman of the Philippines, 
may well claim our waking moments each new day: 
SUNDAY. That all those in the Church of Christ 

may, in preparation for the World Day of Prayer, 

March 7, 1930, give themselves earnestly to the 

ministry of intercession. 
MONDAY. That we may be filled with the spirit 

of the Master, and may manifest the devotion and 

sacrifice of the early disciples, among them, women, 

who followed him. 
TUESDAY. That the Light of God's Word may 

dawn upon the minds and guide the lives of all 

earnest seekers after righteousness. 
WEDNESDAY. That there be an awakening among 

Christians to their opportunity to witness for 

Christ, and that those who have not yet come to 



88 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



know the Lord may find him through a vital 
Christian experience. 

THURSDAY. That the Youth of the World may 
consecrate all their powers to the building of God's 
Kingdom and may with rejoicing testify to him 
and his power through their lives and message. 

FRIDAY. That the spirit of love may rule in the 
affairs of men, and that through a better under- 
standing all races may be drawn into a universal 
brotherhood. 

SATURDAY. That in 1930, on this 1900th anniver- 
sary of Pentecost, the Christian Church in all lands 
may experience anew the power of the Holy Spirit, 
and that Jesus may again be lifted up through a 
revival of the simple daily witnessing of his fol- 
lowers. 



MISSIONARY ENVELOPES AND BANKS 

A certain Junior Department has a novel 
plan for taking the missionary offering. 
Each chifd is given a small envelope, on 
the face of which is pasted an appropriate 
picture. These are taken from old mission- 
ary magazines, special-day folders, and 
other literature. A missionary text is writ- 
ten opposite the picture, and underneath: 
" This is to hold your missionary offering 
next Sunday." 

(Continued on Next Page) 




JUST LIKE YOU STORIES 
By Lucy W. Peabody 

These little books of stories are for chil- 
dren 3 to 7 years of age. Mothers will use 
them for good-night stories, teachers in 
primary or kindergarten classes will find 
them right for Sunday-school. Junior lead- 
ers may have them for the younger group. 
They may be used as birthday and Christ- 
mas presents for the little folks everywhere. 
They teach world friendship. 

Book I JUST LIKE YOU (all varieties), 
in rose color covers 

Book II TARO AND UME, Japanese chil- 
dren, in blue covers 



Book III DAVID AND SUSI, in Africa, 

black and white covers 
Book IV LITTLE LORD JESUS, in bright 

red Christmas covers 
Book V PEDRO AND THE BELLS, Phil- 
ippine Island children, in green 
and gold covers 
Book VI PRAYERS FOR LITTLE CHIL- 
DREN, in blue, rose and gold 
Sold separately or in a set in a lovely box. 
Each story book has 60 pages, strong leath- 
erette covers, many pictures and stories that 
children love. Price per copy, 25 cents, price 
for six in decorated box, postpaid, $1.50. 
Order from M. H. Leavis, P. O. Box 4, North 
Cambridge, Mass. 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



89 



MISSIONARY ENVELOPES AND BANKS 

(Continued from Page 88) 

In another Junior Department each child 
was given a home made bank, in which to 
place his share of earnings or allowances 
for missions. With an empty box (a baking 
powder can is appropriate), some lacquer or 
enamel, a brush, and something to make a 
slit through which the coins are dropped, 
a bank may be made in a few minutes. 
These little banks were constant reminders 
to the boys and girls to share with their 
brothers and sisters across the seas. 
AFRICAN CURIOS APPRECIATED 

The five packets of African curios, re- 
ceived last summer from our missionaries in 
Africa, have been kept busy among the 
Junior League groups since August. The 
finest expressions of appreciation have been 
received. 

Among the many interesting meetings 
held in connection with the exhibition of 
the curios was the special missionary pro- 
gram given by the juniors of the Brick 
Church, Southern Indiana. The program 
was given at the Sunday-school hour before 
the whole school. Both old and young were 
interested in the curios. At the close of 
the program each child who had taken a 
mite box came forward with his box and 
told how he had earned his money for 
missions. Some children tithed their allow- 
ances ; others ran errands, trapped, and 
raised chickens, ducks, and potatoes. Total 
amount contributed, $20.30. 

A packet of the curios, with suggested 
program material, will be sent to any church 
upon request. Write the General Mission 
Board, Elgin, Illinois. 

NEWS FROM THE FIELDS 

(Continued from Page 81) 
the wondrous event. It was a long time 
before things were quiet in the school court 
after the gifts were presented on Christmas 
eve. At three o'clock in the morning, in 
spite of the cold weather, all were up and out 
again, singing Christmas carols under our 
windows. The sound of Christmas voices on 
the midnight air always prompts a renewal 
of one's vow of consecration to him who was 
born, lived among men, died and rose again 
that we might have life and have it more 
abundantly. 

Children Race to 

Deliver New Year's Greetings 

This is New Year's Day, and while we are 
writing these lines, the school girls have 



come in a body, according to their custom, 
to deliver their " Happy New Year !" And 
see! The boys follow in quick succession, 
but the girls beat them this time. 

Shall Mission Schools 
Be Discontinued? 

With much regret we are compelled to 
announce either the closing of our mission 
schools in the very near future or the con- 
tinuance of them under state control, which 
will mean a complete reorganization of the 
schools, placing Chinese men and women at 
the head, with perhaps missionary advisors. 
Which shall it be? This is the question 
which must be decided in the immediate 
future. To continue on the present basis 
would be doing it in direct opposition to the 
new government, which would make Chris- 
tianity very unpopular in China, and lessen 
our possibilities as well as our opportunities, 
for teaching the Word. 



MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Conference Offering, 1929. As of January 31, 1930, 
the Conference (budget) offering for the year end- 
ing February 28, 1930, stands as follows: 

Cash received since March 1, 1929 $249,591.08 

(The 1929 budget of $363,000.00 is 69% raised, where- 
as it should be 91.6%.) 

Mission Board Treasury Statement. The following 
shows the condition of mission finances on January 
31, 1930: 

Income since March 1, 1929 $299,846.49 

Income same period last year 249,129.11 

Expense since March 1, 1929 243,090.74 

Expense same period last year 259,087.08 

Mission deficit January 31, 1930 43,615.72 

Mission deficit December 31, 1929 67,527.82 

Decrease in deficit for January, 1930 23,912.10 

January Receipts. Contributions were received dur- 
ing January by funds as follows: 

Total Rec'd 
Receipts since 3-1-29 

World-Wide Missions $19,637.55 $68,765.33 

Student Fellowship Fund 1928-1929 402.91 2,979.10 

Aid Societies' Mission Fund— 1927 612.00 3,733.86 

Home Missions 902.86 12,458.80 

Greene County, Virginia, Mission 57.50 335.77 

Foreign Missions 610.62 4,684.16 

Junior League— 1928 69.98 589.47 

Junior League— 1929 1,819.23 4,672.73 

Junior League— 1930 46.30 46.30 

B. Y. P. D.— 1929 445.55 2,272.50 

Women's Deficit Fund 2,292.97 4,775.33 

India Mission 528.15 2,194.58 

India Native Worker 175.00 490.25 

India Boarding School 145.75 1,143.97 

India Share Plan 553.75 4,196.46 

Anklesvar Churchhouse 7.92 61.92 

India Hospitals 5.00 57.00 

India Missionary Supports 4,383.75 22,213.89 

Vyara Church Building Fund ... 5.00 3,939.89 

Ahwa Church Building Fund .... 10.00 60.62 

China Mission 691.00 2,332.51 

China Native Worker 12.68 244.93 

China Boys' School 5.00 90.52 

China Share Plan 189.53 1,646.53 

China Missionary Supports 1,796.42 10,863.04 

Africa Missionary Supports 1,477.46 7,350.31 

Africa Mission 1,430.42 5,799.38 

Africa Share Plan 198.67 1,613.11 

Near East Relief 50.00 561.39 

Sweden Relief 10.00 10.00 

Flood Relief 46.35 92.00 

China Famine Relief 500.00 1,265.33 

Conference Budget Donations .... 1,217.52 75,400.56 

Conference Budget Designated .. 37.36 385.68 



90 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



Junior Missionaries 
at Home 




Junior Missionaries 
\ Over There 



The Child of Two Nations 

The Missionary Child 

Because I am a child, I enter homes where my parents could not go, and open the way 

for them. 
Because I am a native of their land, speak their tongue naturally, I find an easier path 

to their hearts. 
Because my home is a home where there is the patter of little feet, it is loved the more 

by the foreigner. 
Because another land is my land, its people my people, I am not a stranger among the 

natives. 
Because of my youth, my lips can tell the Old, Old Story, and sing His praises without 

offense. 

Because of my education in two tongues, I will mean more to the mission field than my 
parents, later. 

Because I come back to you through the school years, I seal friendships between nations. 
Because I come to you orphaned at an early age, homeless, you must be to me a father. 
Because I am a loan to you — child of your missionary — you must guard well the years 

spent there. 
Because my life is an investment of God's time, God's money, and God's workman — 

Build well the America to which I come, 
Bind close the tie between my countries, 
Guard well the school to which you send me, 
Be true to the parents who give me up. 

— Mrs. Rosalee Mills Appleby. 





Betty Jeanne Brooks 



Ei ma, Raymond, and Thelma Alley 



March 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



91 



Leah Ruth Ebey 

Fifteen years old. Born 
at Anklesvar, India. 
Junior in the high 
school at Woodstock, 
Landour, Mussorie, U. 
P., India. She likes 
imaginative games, is 
fond of reading, likes 
to write verses, and 
loves hiking and camp- 
ing. She has a room- 
mate, an English girl 
three years older than 
she is, of whom she is 
very fond, and a girl 
whose father is a 
Swedish missionary is 
another particular 
friend. She is happy in 
the boarding school. It 
was hard for her to 
leave her friends in 
America, and she keeps up a regular correspondence 
with eight or ten of her school-mates. She is very 
fond of ice cream and candies. She weighs 100 
pounds, is about five feet tall, has dark brown hair 
and eyes. 

This snap-shot was taken just as she was starting 
down the long, steep hill to school from Prospect 
Point one day last May while her mother was with 
her. - . | ^J 




Starting to School 




Lawrence and Ralph Alley, 
with their father 



4 . - HHHHHH H-**-HHH-*4 H-*4^^ 



Winners of the Missionary Picture Story Contest 

Come over to the Mission Rooms and take a peep at the pile of stories that 
have been received! There are long ones and short ones, neat ones and good ones, 
and a very few that could hardly be included in any of these classes. This we can 
say for all of them — they are very interesting and we wish you could have a chance 
to read them all. You will have opportunity to read six of them at least because 
the best six will be printed — three in this department of the Missionary Visitor, 
April issue, and three in Our Boys and Girls, April 6. 

Can you guess how many stories were written? More than a hundred, or 
even two hundred. T-w-o h-u-n-d-r-e-d t-w-e-n-t-y! That is fine. To each one 
writing a story there will be sent a coin from India and some foreign stamps. Each 
of the winners will also receive a game, " Across Africa with Livingstone." 

Following are the names of the six writing the best stories: 

Virginia Stoner, 10 years, New Lebanon, Ohio. 

Barbara Anna Roller, 12 years, New Market, Va. 

Frances K. Deardorff, 1 3 years, Lanark, 111. 

Vernon Gearhart, 1 2 years, McVeytown, Pa. 

Ira Meyers, 1 1 years, Lindsay, Calif. 

Dortha Marie Boyer, 9 years, North Manchester, Ind. 



4..|„l»|M^lM I „|„|„ I „ H -fr.W' H" MH^**a„H^ + 



92 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



Missionary Worship Program for Juniors 

To Be Used in Presenting Junior Missionary Project 

EDITH BARNES* 



Call to Worship (by leader) : 

"O Father, you have given me 
So much of love and joy today 
That I am thinking joy and love 
To other children far away." 
Leader: "Jehovah reigneth ; let the earth 
rejoice. Say among the nations the Lord 
reigneth." 
Children : " Declare his glory among the 

nations." 
Hymn : " From Greenland's Icy Mountains " 

(first stanza). 
Hymn : " In Christ There Is No East or 
West." 

(Notice the advance in thought of world 
brotherhood in Reginald Heber's hymn 
written more than a hundred years ago 
and John Oxenham's written not much 
longer than twenty years ago. Perhaps 
we are nearer our brothers across the 
sea than we have ever been.) 



Scripture: Isaiah 32: 16-18; Nahum 1: 15. 
Story: "What a Little Girl Can Do." 
Call to Prayer : " Let all the earth keep 

silence before him." 
Prayer (silent, followed by audible sentences 

by boys and girls if they are accustomed 

to praying aloud, followed by short prayer 

by leader.) 

Offering Service. 
Leader : " Of all that thou shalt give me 
I will surely give the tenth unto thee." 
Offering received by two juniors. 
Prayer-Hymn (sung by all, softly) : 

" Take these gifts and let them be 
Consecrated, Lord, to thee; 
Helping children everywhere 
Feel and know thy loving care."* 
Tune: "Take My Life and Let It Be" 



Superintendent Junior Department, Elgin Sunday-school. 



What a Little Girl Can Do 



EFFIE V. LONG* 



IN a village in India lived a little girl 
who was so untidy — in fact her mother 
was, and most of the folks of that 
village were too! It was a dirty place. Our 
little girl seldom combed her hair, and she 
didn't bathe very often because she didn't 
want to — didn't know any better. And what 
little clothing she wore was so dirty ! , The 
whole place seemed God-forsaken and self- 
satisfied. 

The little girl's name was Prem. That 
means love. Wouldn't you like to have a 
name like that? But, poor girl, she scarce- 
ly knew what love meant. 

Her mother was afraid of the gods, so 
she would sometimes go out and bow down 
to a red stone under a tree near by. All 
the village folk called this their God. The 
boys and girls would be taken there too, 
for fear something would happen to them. 
They rather liked to go for they usually 
got a small piece of the cocoanut broken 
over the idol. 

* Missionary to India, now on furlough in America. 



So life went on, day by day, in the same 
way, till one day a wonderful thing hap- 
pened! A white man came to the village. 
All gathered around to see him and to learn 
what he had to say. He chatted pleasantly 
with them, and showed them pictures, and 
later suggested opening a school for the 
boys and girls of that dirty little village. 
After much talking and planning, the school 
was opened — but only one little girl sat in 
school with the boys the first day. She 
kept coming every day, and kept right at 
the head of the class. She saw the mis- 
sionary lady often and wished she could 
be just like her. 

Prem finished work in her little village 
school and then said, " May I please go 
with you to the Mission Boarding School?" 
Of course she could! There she was just 
as nice and clean as any of the other girls, 
and she combed and oiled her black hair till 
it shone. She would often wear a fragrant 
white jasmine flower in her hair roll. With 
a clean skirt and jacket, her only clothing, 



March 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



93 



and with a bath often, she looked as neat 
and clean as any little girl could look. 

And how hard she worked at her lessons ! 
When she had finished her Boarding School, 
she still was not satisfied. She wanted to 
go to college. She said, " If boys can go 
to college, so can girls." This pleased the 
Missionary lady. She wanted her to go, but 
there was no college for girls- near them, 
so the missionary had to take her work 
along and sit with Prem day by day, as 
she was the only girl in a college for 
men, and folks thought it not proper for 
her to go. Don't you feel glad that she 
had the courage to go? 

Prem was a Christian now, and during 
vacation she had helped the Lady Doctor 
Missionary to care for the many sick folks 
who crowded up to the Hospital doors. 
" How like Jesus her work is," she thought. 
" If only I could be a Doctor too, I'd help 
all these poor, sick people day and night!" 
But where was the money to come from? 
She was a poor girl without a cent ! She 
kept thinking of this, however, as she went 
back for her last year of college work. 
She worked so hard now that she got a 
scholarship, that is money to go to school 
some more. So she said to the Lady Doctor, 
" Do you think I could work like Jesus did, 
and cure the lame, the diseased and the 
blind? I would rather do that for my own 
people than anything else in the world ! 
Then I could tell them about Jesus and 
they would understand at once. Oh, if only 



I could go back to my own dirty village, 
and tell them about Jesus' love, and help 
them to clean up inside as well as outside, 
why, Doctor dear, I'd be the happiest girl 
in the world!" 

" That would be the finest work for you, 
my dear, and this money will help you go 
on. I'll help you arrange and get started, 
and I'm sure the Lord will help you succeed 
in this noble work. You will come back to 
us a real doctor, ready to help your people." 

And she did ! After four years of hard 
work in London, our Prem was graduated 
with honors. She was ready to go back to 
her people. They had never seen an auto- 
mobile, no, not even a train, nor knives, 
forks or spoons, nor pretty pictures on the 
walls and carpets on the floors. Prem had 
become accustomed to such things, but she 
was going back to her dirty people in that 
dirty little village ! And she was not puffed 
up by knowing so much ! No indeed, she 
sat on the floor among the very poorest 
and unlovely ones, in the dirtiest huts, and 
cared for their ills. How the light of Jesus 
shone in her face! They all loved her! 

But she could not stay there. Why? She 
was such a good Doctor and so kind and 
honest, that she was sought after. They 
called her to take charge of the Lady Duf- 
ferne Hospital, a place of great honor and 
responsibility. 

So she is there, doing the work Jesus 
did, and people flock to her. Her good 
work is still going on. 

(Continued on Next fage) 




JUNIOR LEAGUERS, Thornville, Ohio 



94 



The Missionary Visitor 



March 
1930 



Juniors and Our African Brothers 



Idaho Junior Leaguers 

Fifty boys and girls of Nampa, Idaho, 
were busy last year working for our African 
Brothers. A letter from the Junior League 
leader. Mrs. F. J. DeCoursey, tells how they 
raised their money. 

" Some of the children raised chickens, 
pigs, potatoes, corn, and some did piece 
work. The largest amount received from 
one child was $5.00 from chickens. One 
Sunday-school class of seventeen boys were 
given dimes to be invested. The returns 
from these were $16.65 which was put in 
our fund. The largest increase from a dime 
was $4.90. Two offerings from older folks 
were added to our fund also, making it a 
total of $78.00. We hope to do even better 
this year. May the groups of boys and 
girls all over our land set an example in 
mission work that will not let the older 
folks fall down on their job." 

J* 

A Live Junior League 

The Junior League of Laton Church, Calif., 
sent $57.10 for the 1929 project, Our African 
Brothers. Last year they raised $44.00, so 
they set their goal for $50.00 this year, 
thinking they could reach that with a little 
more effort. They use a small cedar chest 
for their offerings each year, and they are 
always wishing that some year they can 
have it full to the brim. Mrs. Verna DeHart 
is the junior leader. 

The children sold calendars, raised chick- 
ens, picked and cut fruit, helped mother in 
special ways, and various other things. 

Junior Church League, Dayton, Va. 

This Junior League has an enrollment of 
twenty-five boys and girls. It includes chil- 
dren from the Primary and Junior Depart- 
ments of the Sunday-school, ranging in ages 
from seven to twelve years. 

Their work during the year showed the 
splendid cooperation of the group. A study 
of Africa was made through stories, pictures 
and maps. Various programs were given. 
Scrap-books were made and sent to the 
black children of Africa as Christmas gifts. 



Each child made a mite box (which repre- 
sented an African hut) in which to deposit 
his earnings for Our Black Brothers Project. 
A dime was given by the leader to each 
child. This was increased during the sum- 
mer by earnings which included raising 
chickens, ducks and lambs, picking bean 
beetles, selling berries and vegetables, and 
helping mother. 

At the end of the year the mite boxes 
were brought in and opened. All were 
happy to find that the earnings had increased 
to the amount of $27.15, which was sent 
in as their share in the work for the 
African Brothers. 



£ 



Philadelphia Juniors' Self-Denial Offering 

The juniors of the First Church, Philadel- 
phia, are busy at work for their African 
Brothers. They are greatly interested, which 
is evidenced by their giving. They started 
a self-denial offering. Each Sunday this 
offering was put in a little bank which is 
made in the likeness of a little African boy. 
At Easter time they sold chocolate eggs. 
In this way they have raised their share 
for the African project. 

We have an interesting group of boys and 
girls. They know the books of the Bible 
very well. Each boy and girl is given the 
name of a Bible book and as the books 
are called they arise. They are always 
anxious for this roll call. Sometimes we 
choose sides and the Superintendent calls 
out a book. 

Mrs. Fred Wetter, Superintendent. 

(These juniors raised $25.00 for Our African Broth- 
ers. They also sent $10.00 to a local orphanage, and 
$7.50 for the general missionary deficit.) 



WHAT A LITTLE GIRL CAN DO 

(Continued from Page 93) 

Children, don't you admire her? Don't 
you love her? This is a really, true story, 
for I traveled with her on the boat for days 
on the great ocean, and she is still the 
sweet, humble follower of Jesus, almost too 
modest to tell us about her work. 



Church of the Brethren Missionaries 

Supported in Whole or in Part by Funds Administered by the General Mission Board 
With the Year They Entered Service 



AMERICA 

Church of the Brethren In- 
dustrial School, Geer, Vs. 

Bollinger, Amsey, and Flor- 
ence, 1922 

Finckh, Elsie, 1925 

Hersch, Orville, and Mabel, 
1925 

Kline, Alvin and Edna, 1919 

Knight, Henry, March, Va. 
1928 

Wampler, Nelie, 1922 
In Pastoral Service 

Bowman, Price, and Elsie, 
Bassett, Va., 1925 

Eby, E. H., and Emma, 2923 
St. Joseph Ave., St. Jo- 
seph, Mo., 1927 

Weiss, Lorell, 1188 Missouri 
Ave., Portland, Ore., 1927 

Haney, R. A., and Irva, 
Lonaconing, Md., 1925 

Rohrer, Ferdie, and Pearl 
Jefferson, N. C, 1927 

Ziegler, Edward, and Ilda, 
405 E. Eleventh Ave., John- 
son City, Tenn., 1923 

Barr, Francis and Cora, Al- 
bany, Ore., 1928 
In Evangelistic Service 

Smith, Rev., and Mrs. S. Z., 
Sidney, Ohio 



SWEDEN 

Graybill, J. F, and Alice, 

Bergsgatan 45, M a 1 m 6, 

Sweden, 1911 
Norris, Glen M., and Lois, 

Spangatan 3 8, M a 1 m 6, 

Sweden, 1929 

On Furlough 

Buckingham, Ida, Oakley, 
111., 1913 

CHINA 
Liao Chow, Shansi, China 

Hutchison, Anna, 1911 
Oberholtzer, I. E., and 

Elizabeth, 1916 
Senger, Nettie M., 1916 
Shock, Laura J., 1916 
Ulery. Ruth F., 1926 
Wampler, Ernest M., 1918, 

and Elizabeth, 1922 

Ping Ting Chow, Shansi, China 

Bright, J. Homer, and Min- 
nie, 1911 

Crumpacker, F. H., and Anna, 
1908 

Flory, Byron M., and Nora, 
1917 

Flory, Edna R. t 1917 

Horning, Emma, 1908 

Metzger, Minerva, 1910 

Schaeffer, Mary, 1917 

Sollenberger, O. C., and 
Hazel. 1919 



Bulsar, Surat Dist., India 
Blickenstaff, Lynn A., and 

Mary, 1920 
Blough, J. M., and Anna, 

1903 
Cottrell, Dr. A. R., and 

Laura, 1913 
Fox, Dr. J. W., and Besse, 

1929 
Mohler, Jennie, 1916 
Shumaker, Ida C, 1910 

Dahanu Road, Thana Dist., 
India 

Blickenstaff, Verna M., 1919 
Ebbert, Ella, 1917 
Metzger, Dr. Ida, 1925 
Swartz, Goldie E., 1916 

Jalalpor, Surat Dist., India 

Miller, Eliza B., 1900 

Vada, Thana Dist., India 

Brumbaugh, Anna B., 1919 
Ebey, Adam, and Alice, 1900 
Shull, Chalmer, and Mary, 
1919 

Palghar, Thana Dist., India 

Alley, Howard L., and Hat- 
tie, 1917 

Post Umalla, via Anklesvar, 
India 

Miller, Arthur S. B., and 

Jennie, 1919 
Widdowson, Olive, 1912 
Ziegler, Kathryn, 1908 

Vyara, via Surat, India 

Brooks, Harlan J., and Ruth, 
1924 

Wagoner, J. E., and Ellen, 
1919 

Mow, Anetta, 1917 

Burjor Bag, Lunsikui, Nav- 
sari, India 

Mow, Baxter M., and Anna, 
1923 

Woodstock School, Landour 
Mussoorie, U. P., India 
Stoner, Susan L., 1927 
On Furlough 

Butterbaugh, Bertha, 3435 W. 
Van Buren St., Chicago, 
111., 1919 

Nickey, Dr. Barbara M., 
Monticello, Minn., 1915 

Kaylor, John I., 1911, and 
Ina, 1515 Second St., Bak- 
ersfield, Calif., 1921 

Long, I. S., and Effie, Bridge- 
water, Va., 1903 

Roop, Ethel, 1926 

Shickel, Elsie N., 2211 Orange 
Ave. N. W., Roanoke, Va., 
1921 

Wolf, L. Mae, Franklin 
Grove. 111.. 1922 

Woods, Beulah, 1924 

• Otherwise employed in America until conditions permit return to the field. 

Please Notice.— Postage on letters to our missionaries is 5c for each ounce or fraction 
thereof and 3c for each additional ounce or fraction. 



Show Yang, Shansi, China 
Clapper, V. Grace, 1917 
Cripe, Winnie, 1911 
Heisey, Walter J., and Sue, 

1917 
Neher, Minneva J., 1924 
Smith, W. Harlan, and Fran- 
ces, 1919 

Tai Yuan Fu, care of Y. M. 
C. A., Shansi, China 
Ikenberry, E. L., and Olivia. 

1922 
Myers, Minor M., and Sara, 
1919 

On Furlough 

• Brubaker, L. S., and Marie, 
331 S. 3d. Covina. Calif., 1924 

Pollock, Myrtle, 520 E. Kan- 
sas Ave., McPherson, Kans., 
1917 

AFRICA 

Garkida, Nigeria, West Africa, 
via Jos 

Beahm, Wm. M., and Esther, 

1924 
Harper, Clara, 1926 
Heckman, Clarence C, and 

Lucile, 1924 
Robertson. Dr. Russell L., 

and Bertha C. 1927 
Rupel, Paul, and Naomi, 1929 
Schechter, Elnora. 1929 
Shisler, Sara, 1926 

Lassa, via Maiduguri, Nigeria, 
West Africa 

Kulp, H. Stover, 1922, and 
Christina, 1927 

On Furlough 

• Burke, Dr. Homer L., and 
Marguerite, 6317 Grand 
Ave., Chicago, 111., 1923 

Gibbel, Dr. J. Paul, and 
Verda, Girard, 111., 1926 

Helser, Albert D., 1922, and 
Lola, Thornville, Ohio, 1923 

Flohr, Earl W., and Ella, 
Vienna, Va., 1926 



INDIA 

Ahwa, Dangs, Surat Dist., 
India 

Garner, H. P., and Kathryn, 

1916 
Royer, B. Mary, 1913 
Anklesvar, Broach Dist., India 

Grisso, Lillian, 1917 

Lichty, D. J., 1902, and Anna, 

1912 
Miller, Sadie J., 1903 
Moomaw, I. W., and Mabel, 

1923 



Missions and Church Promotion § 

March 1, 1930— February 28, 1931 ^ 

Conference Budget ^ 

General Mission Board $275,500 ^ 

Board of Religious Education 21 ,500 || 

General Ministerial Board „ . . 8,500 g& 

General Education Board 5,000 ^ 

American Bible Society 500 3| 

Total $311,000 % 

Send remittances to General Mission Board, Elgin, 111. {* 



Execute Your Own Will 

You do this when you get one of our annuity bonds. It will mean a big 
saving to the Lord's treasury in court costs, and lawyers' and administrators' fees. 

But, if You Make a Will- 

Get good legal help that your will may be properly made. To remember 
missions in your will the following form of bequest is recommended: 

" I give and bequeath to the General Mission Board of the Church of the Brethren, 
a corporation of the State of Illinois 1 , with its principal office at Elgin, Kane County, 

Illinois 1 , its successors and assigns, forever, the sum of dollars 

($ ) to be used for the purpose of the said Board as specified in 

its charter." 

Write for our booklet which tells about annuity bonds and wills 

General Mission. Board 
i Or THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN ^ 

I INCORPORATED "^ 

Elgirv. Illinois 



THE 

MISSIONARY 



Visitor 




Church of the Brethren 



Vol. XXXII 



APRIL, 1930 



No. 4 



Christ's Giving 

The spirit of self-sacrifice 
Stays not to count the price. 

Christ did not of his mere abundance cast 
Into the empty treasury of man's store: 

The First and Last 
Gave until even he could give no more; 

His very living, 

Such was Christ's giving. 

— Jlnna E. Hamilton 



98 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



The Deficit Is Paid 



THIS is the last chance to read about 
the deficit from the typewriter of 
the Visitor editor. A very bold state- 
ment ! I make it to express a hope, a wish, 
yes, even more, a conviction.. To make it 
come true two things are necessary. 

First, contributions from the church will 
need to continue in a normal way. By this 
we mean there dare be no slump in giving 
because the deficit is paid. The Mission and 
Church Promotion program costs $1,000.00 
per day. If receipts from the congregations 
were to fall below the average for the past 
five years we would be endangered with a 
deficit. 

Second, expenditures by the General Mis- 
sion Board will dare be no larger than 
receipts. It is the purpose of the Board to 
control its program on this principle. There 
will come crying needs from the fields. The 
Board being responsive to world needs will 
want to respond. Yet the Board will feel 
to make only such commitments as can be 
paid by funds expected to come in. Some 
would say the Board should spend money 
only after it is received. A good principle 
but with more than 100 missionaries on the 



field their budgets for a year ahead must be 
approved long before the funds are received. 
Some commentators on the deficit situation 
have ventured the guess that a deficit was 
a good club to help raise mission money. 
We earnestly hope this is not true. The 
Visitor wants to present the cause of mis- 
sions, the needs, the plans, the work being 
done and the achievements. The deficit is 
a worn out theme. Yes, we are done talking 
deficit. Please, everybody, help us to stick 
to our statement, No more talk about the 
deficit! 

Life, in its clearest and finest analysis, is 
a Stewardship. To recognize this places one 
in the range to get the right angle of vision 
for the interpretation of life in all its pro- 
portions and all its perspective. 

"The first principle of stewardship is the 
admission and the proud claim that we and 
God are partners ; that God has work which 
he wants done and which will not get done 
unless we do it." 



Meeting the Mission Challenge 

(These are preliminary figures at time of going to press 
before the final closing of books) 

RECORD OF CONGREGATIONS 

Receipts from living donors March 1, 1929, to February 28, 1930, 

credited to congregational sources $343,486.92 

The goal was 313,547.00 

Amount in excess of goal $ 29,939.92 

RECORD OF CHALLENGERS 

Pledges paid before February 28, 1930 $ 17,592.58 

Unpaid pledges 19,910.00 

Cash and pledges from the challengers $ 37,502.58 

GENERAL MISSION BOARD TREASURY STATEMENT 
As of February 28, 1930: 

Income since March 1, 1929 $408,951.24 

Income same period last year 298,023.04 

Expense since March 1, 1929 274,655.43 

Expense same period last year 300,989.87 

Mission surplus February 28, 1930 33,924.34 

Mission deficit January 31, 1930 43,615.72 

Decrease in deficit and increase in surplus, Feb., 1930 77,540.06 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



99 



Swept In by the Tide 



Thousands Die from Famine 

A committee of Chinese and foreigners has 
been recently organized to care for some 
children from the famine region. In the 
adjoining province of Shansi famine condi- 
tions are so terrible that many thousands 
have died and many more thousands will die 
before next harvest. The good people here 
felt helpless to cope with a situation of such 
magnitude, so a group organized themselves 
to bring a hundred or more children out of 
that region and care for them here. — Sara 
Myers. 

Dr. Koo Discusses Attitude of 
Chinese Students 

Dr. T. Z. Wellington Koo, head of the 
Student Department of the Y. M. C. A. in 
China, who has lately returned to that coun- 
try from Europe, has been making an in- 
formal study of the influences affecting 
student life. He reports that politics are still 
the absorbing interest. As to the students' 
reading, he concludes that there is a great 
interest in books that have a proletarian bias 
and that there is a great impatience with 
anything of the romantic type, for which 
there was much enthusiasm ten years ago. 
He is especially impressed by an almost com- 
plete lack of Christian literature in the 
libraries, which he thinks is due, not so 
much to skepticism as to its value, as to an 
unwillingness on the part of the Chinese 
librarians to compromise themselves in the 
eyes of the public by putting Christian books 
on their shelves. 

Missions Versus Flower Memorial 

The Men's Bible Class of the Mount 
Morris Church of the Brethren raised a mis- 
sion offering of $27.00 which they contributed 
to missions in memory of E. P. Trostle, a 
loyal member of their class who recently 
joined the class on the other shore. Brother 
J. P. Holsinger, in writing about it, says 
that the class felt that if Brother Trostle 
could have been consulted, it would have 
met his approval for them to give this mis- 
sion money memorial rather than to purchase 
flowers for his funeral. Brother Holsinger 



says they remembered him with flowers 
while he was living and could enjoy them. 

Friendship Exhibits Received from 
Mexican Children 

An exhibit of Mexican art work, prepared 
by the pupils in industrial schools of Mexico 
as an expression of their friendship for the 
children of the United States, was presented 
to the Committee on World Friendship 
Among Children, March 1, at the Museum 
of Natural History, New York. 

The sending of this exhibit of the arts and 
industries of Mexico has been under the 
direction of Dr. Saenz, Vice-Minister of 
Education in Mexico. There are forty-nine 
separate cases of children's art materials 
and of the products of expert workers in 
lacquer and pottery, one case being detained 
for each state of the Union and one for the 
District of Columbia. 

The preparation of the exhibit has been 
shared in by 1,250,000 children of Mexico as 
their response to the great expression of 
friendship on the part of the children and 
young people of the United States in 1928, 
in sending 30,000 friendship school bags, all 
carrying goodwill letters, to the Mexican 
children. On the placards accompanying 
each of the forty-nine exhibits are words 
of greetings and expression of sincere thanks 
for the " Goodwill Bags " sent to them. 

The plan which was followed in the case 
of the friendship dolls sent to the American 
children by the children of Japan, in accord- 
ance with which they were sent throughout 
the country and were made the occasion of 
more than 1,000 receptions in all parts of the 
land, is to be followed also in the case of 
these Mexican art exhibits. The Committee 
on World Friendship Among Children, 289 
Fourth Avenue, New York, is now arranging 
such an itinerary and church groups or com- 
munities which would be interested in having 
an exhibit may secure it merely by assuming 
the expense of shipping it to the next stop- 
ping place. 

It is expected that the wide attention 
which the Mexican exhibits will receive in 
this country will do much to create a larger 
appreciation of the Mexican people. The 



100 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



Committee on World Friendship is now en- 
gaged in carrying out a new " friendship 
project," this time with the children of the 
Philippine Islands. 

Gandhi Asks for Milk 

Mahatma Gandhi, known as the greatest 
soul power of India, has sent a plea to 
America to assist in improving the cattle and 
increasing the milk supply for the children. 
This subject will be given much study by 
Dr. Kenyon L. Butterfield, agricultural 
leader, now on his way to India on behalf 
of the International Missionary Council. 
Gandhi writes : 

" What American friends may do in giving 
constructive help for the Indian children 
is not to send doles of charity but to send 
expert knowledge in dairying — true philan- 
thropists who will give knowledge for the 
sake of giving it, and who will study the 
condition of India's cattle and show us the 
way of improving our breed and the supply 
of milk from the existing cattle. This idea, 
if it is entertained in a proper spirit, can 
be considerably amplified." 

Rules for Treatment of Foreigners 

The California Commission on Immigration 
has issued the following rules for the Treat- 
ment of Foreigners : 

Don't snub foreign people. Make friends 
of them. 

Don't laugh at their questions about Amer- 
ican life. Answer them. 

Don't profit by their ignorance of Amer- 
ican law. Help remove it. 

Don't mimic their broken English. Help 
correct it. 

Don't call them offensive nick-names. 
How would you like it yourself? 

Don't make the immigrant hate America. 
Make him love America. In other words, 
be an American — and be a Christian. 

Medical Missions 

Dr. Olpp, of the Institute for Tropical 
Diseases in Tuebingen, publishes in his last 
report some very interesting figures about 
medical missions. 

He says that Protestant missions own and 
control 858 hospitals with 31,264 beds. In 



these 389,712 patients have received medical 
attention, out of which 198,844 were operative 
cases. There are 1,686 dispensaries in which 
last year 10,441,539 consultations were held, 
while there were also 137,152 house visits. 

There are now 513 native doctors (male) 
and 99 female doctors in the various fields, 
together with 2,597 male assistants and 2,861 
female, besides 1,085 trained nurses. 

For every 25 mission workers there is 
now one medical missionary. The largest 
number are working in Asia where there 
are 596 male and 321 female doctors, and 640 
foreign nurses. China and India are the 
preferred countries, having in China a total 
of 499 doctors and 327 hospitals with 16,608 
beds. India has 297 doctors, two medical 
schools for women, recognized by govern- 
ment and enormous hospitals. Africa with 
its 140 million natives has however only 157 
doctors among whom 15 are women with 282 
foreign nurses. These few have to fight 
sleeping sickness, yellow fever, tuberculosis, 
syphilis, the evil effects of the slave trade, 
alcohol and the most unhygienic conditions. 

The rest of the missionary medical forces 
are divided among Turkey, Australasia, Latin 
America and the United States. In China 
279 of the hospitals are self-supporting. 

The European participation in this mag- 
nificent work is small in comparison. The 
entire continent furnishes only 89 doctors. 
Great Britain 518 and the United States and 
Canada 700. — Missionary Review of the 
World. 

Recent College Graduates and 
Students Take Notice 

The office of Indian Affairs of the United 
States Department of the Interior is very 
desirous to improve the Indian Civil Service 
and is looking for well-qualified college 
graduates with a spirit of service, to teach 
in boarding schools for Indians. Students 
interested may get further information from 
the Office of Indian Affairs or from the Civil 
Service Commission, Washington, D. C. — 
Christian World Education News Service. 

" When the dust of business so fills your 
room that it threatens to choke you, sprinkle 
it with the water of prayer, and then you 
can cleanse it out with comfort and expedi- 
tion." 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



101 



Sarda Bill Protects from Child 
Marriage 

The Sarda Bill which was passed recently 
in India and is to become a law April 1, 1930, 
is a great move in the right direction. 
A Hindu wrote in the Times of India, " The 
Sarda Bill is very good but it provides only 
for girls and in no way touches the sad 
condition of the Indian widow." He hopes 
that some one will bring in a bill making it 
obligatory for widowers to marry only 
widows. That too will do away with the 
dreadful condition of an old man marrying 
a young girl. It is singular that in 1829 Sati 
was prohibited by law. Both of these bills 
are reforms protecting the womanhood of 
India : one prohibiting widows from burn- 
ing themselves alive on the pyre with their 
husband when he dies, the other freeing her 
from the curse of child marriage. It is hoped 
that other needed reforms will follow soon 
without undue delay. 

Wholesale Marriages to Avoid 
Sarda Bill 

The illiterate and those opposed to the 
Sarda bill are marrying their children whole- 
sale before April 1. Anklesvar alone is 
having over 500 weddings before that date. 
One day there were forty. Other cities are 
doing as badly. Surat with a population of 
60,000 we are told are having 6,000 mar- 
riages to avoid the Sarda bill, and Ahmada- 
bad a still larger city is having 9,000 mar- 
riages. Even babies a few weeks old are 
made victims of their rash parents. 



THE MISSIONARY VISITOR 

Published Monthly by the Church of the 

Brethren through her General Mission Board. 

H. Spenser Minnich, Editor 

Ada Miller, Assistant Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS $1.00 PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH dona- 
tion of four dollars or more to the General Mission 
Board, either direct or through any congregational 
collection, provided the four dollars or more are given 
by one individual and in no way combined with 
another's gift. Different members of the same family 
may each give four dollars or more and extra sub- 
scriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent 
to persons who they know will be interested in read- 
ing the Visitor. NO VISITOR SUBSCRIPTIONS 
ARE ENTERED UNLESS REQUESTED. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription 
terms do not include a subscription for every four 
dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation 
of four dollars or more, no matter how large the 
donation. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions 
and make remittances payable to GENERAL MIS- 
SION BOARD, 22 S. STATE ST., ELGIN, ILL. 

Entered as second class matter at the postoffice at 
Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 

Membership 
OTHO WINGER, North Manchester, Ind., 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, McPherson, Kans., 1908-1934. 
H. H. NYE, Elizabethtown, Pa., 1923-1932. 
J. B. EMMERT, La Verne, Calif., 1924-1931. 
LEVI GARST, Salem, Va., R. R. 1, 1925-1930. 
J. K. MILLER, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1928-1933. 
L. C. MOOMAW, Roanoke, Va., R. R. 2, 1928-1932. 

Officers 

OTHO WINGER, President, 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, Vice-President, 1908-1934. 
CHARLES D. BONSACK, General Secretary, 1921.* 
H. SPENSER MINNICH, Assistant Secretary and 

Editor Missionary Visitor, 1918. 
M. R. ZIGLER, Home Mission Secretary, 1919. 
CLYDE M. CULP, Treasurer, 1920. 

Note. — The bold type date indicates the year when 
Board Members were first elected, the other date the 
year when Board Members' terms expire. 

* Although Bro. Bonsack was not elected secretary 
until 1921 he has been connected with the Board 
since 1906. 



" Don't Let Loose " 

During the speech of King George, opening the late Disarmament Conference, 
some one tripped over the generator wires of the Columbia Broadcasting Company, 
tearing them all loose and interrupting the service. The chief operator quickly 
grasped the loose wires in his bare bands and for twenty minutes the current 
passed through his twitching flesh while repairs were being made. His hands were 
slightly burned, but through his body the words of the King passed on to the 
millions of listeners and were heard distinctly. Without his courage and endurance, 
the King's message would have failed to reach its destination. 

The King of heaven has chosen to send his message to a lost world through 
human wires. Every faithful missionary, and every Christian who gives his 
support, is a human wire through which the King's Voice is reaching the lost with 
a message of peace, vastly more important than the message from London. The 
Church of God needs more men who are willing to TAKE HOLD and HOLD 
ON. — The Brethren Missionary. 



102 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



Our Most Difficult Task in China 



E. M. WAMPLER* 



WITH all great opportunities and 
tasks there come ' problems. Some 
problems are of a physical nature 
and can be solved rather easily; others have 
a spiritual or internal bearing and are there- 
fore much more difficult of solution. We 
often see statements in regard to the hard- 
ships that the foreign representative who 
does mission work has to endure, and we 
get the idea that he has a number of 
hard things to bear for the sake of his 
Master. There are a number of difficult 
things to overcome both physically and 
spiritually as one enters the mission field; 
but when they are all grouped together they 
are as nothing in comparison to the joys 
and pleasures which we have. 

At this time let us think together on some 
of the problems we have to face in China 
today. The one which is the most difficult 
for me can be solved only by consecrated 
Christians working together for the expan- 
sion of Christ's kingdom. 

The most difficult problem is not the 
language, yet all of us at times find it diffi- 
cult to be understood. How we wish to 
be more fluent with the language and be 
able to convey our meaning without the 
shadow of a doubt to those among whom 
we work. When we use every expression 
we know and say it in several different 
ways, to have the individual turn away and 
say, " I don't understand," is discouraging. 
In a mission group you often hear prayers 
for unstopped ears so that we can hear the 
proper tones, and then loosened longues so 
we can pronounce them properly. There are 
many beautiful bits of verse and proverbs 
which mean so much to us, yet language 
fails when we try to translate them. It is 
difficult to express one's cherished thoughts 
in another language, so they are often left 
unuttered. 

Neither is our most difficult problem living 
conditions. We at times long for some of 
the good things our friends have at home — 
telephone, radio, cars to use in visiting our 
friends, and most of all good lectures and 
sermons, fellowship in song, and good music. 
In our small group we have some of these 



Missionary, Liao Chou, Shansi, 



gifts but we are not experts along these 
lines and, too, we soon get out of practice 
and feel the need of refreshing. The houses 
we live in are very comfortable, as much so 
as many of the houses in America. We 
appreciate these very much for when we 
are out traveling in village after village we 
are glad to get back home and have the 
privilege of a bath. We are able to» ap- 
preciate a rocking chair, a bed with springs 
and free from pests. Along with this some 
of us have to face the problem of having 
our children away from home in school nine 
months out of a year. It takes a letter a 
week to come and with the fastest car you 
can take it requires two and one-half or 
three days to get to your child. All parents 
who have children have to face this problem 
sooner or later but this is by far not the 
most difficult one. 

Our most difficult problem is not illiteracy. 
When we travel through the villages preach- 
ing we find so many who cannot read that 
we often wish China had more and better 
schools and teachers. We think, " If these 
people could only read we could place tracts 
and Bibles in their hands and they soon 
would become Christians." Their inability 
to read slows down the work of evangelism 
very much. This is a problem which we 
have to face, but it is not our most difficult 
problem. Neither is the persecution which 
the Christians must endure the thing that 
hinders most the advance of the church in 
China. Most men and women think several 
times before they break away from their 
social and racial customs and take on Chris- 
tian principles. If they are not persecuted 
so much physically they are persecuted 
socially. The village is always ready to 
make it hard for the men or the women 
who leave their theatricals and their con- 
tributions for the same, and other com- 
munity activities in which a Christian can- 
not participate. His influence is lessened and 
every one seems to think he has a right 
now to impose on this one who has made 
a stand for Christ. But men and women 
in China are willing to undergo all this for 
their Master. 

(Continued on Page 118) 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



103 



Stewardship and Missions 

FREDERICK A. AGAR* 



IN presenting this analysis and discussion 
of the relationship between Stewardship 
and the Missionary Enterprise, five main 
topics are brought to your attention : 

1. What is Stewardship? 2. What is the 
relationship between Stewardship and Mis- 
sions? 3. What are some of the causes for 
the failure to produce adequate support for 
missionary enterprises? 4. Would genuine 
stewardship produce adequate support for 
missions? Here are some conclusions and 
suggestions : 

It will be seen at once that this discus- 
sion not only concerns 
foreign missions, but 
the whole of the mis- 
s i o n a r y enterprise. 
This is necessarily so 
because the demand 
for larger support on 
the part of foreign 
mission leaders is 
echoed by the leaders 
of every other mis- 
sionary enterprise con- 
nected with denomina- 
tional life. 



What Stewardship 
Is 

Stewardship is the 
Lordship of Christ 

recognized and acknowledged. To enlarge 
this definition it might be put in this man- 
ner: Stewardship is the absolute acknowl- 
edgment of the Lordship of Jesus Christ 
with the consequent administration of life 
and all its ways under the will and love 
of the Father Owner. If this definition is 
correct, stewardship first of all concerns and 
is vitally related to life and all of living. 
Stewardship should produce a separated por- 
tion for all gospel purposes of the time, 
energy, talent, personality and substance or 
property. Stewardship, therefore, concerns 
far more than a steward's money. In fact, 
it is seldom possible to produce a steward's 
money with regularity and proper balance 
until first of all there has been produced a 



If under proper stewardship every 
church member separated the first- 
fruits of all increases to the extent 
of at least a tithe and on the first 
day of the week presented himself 
and his substance before God and 
gave in balanced proportions to the 
gospel work at home and abroad, 
there would be money enough in 
hand in five years to preach the 
gospel to all the world. — Frederick 
A. Agar. 



worship, witnessing and working Christian 
life. To elicit the money only without these 
is a violation of proper stewardship purposes 
and tends to the ultimate loss of the money. 
Stewardship is not only individual, but group. 
A church is a group steward. A foreign 
mission board is a group steward. It is pos- 
sible in an individual capacity to be a good 
steward, and yet fail in one's group steward- 
ship, or vice versa. A steward, individual 
or group, is a servant under the orders of 
an owner. He is either faithful, or a robber 
and betrayer. The failure properly to apply 
the principle of stew- 
ardship is the real 
cause for the failure 
to supply the proper 
financial resources for 
the missionary m a n- 
date. 



Secretary of Stewardship and Church Efficiency, 
Northern Baptist Convention. 



Relation Between 

Stewardship and 

Missions 

Stewardship is essen- 
tial to Christian living 
and the acceptance of 
the Lordship of Jesus 
Christ. The same is 
absolutely true con- 
cerning missionary 
living. Primarily, mis- 
sionary living is not a matter of individual 
belief or of like or dislike, but is essentially 
part of the Lordship of Jesus Christ that 
relates itself to every believer. In the teach- 
ings of God's Word it seems plain that the 
acceptance of the Saviorhood of Jesus is an 
essential acceptance of his Lordship because 
he is at one and the same time both Savior 
and Lord. The rejection of his Lordship is 
vitally and essentially the rejection of his 
Saviorhood. Missions comprise an essential, 
vital fulfillment of the person, plan, and 
purpose inherent in the Lord Jesus Christ. 
Is not the repudiation of missions an actual 
denial of Christ's Saviorhood and sover- 
eignty? Stewardship and missions bear the 
same relation to each other in the spiritual 
life that veins and blood bear to each other 
in the physical realm. Without veins, blood 



104 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



would be of little use and without blood the 
veins would be but a dead channel. 

Inasmuch as missions or the salvation of 
the world was the effect of a great cause 
in the person of the Lord Jesus Christ, it 
would seem impossible to differentiate be- 
tween stewardship and missions, or missions 
and stewardship. They are one and the 
same. To be a good steward is to be mis- 
sionary. To be missionary is an acknowl- 
edgment of good stewardship. Missions and 
stewardship are not matters of voluntarism, 
but part of the Lordship of Christ. Can 
there be a basic right to voluntarism in mis- 
sions when there is a specific command to 
every individual from their Lord Jesus 
Christ? Voluntarism was exercised and sur- 
rendered in the giving of oneself to the 
Master. To accept the Saviorhood of Jesus 
and reject his Lordship is trifling with life 
and love. The plan, of Christ to save a 
lost world is inseparable from the person of 
Christ. To accept one is to accept the other ; 
to reject one is to repudiate both. A steward 
carries the cross given by his Master. The 
missionary enterprise is essentially a part 
of the stewardship of life and is vitally part 
of cross-bearing. 

Why the Local Church Fails in 
Mission Support 

The failure of the local church to produce 
adequate support for the missionary enter- 
prise is partly due to conditions in the local 
church. The one great first cause is an 
undisciplined, untaught, easy-going, com- 
promising church membership. Here are 
some other related causes and effects : 

(1) Expensive new edifices. They entail 
increased overhead. These are essential to 
the future kingdom enterprise. 

(2) Disintegration of the unity of the local 
church. Segments of the local church tend 
to become self-sufficient and unbalanced in 
their collection and distribution of money. 
Often they are strongly anti-missionary. 
They are easy marks for itinerant sob stories. 
These church segments distribute large sums 
of money which do not always appear in 
church records. 

(3) Disloyalty of local members to the 
denominational program. They have joined, 
but have not united in every case. Unde- 
nominational and independent missions get 



much money as they often have freedom of 
approach. 

(4) Cowardice in dealing with incoming 
members. Missions are not considered es- 
sential to Christian living. A profession of 
faith in the Lord Jesus Christ should es- 
sentially compel participation in missions. 

(5) Fear of present members. A com- 
promising attitude which allows them to 
reject the plans of the Lord Jesus Christ. 
In the face of a mandate from the Lord 
Jesus Christ the church trifles with coward- 
ice and fear and as a result, the members 
are saying with one side of their mouth a 
word of acceptance and with the other side 
of their mouth they are saying the opposite, 
a thing of rejection. Therefore, in logic they 
have said nothing. 

(6) Untrained, unenlisted lay leadership, 
due often to an unprepared, self-seeking 
clergy. 

(7) Failure to realize a relationship be- 
tween the center and the extremity of the 
body of Christ. A man may die at the 
center from a simple injury to an extremity. 

(8) Easy-going rather than a cross-bear- 
ing discipleship. 

(9) It is not understood that primarily 
missions is not a matter for our belief or our 
like or dislike, but is essentially a matter of 
the Lordship of Jesus Christ. 

(10) A divisive educational program, much 
of which is harmful because directly related 
to money production. Educational values 
are almost always slighted for present pro- 
duction of moneys. 

(11) Men are too often charged with the 
sole care of the local church finances and 
consequently local church maintenance and 
missionary production get out of balance, or 
the local church gets its money at the ex- 
pense of missions. 

(12) A fair amount of mission money is 



"Not what we give but 
what we share, 

For the gift without the 
giver is bare" 




April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



105 



constantly being misappropriated by church 
officers for local church expenses. 

(13) The individual of more than ordinary 
possibilities has often been neglected and 
" protected " against personal solicitation. 
Many well-to-do people will not give all they 
have to distribute through local church 
channels. Here lies a large field for per- 
sonal cultivation. 

(14) Too often we have used high pres- 
sure methods which tend ultimately to lose 
both the person and his or her money. 
Emotion and need are secondary; love and 
obedience are first. We have gone after 
the same people again and again. 

(15) The present beggar is more obvious 
than the faraway unsaved. But the near-by 
beggar is often a fraud or grafter, while the 
distant unsaved is in fact the one whose real 
keeper we are. The near-by orphanage can 
often be sold easier than the one across 
the water, unless the basic functions of a 
Christian steward have been reached. 

(16) Missionary education and stewardship 
are in reality like the two lungs intended 
to produce proper respiration. One has been 
neglected, while the other has made unsup- 
ported advance. 

(17) We have gone after money instead 
of the person. Get a life right with the 
Lord and money must be produced by that 
life for all kingdom purposes. Churches have 
sought money and neglected people, whereas 
a proper spiritual cultivation and education 
would produce people and their money for 
all purposes. 

(18) A plea based on needs and vision 
alone is unsound and defeats itself in the 
end. Obedience and love are basic and 
essential to Christianity. 

Without the local churches and in the 
missionary organizations are found some 
causes for the present failure to provide 
adequate resources for the missionary enter- 
prise. 

Missionary organizations have tried to 
erect a superstructure of missionary infor- 
mation and interest without having built a 
foundation on which to stand the super- 
structure. Here is the proof : 

(1) Less than five per cent of church 
members have any vital relation to mis- 
sionary work in their own neighborhood. 

(2) Less than thirty-three per cent of 
church members invest any money in mis- 



sionary enterprises Half of that group pay 
only a small inadequate amount. Just 
enough to " get by with." 

(3) Missionary organizations often pro- 
mote group production through segments of 
the local church while practice tends to 
destroy the processes of proper individual 
production paid through the church mis- 
sionary treasury. 

(4) Concreting is dangerous except where 
there is a developed stewardship obedience. 
It has a tendency to develop narrowness and 
pride rather than breadth of character and 
internationalism. It is one of the " easy 
ways " of producing immediate moneys. 

(5) Some missionary leaders often are not 
averse to encouraging the production of 
moneys by illegal, unjust, unspiritual and 
profit-seeking mean^. This defeats spiritual 
production very quickly and ultimately de- 
stroys it. 

(6) Money needs have often obscured a 
greater need of life and love. Money has 
been sought regardless of life and love. 
There must always be spiritual compensa- 
tions for money invested by any child of 
God. We are trying to sell missions on 
the basis of needs and opportunities, or emo- 
tions and prejudices (likes and dislikes) 
rather than upon Lordship, oneness with 
him, obedience, and love. These are the 
basic needs of stewardship. 

The missionary cause has a divided front 
in the face of its constituency, but there is 
improvement in this direction. 

(1) Home as against foreign. There has 
been competition rather than cooperation. 

(2) There is danger in the teaching, " For 
Ourselves — for Others," when used harm- 
fully to differentiate between two phases of 
what is one essential kingdom task. 

(3) The piratical approach of irregular 
undenominational and interdenominational 
pieces of work have a deleterious effect on 
the denominational enterprise. Loyalty in 
love needs to be taught in the churches. I 
have no right to support any other woman, 
not even my mother, at the expense of my 
wife's proper and necessarily first support. 

(4) The chaotic divisive condition of the 
present, missionary appeal is still very ap- 
parent. Each cause is still largely seeking 
to fill its own needs regardless of others. 

(5) It is tragically true that two-thirds of 
24,000,000 people in the churches virtually 



106 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



reject Christ's world plan and yet expect a 
salvation for themselves through the rejected 
plan of world salvation. 

(6) Theological differences. These tend to 
disloyalty in money support and lead to the 
diversion of God's moneys. 

(7) Emotional production or the sob story. 
This often leads to regret and anger. Does 
not basically build character. 

What a Real Stewardship Would Do 

Finally, let us ask the question whether a 
real stewardship on the part of the church 
members would produce adequate support 
for missions. The stewardship teaching is 
perhaps a matter of quite recent develop- 
ment. At least, this is true concerning the 
intensive presentation of stewardship princi- 
ples and practices. Before this period, stew- 
ardship existed in many a life, but it had 
not become generally articulate. Since this 
intensive presentation of stewardship began, 
the production of money for Kingdom and 
church purposes has largely increased. This 
is true even when one remembers the les- 
sening of dollar values and the smaller 
spending value of the dollar. If under a 
proper stewardship every church member 
separated the first-fruits of all increases to 
the extent of at least a tithe and on the first 
day of the week presented himself and his 
substance before God and gave in balanced 
proportions to the gospel work at home and 
abroad, there would be money enough in 
hand in five years to preach the gospel to 
all the world. 

More money is being produced from some 
church members than ever before, but the 
range of distribution is wider than ever and 
more unbalanced than in previous years. 
Part of this advance can be definitely 
credited to stewardship and church efficiency 
teaching. 

The range in distribution covers : local 
church maintenance ; local church buildings ; 
denominational missions and beneficence in 
the general program ; schools and colleges ; 
local denominational institutions such as 
orphanages and hospitals; sectional church 
group giving. Most of this is wasteful of 
resources. A camera for a doctor when he 
needed bandages through an increased 
budget ; undenominational and interdenomi- 
national causes properly constituted; waste 



causes, such as cannot obtain support 
through regular channels, so are presented 
irregularly. Competitive, individual or fraud- 
ulent pieces of so-called missionary work; 
charities not connected with gospel channels. 
At least six of these channels of distribution 
are related to forms of foreign mission work. 
It needs, therefore, to be recognized that 
there is a problem of distribution as well 
as a problem of production. To produce, 
and then distribute improperly is to face 
defeat. Only a real constructive stewardship 
will cause a proper balance to be maintained 
in individual distribution. 

Conclusions and Suggestions 

When a full understanding of all the facts 
involved has not been arrived at, any pres- 
entation based on partial figures of mis- 
understood conditions will not help the situa- 
tion, but will hinder the realization of what 
is really to be desired. Conditions are far 
more revealing than figures that can be mis- 
understood or misapplied. Special pleading 
based on a presentation of partial statistics 
does more harm than good. The study that 
needs to be made must not be simply on 
behalf of one great phase of our whole task, 
but in the interests of all phases and the 
whole missionary task of the local church. 
The seat of most of our difficulties lies in 
the life of our local churches and in the 
places from whence comes their leadership. 
If this little presentation should lead up to 
a thorough study of all that is involved in 
missionary support, the purpose of the 
United Stewardship Council will have been 
accomplished. To such an end we pledge 
our support. 

There are several suggestions that might 
be offered here in ending this preliminary 
analysis. 

1. There is an immediate need of keeping 
up the interest of present producers by 
constant cultivation and information, sep- 
arate and apart from a definite appeal for 
money. 

2. It needs to be made plain that our 
missionary agencies are not beggars appeal- 
ing for charity, but are in fact the individual 
stewards in the membership of the local 
churches, obeying their Lord's dearest desire 
and essential will through a group steward- 
ship. 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



107 



3. Our missionary forces must assume a 
vital share in the task of reaching for all 
of the Lord's purposes the unenlisted part 
of the local church membership. About 
seventy per cent of 24,000,000 church mem- 
bers are in this class. To this group no 
primary approach can wisely be made for 
money alone. The quest must be for all of 
life and love. Yet from this group must 
largely come the added and adequate re- 
sources needed to do a complete piece of 
gospel work around the world. They con- 
stitute today the undiscovered, unopened 
gold mine in the kingdom of God. 

4. The basic causes in the local churches 
behind present tendencies of distribution 
need to be studied and better understood, 
then correction must follow. Now many of 
them are basically wrong and unwisely 
wasteful of God's moneys and are generally 
misunderstood. 

5. We need to focus attention on methods 
of receiving and dismissing church members. 
There is not Scriptural teaching for any 
method, but there is an expectation that 



these things will be done decently and in 
order so that God will be honored and his 
kingdom purposes served. Here is a chance 
to make practical the repeated utterances 
concerning church union. Until we can 
work together for such an objective, there 
is no use in planning a mechanical union. 
6. Finally, the hope is expressed that be- 
fore it is too late a basic and sound policy 
of . stewarding incoming members of mis- 
sionary churches will be insisted on, in 
order that those faraway groups of nationals 
shall not be troubled by the careless han- 
dling of new-born souls that prevails at 
home, and that on the threshold of the new 
and spiritual life the native Christians may 
be taught to be good stewards of all of life 
and of its elements of time, energy, talent, 
personality and money. If we can save the 
missionary churches from the tragic money 
condition that confronts us at home, we 
shall greatly advance the kingdom of God. 
To these ends the United Stewardship Coun- 
cil again pledges its persistent and loyal 
support. — Watchman Examiner. 



A Christmas in Sweden 



LOIS D. NORRIS* 



WE have always been told that Santa 
Claus is a very busy fellow, but 
we didn't know how much he really 
has to do until we spent a Christmas in 
this interesting country of Sweden. Since 
the sun sets here much earlier than in the 
United States, Santa must come to Sweden 
before he visits the boys and girls in 
America. Santa Claus is known here as 
Jul Tomten and he prefers to come into 
the homes at six o'clock Christmas eve while 
the family is gathered about the tree. Then 
he can ask father and mother if the boys 
and girls have been obedient during the past 
year so he will know how many gifts to 
leave. 

But Santa is not the only one who has 
much preparation to make for Swedish 
Christmas. Two weeks before Christmas 
mother must buy " lutfisk," a dried fish, and 
put it to soak, until a few days before 
Christmas, in an alkaline solution made with 
lime. Then it is put into clear water until 



Began work in Sweden, August, 1929. 



December 24 when it is prepared for the 
evening meal. After such treatment the 
lutfisk would be rather tasteless alone, but it 
is served with a good mustard sauce, pota- 
toes cooked in salt water, and rice cooked 
in milk and seasoned with salt and sugar 
and a generous sprinkling of cinnamon. 

Besides this preparation there must also 
be a thorough housecleaning before Christ- 
mas. Floors must be spotless, windows, 
curtains, and woodwork all clean, silverware 
and brass door knobs and water faucets 
polished — everything must be spick and 
span. But labor must cease at six o'clock 
Christmas eve to be ready for the Jul Tom- 
ten's arrival and the distribution of gifts 
from the big clothes basket that has been 
set near the tree. This is a jolly time as 
the youngest member of the family carries 
to each a mysterious package. Then there 
must be candy, nuts, and cookies. 

For the dinner on Christmas day ham 
takes the place of the American turkey or 
chicken. There must be a variety of breads, 



108 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



too, but special dinners are 
generally more simple here than 
in American homes. 

However, Christmas does not 
end December 25. In Sweden 
it continues for twenty days, 
and here in the city of Malmo 
the band plays music in the 
city square to usher in the 
great celebration, and again on 
January 13 it plays to remind 
us that Christmas is past. Per- 
haps this long duration can be 
explained by the fact that 
Sweden takes this occasion to 
do some of the things that are 
done in the States at other 
times of the year. For in- 
stance, the cemeteries, which 
are well kept throughout the 
year, must have additional flow- 
ers, evergreens and wreaths. 
During these twenty days and the prepara- 
tion for them, the city takes on a holiday 
appearance. The already splendid markets 
are made more attractive and the shop 
windows are made to look their best. In 
fact the displays are so special for the two 
Sunday evenings preceding Christmas that 
many people cannot go to church. Streets 
are crowded with sight-seers. 

These attractions, however, do not keep 
all the people from church, for true Chris- 
tians in Sweden as in other lands desire to 
have a Christian Christmas. All the churches 
observe Christmas, but we can tell best 
about our own services since they are the 
ones in which we have participated. Special 
programs were held at Betesda, the Church 
of the Brethren in Malmo, Christmas day 
at seven A. M. and five P. M., and special 
meetings continued averaging about one for 
each of the twenty days of Christmas. 

On the second day of Christmas, the chil- 
dren of our Sunday-school gave their pro- 
gram. There were recitations, exercises, and 
special music. Most of the singing was ac- 
companied by guitars. At the close of this 
program each boy and girl received a paper 
bag containing candy, nuts and an orange. 

There was a place in the Christmas cele- 
bration for the older people, too. For sev- 
eral weeks, poor, aged people have been 
coming to the parsonage for tickets which 




BETESDA, the Church of the Brethren in Malmo, Sweden 



entitled them to a warm meal served on the 
evening of December 30. Other features of 
the occasion were a talk by Brother Graybill 
and music by the young people. 

The young people also had meetings of 
their own, including a feast for the Young 
People's Bible Class held in our home. These 
young people contribute to most of our 
service by furnishing special music. They 
like to sing to the accompaniment of guitars. 

We heard the greeting " God Jul " until 
it sounded as familiar to us as " A Merry 
Christmas," but when Christmas day was 
past the Swedish greeting changed to "A 
Good Continuation." We trust that the true 
Christmas spirit may continue through the 
year throughout the world where the Gospel 
of Christ is preached and that it may 
speedily extend to those places where his 
name is not known. 

" There is a place upon some distant shore 
Where thou canst send the worker or the 

Word ; 
There is a place where God's resistless 

power 
Responsive moves to thine insistent plea ; 
There is a place, a simple trysting place, 
Where God himself descends and fights for 

thee. 
Where is that blessed place? Dost thou 

ask where? 
O soul, it is the secret place of prayer." 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



109 



The Duplex Envelope System 

MRS. MARGARET J. FACKLER* 



THE Duplex Envelope System has been 
used in churches of several denom- 
inations for many years, and has 
proven very successful. The term " duplex " 
means exactly what the word implies — two 
divisions. One division of the envelope is 
usually labeled " For Others," for " Thou 
shalt love thy neighbor as thyself" (Matt. 
22 : 39) ; and the other division, " For Our- 
selves," " Upon the first day of the week 
let every one of you lay by him in store, as 
God hath prospered him" (1 Cor. 16: 2). 
" For others " signifies benevolences ; " For 
ourselves " takes care of current expenses 
of the church. 

A plan of systematic giving which is ap- 
proved by general church boards is also 
practical for church organizations. Realiz- 
ing this, the Women's Missionary Society 
of the United Lutheran Church in America 
has recommended the use of the duplex 
envelope to local missionary societies, in the 
hope that it will stimulate greater and more 
whole-hearted giving. 

The most important thing about all our 
giving, whether it be to the church, the 
Sunday-school, or the missionary society, is 
what we put into it of ourselves. James 
Russell Lowell, in his beautiful poem, "The 
Vision of Sir Launfal," says : 

" Not what we give, but what we share ; 
For the gift without the giver is bare. 
Who gives himself, with his alms, feeds 

three : 
Himself, his hungering neighbor, and Me." 

It is the heart of the giver, not the size 
of the gift, that counts. The Lord can 
multiply a small gift as he did the loaves 
and the fishes; but he does not need a large 
gift if it is given without love and prayer. 

The aims of our Women's Missionary 
Society may be defined as follows : to extend 
the Kingdom of Christ at home and abroad; 
to cooperate through the established Boards 
in the missionary activities of the church, 
especially those relating to women and 
children; and to train for missionary service 
the young women and children of our 
church. " Go ye, therefore, and teach all 



Vice President Women's Missionary Society of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, Wisconsin Confer- 
ence. 



nations, baptizing them in the name of the 
Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy 
Ghost : teaching them to observe all things 
whatsoever I have commanded you; and lo, 
I am with you always, even unto the end 
of the world" (Matt. 28: 19). 

The offerings of the missionary society are 
largely for missionary causes — foreign, home, 
or inner missions. Our missionary duplex 
envelope has two clearly defined divisions : 
one known as the general fund; the other, 
as the contingent fund. 

The general fund, upon which the budget 
of our women's missionary society depends 
for its maintenance, is administered by the 
executive board of the general society, with 
headquarters at Philadelphia. Under the 
heading of foreign missions, the general fund 
provides the maintenance of kindergartens 
in Africa and Japan ; girls' schools in Africa, 
China, India, Japan and South America; 
three hospitals in India and one in Africa; 
dispensaries and clinics connected with these 
hospitals; industrial training schools; nurses' 
homes; and the salaries of thirty-three 
women missionaries in India, eight in Liberia, 
four in China, and ten in Japan, besides over 
two hundred native Bible women, helpers 
and teachers. 

On the home field, the general fund sup- 
ports the Kounarock Training School in the 
mountains of Virginia ; workers among the 
Jews, and among immigrants ; nurses and 
teachers in Porto Rico and the Virgin Is- 
lands; settlement workers; and assists in the 
erection of churches. 

The contingent fund has three divisions : 
first, the expenses of the local society; 
second, the synodical fees, consisting of the 
conference fund of fifteen cents per member 
per year (to defray conference administra- 
tion and convention expenses) ; the synodical 
fund of twenty-five cents per member per 
year (to defray synodical administration and 
convention expenses) ; and the biennial con- 
vention expense fund of ten cents per mem- 
ber per year (to defray the expenses of the 
general national convention, which meets 
biennially) ; third, synodical and conference 
specials. The various state conferences and 
synodical groups of the Women's Missionary 



110 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



Society of the United Lutheran Church in 
America have individual " specials." For 
example, the Wisconsin conference pays the 
salary of a teacher in the Kounarock Train- 
ing School in Virginia. The synod of the 
Northwest consisting of the Wisconsin, Cen- 
tral, and Western conferences, respectively, 
pays the salaries of a woman missionary in 
Japan, and a woman teacher at the Rocky 
Boy Indian Reservation in Montana. 

To those who are unfamiliar with the 
Duplex Envelope system, it may seem rather 
complicated; but it is in reality, a most 
businesslike and satisfactory means of gath- 
ering funds. There are many who pledge 
a definite sum for each side of the envelope ; 
however, we feel that the ideal gift is a 
free will offering "as the Lord hath pros- 
pered us." 

With our old system of gathering funds, 
each member paid specified monthly dues. 
Then, many societies took additional offer- 
ings : some, a " birthday offering," others, a 
"sunshine offering." As one woman very 
plainly stated it, "There's no use going to 
the missionary society meeting unless you 
have a full pocketbook. There's always an 
offering for one thing or another." Further- 
more, there were women who actually re- 
fused to join the missionary society because 
as they said, " They're always asking for 
money for a dozen different things." 

The modern business man uses the budget 
system. The income of a church is budgeted. 
Housewives run their homes on the budget 
plan. Why then, should not the missionary 
society maintain a budget? All money re- 
ceived through the general fund side of the 
envelope is sent by the local treasurer to 
the treasurer of her conference ; she in turn 
sends it to the synodical treasurer; who 
forwards it to the general treasurer, to be 
added to the budget. The contingent fund 
also is budgeted; and there is enough to 
meet all needs. 

Just as we, as individuals, give special 
gifts at Christmas, Easter, birthdays, and 
so on, to our loved ones, so too, through 
the channel of the Women's Missionary 
Society, we give special offerings throughout 
the year to our Lord. In the Women's 
Missionary Society of the United Lutheran 
Church, these are : first, the thank offering, 
which is a tangible expression of gratitude 
for special blessings, received through our 



thank-oTering boxes; second, the Christmas 
offering which is a gift of love, contributed 
in December to the cause of missions, in 
recognition of God's best gift to the world — 
the Savior of mankind; and third, the 
Lenten self-denial offering, received during 
Lent, a love and self-denial offering, in 
recognition of Christ's supreme sacrifice on 
Calvary. These three offerings are not re- 
ceived through the duplex envelopes. 

Quotations from letters received from 
officers of local societies will show the en- 
thusiasm that is felt because of the duplex 
envelope system. 

One woman writes : " Our society was one 
of the pioneers in adopting the use of the 
duplex envelopes. They have been in use 
for four years, and our members are very 
enthusiastic over them. From the very first 
our receipts began to increase, until during 
the past year our income has more than 
doubled. We think giving through the 
duplex envelope is the most satisfactory and 
profitable way of making a free-will offer- 
ing." 

Every Gospel message that reaches a 
human heart must be spoken by human lips. 
We cannot all carry the Gospel to foreign 
lands ; we cannot all enter active missionary 
service ; but through our gifts and through 
our prayers we can all have a part in helping 
to carry and send the Gospel to the utter- 
most parts of the earth. 

Some witty person once remarked, " There 
are three kinds of givers — the flint, the 
sponge, and the honeycomb. To get any- 
thing out of flint, you must hammer it, and 
then you get only chips and sparks. To 
get water out of a sponge you must squeeze 
it, and the more you squeeze, the more you 
get. But the honeycomb just overflows 
with its own sweetness." 

And so, as we place our offerings in our 
monthly duplex envelopes, so much for the 
general fund, and so much for the contingent 
fund, and as we take note of the objects 
of the offering as printed on the envelopes, 
there will come to our minds these words, 
" Other sheep I have which are not of this 
fold; them also must I bring" (John 10: 16) ; 
and then, we shall sing, 

" Take my silver and my gold, 
Not a mite would I withhold ; 
Take my intellect and use 
Every power as thou shalt choose." 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



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112 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



News from the Fields 



CHINA 
Tai Yuan 

Sarah Myers 

Bank Notes Brought 
Back to Par 

The people of Tai Yuan and the province 
were made happy last week, January 2A, 
when the bank notes in circulation, which 
had depreciated twenty-five cents on the 
dollar, were brought back to par. All who 
wanted to could exchange paper money for 
silver. We hope the soaring prices will drop 
a bit which will be a great help to the many, 
many poor people. 

Chinese Asked to Observe 
Solar New Year 

The Chinese New Year, Lunar Year, has 
for centuries been the most important holi- 
day season of the year for the Chinese. 
The Nationalist Government recently issued 
a mandate for the people to observe the 
Solar New Year, and not their old one 
around which so much sentiment, tradition 
and custom has gathered. However, here 
in Tai Yuan the old New Year was kept with 
all its joys, feasting, worshiping of the gods, 
and settling of accounts. A stroke of the 
pen cannot change an age old custom. 

Churches Unite in 
Evangelistic Effort 

The Christian churches here are looking 
forward to an interesting and valuable week 
of cooperative evangelistic effort. We are 
hoping very much that many will learn of 
Christ as Lord. 

Qible Class Continues 
Over Holiday Season 

A Bible class at the church, composed of 
non-Christian students of the government 
schools of the city, has continued right 
through the holiday season. This is very 
unusual as practically all classes and all 
schools close for at least six weeks over the 
New Year period. 

Liao Chou 

Sunday Afternoon in a 
Neighboring Village 

On Sunday afternoon, Jan. 19, Mr. and 
Mrs. Oberholtzer and Mr. and Mrs. Wampler 
went to a village about seventeen miles from 
Liao Chou. A couple of hours were spent 
there with some of the Christians and their 
neighbors. Before dark they returned to a 
prosperous little village about two miles 
away, where there are several Christians. 
An evangelist is stationed there to help them 
in their Christian growth. The Gospel story 
was gladly told to those who do not yet 
know it, and an effort made to strengthen 



the faith of those who have it already 
planted in their hearts. 

Bible Class for Women 
of Country District 

Work among the women in the country 
district moves slowly on. A small class con- 
vened in Chin Chou this winter for Bible 
study. The little group eagerly pursued 
their studies for about two months under 
the direction of Mrs. Li, one of the Chinese 
evangelists. 

Many Villages Reached by 

Chinese Evangelist and Missionaries 

Mrs. Jen, the elderly lady evangelist, con- 
tinues her visits in the village homes in 
Chin Chou. This fall she visited seventeen 
different villages and stayed a few days at 
each place. Miss Senger accompanied her 
to a number of these villages, and went to 
six others unaccompanied. 

In Yu She, Misses Senger and Ulrey 
traveled to ten different villages, visiting 
Christians. The women and children are 
responding more freely to teaching and 
Christian contacts. A trip was also made to 
Ho Shun by the same parties, where three 
places were visited. The people are eager 
for more help by the women evangelists. 

Two women have been working in the 
Ma Tien district visiting the villages where 
they are invited. They got to six villages, 
staying a few weeks at each. It takes many 
trips and many days at a place among the 
same people to sow the seed that will grow 
into a Christ-like character. They are learn- 
ing a little more each trip. 

Purpose of the Five Year 
Forward Movement 

With the opening of 1930 a movement has 
begun in the Christian church throughout 
China. It is called, " The Five Year For- 
ward Movement." Its purpose is to hasten 
the fulfillment of Christ's great commission, 
to foster more Christ-like living among the 
members of the church, and to meet the 
deep religious needs of the people. 

Liao Chou Pastor Enlists Help of 
Members to Promote Movement 

In behalf of this new movement our Liao 
Chou Chinese pastor, Mr. Chang Tzu Hsiu, 
was sent to Peiping a few months ago to 
attend a conference promoting this cause. 
Since his return he has preached a couple 
of enlightening sermons on the purpose and 
hope of the movement, and has called sev- 
eral meetings of our Liao members to enlist 
their help in this work and make plans for 
the same. 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



113 



Special Prayers for the 

Five Year Forward Movement 

Our several mission schools in Liao, the 
Boys', the Girls' and the Women's School, 
have each given over every Wednesday 
morning chapel service for special, definite 
prayer in behalf of the above mentioned pro- 
gram. Special classes have been opened 
among both the men and women of the 
city for reviving lukewarm Christians and 
for instructing prospective converts. 

Bible Class Women Plan Program 
of Personal Evangelism 

A number of the women of our Liao 
Women's Bible School have chosen an in- 
dividual, either in the school or outside, for 
whom they are especially praying and defi- 
nitely working to lead them to Christ this 
year. Their efforts are first directed in 
behalf of the unsaved in their own families. 
They have each chosen one who desires to 
read, that they might personally do the work. 
These women are those who cannot leave 
their home and go to school because of home 
duty. While teaching them to read they 
will make a specialty of teaching the Chris- 
tian doctrine, looking forward to leading 
them to Christ. The one passion and prayer 
of these workers, as well as others through- 
out this great land, is, " Oh Lord, revive thy 
Church, beginning with me." 

Ping Ting Chou 

Emma Horning 

Week of Prayer Observed 
in Women's School 

The New Year was opened with the Week 
of Prayer. The Christians gathered each 
afternoon in the women's school chapel and 
joined their prayers with like services all 
over the world. Their earnest prayers for 
love, peace and righteousness in the church 
here as well as in other parts of the world, 
certainly will bring forth fruit in the coming 
year. Jan. 29 a similar joint prayer meeting 
was held. The theme was religious educa- 
tion in the home, led by Sister Schaeffer. 
Many earnest prayers were offered for the 
Christian parents, that they may teach the 
children to live the Christian life irt the 
home as a foundation of their future living. 

A New Generation in the Church — 
Tragic Death of One Child 

A new generation is growing up in the 
church for many of the young people are 
now being married. Some of them already 
have fine little families from which we can 
expect much in the future. Recently four 
such babies came to brighten the hearts of 
their parents and receive Christian training. 
Another was taken from us. In a moment 
of carelessness the child fell off the kong, 
at the same time pulling a kettle of hot 



water over itself. It was taken to the hospi- 
tal but lived only a few days. It was the first 
born child and the mother and grandmother 
had practiced all the rules of hygiene on 
it with success and he was a beautiful boy. 
He was born on Christmas day, a year ago, 
so they considered him a special blessing 
from heaven, but now he is gone and they 
are very sad. 

Vacation Season for Pupils — 
Mothers Continue Their Work 

All the schools closed the middle of the 
month for the holiday season. Most of the 
boys and girls have gone home for a good 
time over the Chinese New Year, however 
most of the women of the Bible school con- 
tinue to live with their children in the school 
court and ply their needles night and day, 
making the beautiful applica work to send 
home for the various aid societies to sell. 
It is a means of making the work on the 
field more self supporting. 

Assistant Principal of Girls' 
School Is Married 

As soon as school closed Miss Teng, as- 
sistant principal of the girls' school, was 
married, but will still continue teaching for 
us in the spring. She is a fine, sincere, 
earnest Christian and her quiet, unassuming, 
humble, life has meant everything to our 
school this year. This is the second assistant 
principal of the girls' school to be married 
within a few months. Miss Wang was 
married and went with her husband to 
Nanking where he is in business. 

Missionaries Assist City Official 
in Leaving City 

Our city official has been appointed to a 
higher office in Tai Yuen. He left some days 
before his family. His wife is in delicate 
health, so when she left they asked us if 
we would take her to the train in our auto. 
The car is in a very dilapidated condition 
and we were rather ashamed to use it in 
their departure but it was the best to be 
had, in fact the only one in the city, so 
we consented. Our streets are so narrow 
and winding that we very seldom attempt 
to enter the city with the car, but on this 
occasion we made an attempt to get as near 
their home as possible. Bro. Flory suc- 
ceeded in getting it to the foot of the cliff 
on which the upper city is built, not far 
from the official residence, from which she 
was brought in a rikshaw. They were very 
grateful for our assistance in getting the 
family to the train. We are sorry to have 
them leave for they have given ten years of 
faithful service to the city. But the new 
official who is to arrive next month is much 
the same kind of a man and favorable to 
Christianity, for which we are very thankful. 



114 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



News of the Mission Family — 
Mission Station in Darkness 

Sister Edna Flory and the head Chinese 
nurse of the hospital have gone to Shanghai 
to attend the Nurses' Convention, which 
meets the first of next month. Sister Cripe 
spent a week visiting the workers at "Wis- 
teria Cottage " during the holiday season. 
It was most interesting to hear her tell of 
the opening of her work at Yu Hsien. Sister 
Schaeffer spent ten days visiting friends at 
Tai Yuen and Shou Yang. Verna Ruth 
Flory has been sick for over a month. Her 
condition was a mystery to the doctors. 
Finally they gave her treatments for malaria 
and also rheumatism and now she is im- 
proving and able to be up part of the day. 
All of our institutions and hopes were 
plunged into darkness for some time because 
of trouble in the electric plant. Bro. Bright 
made a rush trip to Tientsin for repairs and 
now we have the usual amount of light 
again. 

INDIA 

Anklesvar 

Sadie J. Miller 

McCann Memorial Church 
Nearing Completion 

The new church building at this station 
is gradually nearing completion. It is 
located about half-way between this place 
and the Vocational School, as fine a location 
as could be found anywhere. We are 
specially glad to mention this on account of 
the good brethren and sisters in America 
who have contributed to the building and 
also the land upon which the church is built. 
This you recall is to be the McCann Me- 
morial Church in honor of the missionary 
who so nobly started the work at this 
station and gave his life for the people about 
Anklesvar and in Rajpipla State. It is very 
fitting that there should be a church in his 
name. 

Four Leave on Furlough — 

Other Workers Fill the Ranks 

We are always loath to see our workers 
leave us even on much needed rest and fur- 
lough. Anklesvar has been called upon to 
bid adieu to six of their number — Bro. I. 
W. Moomaw and family, Bro. Long and 
Beulah Woods. They : 11 left us in Novem- 
ber and December but we are glad for Bro. 
Lichty and wife who are here to help fill 
these ranks. Miss Widdowson was asked 
to take the place of Miss Woods until Miss 
Shickel arrives. This has made a vacant 
place in the work at Umalla, in Rajpipla 
State, but we trust not for a long time. 

Offering Taken for 
Poor, Blind Christian 

At the Sunday school teachers' meeting 
mention was made of a poor Bhil Christian 



in a near-by village having gone blind and 
must go begging from house to house for 
food to keep himself alive. A few days 
later one of the girls came to the bungalow 
with quite a nice little collection, saying, 
" We have made up this offering for our 
poor blind brother in Kosamadi, so please 
see that he is sent to Bulsar to the hospital 
for an operation that may restore his sight. 
We expect to see to it that a general solici- 
tation is made and the brother be sent for 
the needy operation." You see by this that 
there is a response to needy conditions of 
our people, for which we are very grateful 
indeed. The Lord bless them and help them 
to have such a fine spirit growing which 
insures the type of Christian character that 
the Lord delights to see. 

Vada 

Alice Ebey 

Dispensary Service 

Encourages Friendliness 

There were 22,494 patients served in the 
little dispensary here at Vada during 1929. 
This service increases friendliness among all 
classes and should open hearts for the Great 
Physician. 

Presenting the Gospel 
Through Hymns 

Mr.. Gaikwad, of Ahmednagar, spent a 
week here in the Bible school giving in- 
structions in Indian music. His aim is to 
use the native instruments and the native 
tunes to draw the people and to sing the 
Gospel. The students received inspiration 
to present the Gospel in this attractive form 
to the villages round about and they are 
planning weekly meetings of this sort in 
several villages. 

Young Christian Mother 
Called by Death 

There has been much sickness around 
during the past few months. It has tended 
to lower the interest in the Bible School. 
The death of the young mother who daily 
met with us in Bible classes cast a gloom 
over the school. The bereaved husband is 
bravely trying to care for three little chil- 
dren in addition to his daily class work. Per- 
haps one purpose of sorrow is to enable 
those who put their trust in the Father 
.to press on bravely doing the daily work 
which he appoints with the sure knowledge 
that no trials or reverses can hinder God's 
own from going forward to the goal. 

The Spirit of Christmas — 
Giving to the Needy 

At Christmas time the little congregation 
decided to use their offering for several very 
poor people outside of our own group. A 
blind woman and her child, a woman whose 
hands are badly crippled, and an old man 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



115 



too feeble to work, each received a cheap 
cloth. These days when it is almost frosty, 
the poor suffer from lack of clothing. 

Dahanu 

Verna Blickenstaff 

Hospital Building Donated 
by Hindu Friend 

Dahanu station seems to be moving for- 
ward with the repair work and new building 
that is going on. The new building men- 
tioned is the one for a family line of rooms 
connected with the hospital. The money for 
this building was donated by one of our 
Hindu friends of th town. He received his 
share of criticism from some of his Hindu 
fellows but there were others who stood 
for him. Speaking of those who find fault, 
one Hindu gentleman said, " They look for 
the mote in their brother's eye but cannot 
see the beam in their own eye." 

Medical Touring Hindered 
by Lack of Workers 

While we rejoice at the progress of our 
work we feel keenly that we are unable to 
care for the medical touring work this year, 
due to furloughed missionaries. Many of 
you know that we use a Ford car for this 
touring and we have used it to great advan- 
tage in such work for two years. We trust 
it will not be long until we can resume that 
work again for it reaches the masses. 

Dr. Metzger Attends Medical 
Conference at Bombay 

Dr. Metzger spent two days in Bombay 
attending the conference of the All India 
Medical Association. She reports a profit- 
able and enjoyable conference. 

Ahwa 

Kathryn Garner 

Women and Young People Organize 
to Fight Intemperance 

Miss Navalkar, national Temperance Or- 
ganizer for the W. C. T. U. from Poona, has 
been with us several days. She gave us two 
lantern lectures. The next evening she gave 
Pilgrim's Progress. During the day she 
talked to the school children and women, 
showing the evils of drink and tobacco. 
Forty-three signed the pledge. We organ- 
ized the women into a W. C. T. U. and the 
boys and girls into the Young People's 
Branch. Intemperance is one of the beset- 
ting sins of the people of the Dang State. 
This work is therefore opportune. We trust 
this will help to keep the people f:om the 
drink curse. 

Dr. Fox Examines 
School Children 

Dr. Fox and family made a visit to Ahwa 
which we greatly appreciated. The examina- 



tion of the school children found them in 
a good condition physically. A few had 
enlarged spleens, otherwise there was general 
good condition of all which is another proof 
that The Dangs, and especially Ahwa, being 
2,200 feet above sea level, is a healthful place 
and has a good climate. 

Bible Class for Boys — 
Preparation for Baptism 

A Bible class is now being conducted, pre- 
paring a class of boys for baptism. The 
same was done last year and because of it 
the boys themselves requested to have one 
this year. There are a dozen in the class. 

Vyara 

Ruth Brooks 

Christian Message Given 
at Annual Fair 

One of the village Christian groups is pre- 
paring to give a Biblical play. The interest 
in this line of work is growing. The annual 
fair has been going on the last week in 
the town of Vyara. Boys and girls of our 
schools have taken their turns in singing at 
the tent which is located in the midst of the 
fairground. The Christian message has been 
given in song, stereopticon slides and per- 
sonal testimony. The crowds ranged from 
300 to 600. 

Wagoner Family on 
Evangelistic Tour 

On December 25 the Wagoner family, with 
their evangelistic group of helpers, started 
for the district. They pitched their tent in 
a well-chosen spot. Here for nearly a week 
the Jesus message was told in the after- 
noons and nights to splendid audiences. Four 
villages have been thus visited to date. They 
have had a splendid welcome at all of them. 
Pray for this work as it continues through 
the touring season. 

Excavating for New 
Church Building 

Excavation for the new church building is 
in progress. Workers, village Christians and 
missionaries have been digging side by side. 
It is a joy, indeed, to think the church is 
to be built at last. 

Umalla-Vali 

Mrs. A. S. B. Miller 

Dr. Fox Busy with Vaccinations 
and Examinations 

On January 3 Dr. Fox and his family came 
to spend a few days at Umalla and Vali. 
They did, however, not find much time to 
visit. Smallpox being in the vicinity caused 
many of the Christians who needed it to be 
vaccinated and all young babies and children 



116 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



to come for vaccination. The extra supply 
of vaccine became exhausted and still there 
was demand. At this time also the boys of 
the Vali Boarding and children of the school 
were all given a thorough physical examina- 
tion. Many came from surrounding towns 
also. 

Groups of Boys in 

Evangelistic Campaigns 

The Umalla-Vali congregation decided to 
carry on a special evangelistic campaign 
during the week Jan. 12-19. One team of 
fifteen boys from the boarding and Vali vil- 
lage, with two teachers traveling on foot by 
Nandod into Gardeshwar, visited twenty-two 
villages and held twenty-five meetings hav- 
ing 1,335 listeners. They sold two New 
Testaments, seventy-five books in all besides 
thirty-one tracts. The people of this area 
for the most part are uneducated. 

Another group of boys numbering fifteen, 
with one of the teachers, starting out in the 
opposite direction from the first group. They 
held meetings in fourteen villages, with 650 
listeners. They sold one Bible, six New Tes- 
taments and a number of such good books as 
Chandra Lela, Sadhu Sunder Singh, song 
books and 10 Gospels. 

Still another group of an average of fifteen 
in number, composed of teachers, farmers 
and school boys, went with Bro. Miller from 
Vali each night to near-by villages. They 
report good meetings in six villages to 270 
listeners. Five New Testaments were sold 
to five non-Christian shopkeepers in Umalla. 
We are glad when people are willing to buy 
the Gospel and read for themselves. 

Women and Girls Conduct 
Evangelistic Tour 

Likewise a team of women and girls with 
myself, number ranging from ten to fifteen, 
went out five mornings of the week to near- 
by villages. Most of the women of Vali 
could not go because of their work in the 
fields. This is harvest season and women 
seem indispensible around such work. Grain 
on the threshing floors must be watched 
from crows and so forth and cotton must be 
picked, but the school girls and others in 
the village came along with us. Several of 
the girls gave up a chance to work and earn 
towards their living. We can admire them 
for it. Certainly the Lord will bless such 
who went in his team. They were very 
helpful in meetings. Their action songs, 
always religious, are well received. After 
each song some woman explained the mean- 
ing. Most of our audiences are uneducated 
women and children. Some heart to heart 
talks were enjoyed. Some 140 heard our 
messages. After nine o'clock no women can 
be found so we must be out early even 
though it is cold. 



Educating for Christian Homes 
in India — Does It Pay? 

Experience in this land convinces me that 
the ignorance, superstition and indifference 
to be found, will vanish only as we succeed 
in getting the people educated beyond all 
this. Maybe our educational program has 
helped to make the deficit, but on the other 
hand it is helping to start Christian families 
for the future. Such homes are not built in 
a day. The influence of a good Christian 
home, of a real live-wire Christian life can- 
not be measured — especially in a land where 
many do not know Christ. 

Bulsar 

J. M. Blough 

Officers and Committees 
Elected for New Year 

Council Meeting was held on the last day 
of the old year and heard the reports of 
committees and elected officers and com- 
mittees for the new year. Elder G. K. 
Satvedi was reelected pastor for 1930. After 
the business meeting was finished, the watch 
meeting was held in which there was a short 
sermon appropriate to the occasion, singing 
of songs and prayer. As the new year came 
in we were bowed in prayer and praise for 
the blessings of the year that had gone and 
consecration of ourselves to God for the year 
that was just beginning. 

Evangelistic Effort — 
Bulsar Library 

The Bulsar church is managing the evan- 
gelistic work of this area and appoints an 
evangelistic committee of five members to 
care for it. During the first week of January 
this committee met and reviewed the work 
of the previous year and arranged to advance 
trie work in the new year. It was encour- 
aging to hear the report of the library in 
Bulsar which was established in 1929. It 
seems to be effective in drawing readers 
daily. The location is not a good one so 
the committee is seeking a better place. 
The pastor reported very interestingly about 
several caste men of Bulsar who are dili- 
gently seeking for the Truth and who come 
to his house every evening for Bible study 
and prayer. Pray that they may be led 
fully into the light of Jesus Christ. 

Health Conditions — 
Hospital Report 

Smallpox is rather bad in India this year 
and has broken out in Bulsar also, so the 
whole community has had a turn at vaccina- 
tion. So far there are no cases in the Chris- 
tian community. The work in the hospital 
and dispensary is going on as usual, the 
doctors and nurses being busy continually. 
Last year Dr. Cottrell expended on hospital 
supplies $8,008.00 but received for fees and 



April 
1930, 



The Missionary Visitor 



117 



medicines $8,223 which means that the 
receipts were $215 in excess of the expendi- 
tures. This is the first time in the experi- 
ence of this hospital that this has occurred, 
and it is due to a larger number of opera- 
tions being performed for which patients 
were able to pay. 

Dr. Fox and Wife Busy with Language 
and Visits to Mission Stations 

Dr. Fox and wife are busy studying the 
language. They have visited the other mis- 
sion station and he helped in vaccinations 
and in the annual medical inspection of 
boarding school children. At most of the 
stations there were many patients who 
claimed his time and attention. We are very 
glad for this addition to our medical force 
on the field. 

W. C. T. U. Organizer 
Gives Lectures 

January 22 Miss Navalkar of Poona, 
W. C. T. U. Organizer for Bombay Presi- 
dency, was with us and gave us three tem- 
perance lectures. One to the Bible School 
students, one in the women's meeting and 
one to a general meeting in the church. 
These lectures were well received. 

AFRICA 

Esther E. Beahm 

Missionaries Attend Conference 
of Northern Nigeria 

The Gibbels spent a few days at Garkida 
on their way to the coast and America. 
They and the Helsers left Garkida Nov. 18. 
It was a few days earlier than they needed 
to leave for their boat, but it was planned to 
attend a missions conference of Northern 
Nigeria at Miango, which is near Jos. The 
Beahms went along to attend the conference. 

We found about seventy missionaries at 
Miango. There were a number of home 
secretaries of some of the leading societies 
there as well. They were a real inspiration 
to the conference. Some of the things dis- 
cussed were Christian literature, native cus- 
toms which affect the Christian church, and 
the relation of missions to government. We 
believe there will be much help from this 
and like conferences. 

Personals — News of the 
Mission Family 

The Beahms were glad to get back to 
Garkida after seeing the furlough party off 
for America. Brother Heckman made a 
hurried trip to Gardemna the day the truck 
got back to Garkida. The next day Dr. 
Robertson started for Lassa to get his wife 
and Jane Vena who had been there nursing 
the sick. Sister Kulp and baby Philip came 
along back in the truck and Brother Kulp 
followed in a few days. 



Heckmans Meet Furlough Party 
and New Missionaries 

Brother and Sister Heckman left for Jos 
to meet Clara Harper and Sara Shisler re- 
turning from furlough, and Elnora Schechter 
and the Rupels. The Ford truck has been 
a great blessing during these two months. 
The hearts of the givers of such blessings 
would be made glad many times if they 
could know how it aids our work. 

Friends from Neighboring Mission 
Receive Medical Aid at Garkida 

Mr. and Mrs. Hansen of the neighboring 
Sudan United Mission came to Garkida in 
December to receive medical attention from 
our doctor. They incidently spent Christmas 
with us. 

Bible Society Secretary 
Visits Garkida Mission 

Mr. and Mrs. Banfield came to us Dec. 23. 
They came to Nigeria as missionaries about 
twenty-eight years ago. At present Mr. 
Banfield is secretary for W. Africa of the 
British and Foreign Bible Society. They 
brought cheerful messages to our Christians. 
He gave slide lectures on the Life of Christ 
and the Bible in West Africa. These added 
greatly to the usual cheer of the Christmas 
season. Brother Kulp brought us a message 
on Christmas morning. 

Anxiously Awaiting Arrival of 
Party from America 

We looked in vain throughout the last 
days of the year to see the Heckmans and 
party arrive. At such times as these we miss 
the daily mail, the telegraph and the tele- 
phone. 

"GOOD WILL TOWARD MEN" 

" To love and serve all men is to delight 
the eternal one." — Confucius. 

" Humanity is one. There are different 
races, but the higher a race the greater its 
duties." — Gandhi. 

" I know that all men everywhere are 
brothers and equals and that my true wel- 
fare is found in my unity with the whole 
world." — Tolstoi. 

" Give the children a true idea of war in 
their history books and the next generation 
would no more want a war than they would 
want an earthquake." — Israel Zangwill. 

" Is not the world wide enough to hold 
men whose natures are widely different? 
Those countless stars of the sky, do they 
fight for the mastery of the one?" — Tagore. 



118 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



OUR MOST DIFFICULT TASK IN CHINA 

(Continued from Page 102) 

The financial shortage and decrease in our 
budgets seem to be a handicap in all our 
work in China. There are many opportu- 
nities for evangelism if we had more money 
to secure Chinese preachers and workers. 
The financial situation has compelled us to 
work only the villages which we have been 
working in the past, or merely holding our 
ground without taking any backwater. We 
have not been able for the last few years 
to advance. At this time, when China is 
destroying some of her idols, it seems that 
the church ought to bend every effort to 
teach those who have been robbed of their 
object of worship. The financial shortage is 
holding us back but we are trying to make 
it a stepping stone towards China's indig- 
enous church. 

Our most difficult problem is, transmitting 
to the Chinese Christian the desire to tell 
others of his new found blessing. A number 
will testify to a great peace of conscience 
and exceeding joy in their new faith. 
Fathers will be very zealous in their church 
work, sacrificing in order to attend church 
and give of their scanty living to promote 
the church work, yet the children and wife 
may still have the faith of the people around 
them. Or, it may be vice versa. They do 
not feel the necessity of preaching Christ 



and him crucified to even their own rela- 
tives. For some reason we have not been 
able to create a zeal for the church as they 
have for nationalism. The Chinese farmers, 
as we have them in our territory, do not 
have much money and can not support the 
church very heavily financially, but outside 
of a few months during the year they have 
much spare time and if they had a zeal for 
talking their religion they would be able 
to carry a very extended church program. 
The Chinese church must be a church with 
a lay ministry, similar to our church in 
the States fifty years ago. And if we could 
get the enthusiasm and fervor into some of 
our Chinese brethren similar to some of 
our church workers in those pioneer days, 
the church in China would go forward 
regardless of the other handicaps mentioned. 
There is only one solution to this problem 
as I see it, that is the Spirit of Christ in 
the heart and life of everyone of his fol- 
lowers. The church in America and work- 
ers here on the field can pray for this 
filling. God is not limited. We who come 
to him properly can be heard. Will you 
pray for this, our most difficult problem 
in China ? In the words of our Master him- 
self, I would like to say to you, " The har- 
vest truly is plenteous but the laborers are 
few: pray ye therefore that the Lord of 
the harvest send forth [Chinese] laborers 
into his harvest." 



12 



Page 



Enlarging Your Missionary Horizon 

1. What per cent of mission workers are medical missionaries? Page 100. 

2. Does the Sarda Bill protect the womanhood of India? Page 101. 

3. According to Dr. Koo, what are the influences affecting Chinese student life? 
99. 

4. How have the Mexican school children recently expressed friendship for children of 
U. S.? Page 99. 

5. Missionaries in China face five difficult problems. Which is the most difficult? 
Page 102. 

6. What is stewardship? Would proper stewardship promote adequate support for 
evangelization of the world? Page 103. 

7. Why does the local church fail in mission support ? Page 104. 

8. How was Christmas observed in the Church of the Brethren in Sweden? Page 107. 

9. What are the advantages of the Duplex Envelope System? Page 109. 

10. How does the Church of the Brethren compare with other denominations in mis- 
sionary giving per capita? Page 111. 

11. What is the purpose of the Five Year Forward Movement in China? Page 112. 

What is the program of personal evangelism planned by the Bible School women in 
Liao Chou? Page 113. 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



119 



The editor invites helpful contributions for this department of the Visitor 



Suggestions for Organizing Women's 
Missionary Societies 



NORA M. RHODES 



PROMOTION 



ANY missionary minded woman may 
take the initiative in interesting the 
women of her congregation in or- 
ganizing a Woman's Missionary Society for 
the purpose of interesting them in the mis- 
sion work of the world. It will be advan- 
tageous for an interested group to meet and 
submit their plans to God before the first 
general meeting. Plans invigorated through 
prayer are different than when we trust to 
human powers alone. 

ORGANIZATION 

A Missionary Society interests old and 
young. Give all the women of the church 
an invitation to attend the first meeting and 
to become members. The meeting and its 
purpose should have plenty of publicity. A 
suggestive constitution will be found in the 
January, 1930, Missionary Visitor. Select the 
officers and set a definite time for the 
monthly meetings. The program committee 
may consist of the officers of the society. 
It is well to make out the year's program in 
advance. Assign the devotions and lessons 
to different women in order that as many 
of the members as possible may appear on 
the program sometime during the year. 
Since all text books and program helps are 
available in the early fall, it is recommended 
that the societies begin their new year in 
October 

PROGRAM MATERIAL 

Each year new mission texts for use in 
women's groups are issued at a very reason- 
able price. Best results will be had by a 
number of women buying their own texts. 



(In this way a missionary library will be 
built up.) The devotional and chapter helps 
based on these texts are usually found 
monthly in the Missionary Visitor, generally 
beginning with the September number. It 
is contemplated that complete outlines on 
the texts will be prepared and may be had 
in advance by writing to the General Mis- 
sion Board. Interesting and instructive les- 
sons may also be given on various phases of 
our denominational work in India, China and 
Africa. Missionary news items by the mem- 
bers at each meeting add interest. The 
Missionary Society should be the means of 
enriching the prayer life of every earnest 
Christian woman. It will be found helpful 
if each woman will take the name of a mis- 
sionary to remember daily at the throne of 
grace. 

FINANCE 

The mite-box is recommended as a method 
of giving into the- Lord's treasury. Some 
societies have yearly membership dues. The 
amount is optional with the local society. 
Many enjoy a social period at the close of 
the lesson when a light lunch is served and 
each one contributes ten cents. These com- 
bined contributions give a society quite a 
sum for missionary purposes. 

The above are merely suggestions and 
should be adapted to suit local conditions. 

Any group of women, no matter how few 
in number, with an interest in the " first 
great work of the church " and time given 
for well-prepared programs, may have a 
fruitful society. May God bless the efforts 
of every Woman's Missionary Society. 



120 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR WOMEN'S 
MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 

Based on " From Jerusalem to Jerusalem "* 

The Winning of Europe, Chapter 3 

" Ours the task sublime, 
To build eternity in time." 

—Edwin Markham. 
Devotions 

Hymn : " Fling Out the Banner " 
Scripture : Lydia the First Convert from 

Europe, Acts 16: 9-15. 
Prayer : For fellowship through the Gospel 

among people of every race. 

Chapter Outline 

1. Condition of the World When Jesus 
Came, pp. 81. 

2. Map Study. Let the leader with the aid 
of the map show how Eastern Europe 
was evangelized from Constantinople 
and Western Europe was evangelized 
from Rome. 

3. Missionaries of the Eastern Church 
(Greek), pp. 83-89. Let six women tell 
briefly about the following : Ulfilas, 
Severius, Cyril, Methodius, Olga, Vladi- 
mir. 

4. Missionaries of the Western Church 
(Roman), pp. 90-105. The various coun- 
tries may be represented by women who 
tell briefly of the missionaries and mis- 
sion work done in their own countries. 
Much interest will be added if the 
women can appear in the native costume 
of their country. Various flags may be 
displayed. Leader introduces each coun- 
try. For instance, " We have with us 
an assembly of the nations and we have 
asked each nation to tell us about when 
or by whom her people were won to 
Christianity. I summon France, eldest 
daughter of the church, to tell us the 
story of her conversion." 

France, pp. 90-91, emphasizing the part 

played by Clotilda. 
England, pp. 92-97, tells of Monk Aug- 
ustine. 
Ireland, Holland, Germany, Scandinavia, 
emphasizing the work of women, pp. 
98-105. 
Exercise by two women. Questions and 
answers, first two stanzas, page 11. 



Order from Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, 111. 
Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 50 cents. 



Hymn of St. Patrick in unison: 

Christ with me, Christ before me, 
Christ behind me, Christ within me, 
Christ beneath me, Christ above me, 
Christ at my right, Christ at my left, 
Christ in breadth, Christ in length, Christ 

in height. 
Christ in the heart of every man who 

thinks of me, 
Christ in the mouth of every man who 

speaks to me. 
Christ in the eye of every man who sees 

me, 
Christ in the ear of every man that hears 

me. 

WOMEN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY AND 
THE CHURCH PROGRAM 

One Missionary Society is planning a 
special Sunday-school missionary service for 
the first Sunday of each month, with a 
special program each quarter. They tried 
the plan last year with success and hope 
to do even better this year. One member 
of the missionary committee writes : " Please 
send me Missiongrams and other helps on 
missionary work." 

You might be interested in a part of the 
answer to the above request : " We have 
placed your name on the Missiongram mail- 
ing list ; also we are sending some program 
material and the catalogues of missionary 
literature. In the catalogue which lists our 
denominational literature, you will find a 
list of plays on pages 5 and 6, also a list 
of books with helpful program material, page 
6. If you have not used the slide sets, ' The 
Missionary Character of Christianity,' and 
' Our Mountain Work,' you will find them 
worth while. We have a new song slide set, 
' Where Cross the Crowded Ways of Life,' 
which is not listed in the catalogue." 

HIS BOOK 

A Play for Juniors or Intermediates 

His Book, by Elizabeth Edland, is a simple 
one-act play of great power. Shows the 
effect of the gift of the Bible on a Mexican 
boy. Six speaking parts ; possibility of using 
additional children in the scene. The true 
story out of which grew this dramatization 
is so interesting that it is printed by way 
of introduction. About twenty minutes. 
Price ten cents. Order from Brethren Pub- 
lishing House, Elgin, 111. 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



121 



HANDWORK MATERIAL FOR JUNIOR 
GROUPS 

Mexicans in the United States Picture 
Sheet. A twelve-page folder of pictures for 
notebooks, posters or class work. Paper, 
25 cents. 

Philippine Picture Sheet. Consists of 
twelve-page folder of interesting pictures of 
life in the Philippines. Useful for notebook 
work, posters, and lesson illustrations. 
Paper, 25 cents. 

Picture Map of the Philippines. A deco- 
rated map in bold outline with a separate 
page of pictures to be cut out, colored and 
pasted on the. map at proper places. Very 
popular. Paper, 50 cents. 

MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

(These are preliminary figures at time of going to 
press before the final closing of books) 

Conference Offering, 1929. As of February 28, 1930, 
the Conference (budget) offering for the year ending 
February 28, 1930, stands as follows: 
Cash received since March 1, 1929, $361,079.50 

(The 1929 budget of $363,000.00 is 99.5% raised, 
whereas it should be 100%.) 

Mission Board Treasury Statement. The following 
shows the condition of mission finances on February 
28, 1930: 

Income since March 1, 1929, $408,951.24 

Income same period last year 298,023.04 

Expense since March 1, 1929, 274,655.43 

Expense same period last year, 300,989.87 

Mission surplus February 28, 1930, 33,924.34 

Mission deficit January 31, 1930, 43,615.72 

Decrease in deficit and increase in surplus, 

February, 1930, 77,540.06 

February Receipts. Contributions were received 
during February by funds as follows: 

Receipts since 3-1-29 
Total Rec'd 

World-Wide Missions $43,406.07 $111,423.12 

Student Fellowship Fund 1928-1929 601.83 3,580.93 

Student Fellowship Fund 1929-1930 723.80 723.80 

Aid Societies Mission Fund— 1927 1,742.10 5,475.96 

Home Missions 925.89 13,384.69 

Greene County, Virginia, Mission 71.90 407.67 

Foreign Missions 1,017.67 5,334.83 

Junior League— 1928 30.00 619.47 

Junior League— 1929 1,059.24 5,731.97 

Junior League— 1930 50.00 96.30 

B. Y. P. D.— 1929 828.42 3,100.92 

Challenge Fund 11,042.58 17,592.58 

Women's Deficit Fund 6,616.39 11,391.72 

India Mission 611.98 2,806.56 

India Native Worker 60.00 550.25 

India Boarding School 130.16 1,274.13 

India Share Plan 1,099.80 5,166.26 

India Missionary Supports 8,713.80 30,927.69 

Vyara Church Building Fund ... 247.00 4,186.89 

China Mission 161.00 2,493.51 

China Native Worker 100.00 344.93 

China Girls' School 25.00 51.03 

China Share Plan 687.50 2,334.03 

China Missionary Supports 5,686.25 16,964.78 

Sweden Missionary Supports 1,054.17 2,154.17 

Africa Missionary Supports 4,109.55 11,459.86 

Africa Mission 5,383.76 11,183.14 

Africa Share Plan 331.25 1,444.36 

Near East Relief 18.05 579.44 

Flood Relief 56.50 148.50 

China Famine Relief 2,187.37 3,452.70 

Conference Budget Donations .... 9,351.58 84,752.14 

Conference Budget Designated ... 140.00 525.68 



MEXICAN ART EXHIBITS READY 
FOR DISPLAY 

Any church group or community inter- 
ested in securing the exhibit of Mexican art 
work may do so by writing to the Com- 
mittee on World Friendship Among Chil- 
dren, 289 Fourth Avenue, New York, and 
assuming the expense of shipping it to the 
next stopping place. Details concerning the 
exhibit are given on page 99. 

EASTER 

I crave your pardon, that I did not know — 

But for you told me so, 

Being a stranger here — 

This festival you celebrate each year 

I took to be a sort of dress parade, 

And fashion promenade — 

The matter of a hat, and gloves, and gown ; 

But for your telling me, I had not known 

It had to do with linen grave-clothes laid 

From the awakened Dead ; 

And with a napkin, folded by itself, 

From the aroused Head. 

— Gertrude McGregor Moffatt. 

A BALLAD OF TREES AND THE 
MASTER 

Into the woods my Master went, 

Clean forspent, forspent. 

Into the woods my Master came, 

Forspent with love and shame. 

But the olives they were not blind to him, 

The thorn tree had a mind to him 

When into the woods he came. 

Out of the woods my Master went, 

And he was well content. 

Out of the woods my Master came, 

Content with love and shame. 

When Death and Shame would woo him 

last: 
'Twas on a tree they slew him — last 
When out of the woods he came. 

■ — Sidney Lanier. 

EXTERIORS 

I've longed for cake and eaten bread ; 
I've worn brown slippers, wanting red ; 
I walk sedately down the street, 
My heart runs on the sun to greet ; 
And no one knows and no one cares 
What gorgeous colors my soul wears. 

I look at every plain, drab being 
And wonder what his. soul is seeing; 
If I, who seem so slow and staid, 
Can be inside a gypsy maid, 
Then what might not those others be 
Who look so dry and dull to me ! 

— Anne Abbot Dover. 



122 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 




" No feet are more swift and beautiful in carrying the gospel of 
peace and glad tidings of good things than those of the missionary 
child." 



Since the Junior Missionary Project this year 
is the support of children of missionaries, pic- 
tures of the children will appear each month 
in this department. The pictures may be used 
for posters. 



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Lorita and Gordon Shull 

Lorita Irene Shull was born at Bulsar, Nov. 5, 1922. 
She is 47y 2 inches tall, weighs 50 lbs., has brown 
eyes and brown curly hair. Her playmates are the 
children who attend the Bible school. They build 
bungalows and do landscape gardening in the sand 
pile, and play on the teeter-totter, bars and swings. 
They will play house with her when she will play 
Indian house, but when she wants to play house 
like American girls she either plays alone or with 
her brother. During the last three or four months 
she has been interested in working out programs. 
When she discovered that her parents were not avail- 
able for an audience just any time, she said, " I will 
have my programs in Marathi and invite the Indian 
children. They will come." So she made her plans. 
She even agreed to bring the smallest ones herself, 
going after them with a lantern. She gathers flowers 
for decorations, spreads rugs on the ground, rings a 
bell for them to come and the program is on. 

Gordon Lichty Shull was born at Bulsar May 17, 
1925. He has brown eyes and medium light brown 
hair. Sometimes his days are spent by playing 
" father " to his dolls and teddy bear, and a very 
attentive father he makes. Again he will spend days 



as a railroad man or motor driver. For diversion he 
will go hunting and will find a deer hiding in the 
plants. The game is brought and the family feast on 
venison for two or three meals. In the meantime he 
is obsessed with the urge to measure things. With 
one object or one person as a standard ne determines 
whether other things are larger or smaller. He is 
41 inches high and weighs 37 J / 2 lbs. His favorite food 
is rice and curry — not too hot, if you please. 

Jasper Garner was born at Bulsar, Nov. 7, 1921. On 
his eighth birthday he had a tea-party for a number 
of his Indian playmates. He is 47 inches in heighth 
and now weighs 56 lbs. Cookies is his favorite food. 
He is especially interested in tools and machinery, 
such as automobiles, engines, and planes. Hunting 
tiger is a game frequently played. He has dark 
hair and dark eyes. His full name is Jasper Henry 
Barkdoll Garner. 

Warren Kenneth Garner was born at Dahanu, June 
27, 1926, and consequently is now more than half-past 
three. He has dark eyes and light hair. His weight 
is 36 lbs. and heighth 38^4 inches. His playmates are 
Patros (Peter), Shunker, Pretu (Love), Jewanrao, 
Shshela Gopal, and others, all of which are Indian. 
They usually play some horse game or hunt tigers 
as the older ones do. When asked what he likes best 
to eat, he says, " Cornflakes." 



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Jasper and Warren Garner 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



123 



Prize Stories of the Missionary Picture 
Story Contest 



Note: Prizes for the best six stories for the Mis- 
sionary Picture Story Contest were awarded to the 
following : 

Virginia Stoner, age 10, New Lebanon, Ohio 

Barbara Anna Roller, age 12, New Market, Va. 

Frances K. Deardorff, age 13, Lanark, 111. 

Vernon Gearhart, age 12, McVeytown, Pa. 

Ira Myers, age 11, Lindsay, Calif. 

Dortha Marie Boyer, age 9, North Manchester, Ind. 

Three of the prize stories are printed below. _ The 
other three appear in Our Boys and Girls, April 5. 



OUR AFRICAN BROTHERS 

Barbara Anna Roller 

Age 12 

We came across the desert to Garkida. 
What an interesting trip we have had going 
over the ocean, and when we met the mis- 
sionaries and saw the African people it was 
much more interesting. 

After finding the missionaries we started 
to a mission school for our African brothers 
which was a small distance out in the 
country. First we met some boys who 
seemed to be grinding something with long 
handles which were crooked at the end. I 
wondered what this was and upon coming 
closer I found it to be a kind of corn. 

A little further on was a woman with a 
baby strapped to her back and carrying a 
large basket of the corn away. The fat, 
little face of the baby sticking out of the 
funny carriage made us smile and try to 
talk to the baby, who only turned its head 
and the queer carriage went on. 

There was an African boy there who had 
a queer, little animal which did lots of 
tricks. Bro. Paul Rupel told us that it was 
a kind of monkey which the boy had found 
out in the forest, and tamed. We enjoyed 
watching the animal do some stunts. 

In the distance was the mission school. 
There were but few openings except the 
door, but the thatched roofs let in a great 
deal of light. Just to the side of this hut 
was a group of black boys listening to an- 
other white man whom we soon got ac- 
quainted with. The boys in their clean 
suits and happy faces were gladly taking 
orders for physical exercise. 

Next we came to the schoolhouse. It was 
so interesting to see the few things that 
furnished it. Before we came back home I 
think we appreciated the many blessings we 



have while those black people who are now 
being helped do not have them to enjoy. 

As I thought of home while in Africa, I 
could plainly see in my imagination the 
whole family working hard gathering in 
potatoes and other crops to help our Black 
Brothers in Africa. 

New Market, Va. 

NORMA VISITS GARKIDA 

Virginia Stoner 

Age 10 

One day Norma and Norman were play- 
ing, when their mother said, " Come, chil- 
dren, we are going to make a garden for 
the African Brothers. Norman spaded a little 
patch of ground, while Norma pulled weeds 
with all her might. Soon they were ready 
to plant. They planted beans, potatoes, corn, 
tomatoes, and other vegetables. Each day 
they worked steadily. Soon they saw small 
sprouts from the plants. Every day they 
worked in the garden ; corn had ears on, 
cabbage had small heads on, and tomatoes 
were green. 

One day Mrs. Blake said, " Get some 
baskets and sacks." They were busy gath- 
ering vegetables. 

Norman said, " I am going to make a sign 
and sell some vegetables." The sign read, 
"Vegetables for Sale." There was enough 
traffic passed their home for good sale. 
Quite a few people bought. In two weeks 
the twins had one dollar apiece. At the end 
of the season they had $4.35 each. The 
twins said, " We are going to give our money 
to the African Brothers." 

That Sunday the twins put their money 
in the offering. The same night the twins 
went to sleep quickly. 

The next morning when Mrs. Blake called 
the twins, Norma said, " Oh, Mother, I didn't 
want to get up. I had the best dream. Do 
you want to hear it?" "Yes," was the 
reply. " I dreamed about Africa. Their 
queer looking houses were made of mud with 
a grass roof. There were palm trees by 
their home. A missionary took me to a 
home where an African mother was getting 



124 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



supper. Tney ground the corn for mush. 
The soup was made of beans and leaves. 
They put the mush and soup in gourds. 

" Next I saw some women hoeing corn 
with odd looking hoes. The missionary was 
going to take me to the missionary home 
when mother called us." 

Norman said, " I wish I could dream like 
that." 

New Lebanon, Ohio. 

MY FIRST TRIP TO A STRANGE 
COUNTRY 
Dortha Marie Boyer 
Age 9 

My parents told me one day that we 
would take a long trip to a strange land 
where our African brothers live. We packed 
our trunks and boarded a large steamer, 
which was to be our home for some time. 
After traveling many, many miles, we landed 
in Africa. Brother and Sister Helser and 
Sister Clara Harper were waiting to meet 



us. They took us many more miles in their 
Ford truck over rough, country roads to 
their home. Their home is on the mission 
compound of the Brethren Church at Gar- 
kida, Africa. It was a three days' journey 
and every thing we saw seemed strange. 
The missionaries live in little huts with grass 
roofs, just like the natives have. 

They have a school on the compound and 
a hospital which the American boys and 
girls helped to build. Do you see in the 
picture how hard the American boys and 
girls are working, raising and selling vege- 
tables to earn money to send to help their 
African friends? 

The long building is the Boys' School and 
the boys are out learning to make tools 
and many other useful articles which will 
make their work lighter. Others are study- 
ing lessons. They are so grateful for the 
missionaries' work and for the help that 
comes from America. While the missionary 
teachers are teaching them their school 

(Continued on Page 126) 



Missionary Worship Program for Juniors 

To be used in presenting the Junior Missionary Project 



RUTH SHRIVER 



Note: The Junior Missionary Project for 1930 is the 
support of missionaries' children. Explanation of the 
project, also a list of the children under thirteen 
years of age, appeared in the March Missionary 
Visitor. For further information write to General 
Mission Board, Elgin, 111. 

Quiet Music 
Call to Worship : 
Leader: Who shall ascend unto the hill of 
the Lord and who shall stand in his 
holy place? 
Children : He that hath clean hands and a 
pure heart ; who hath not lifted up his 
soul unto falsehood and who hath not 
sworn deceitfully. 
Hymn : " I Would Be True " 
Unison Prayer : 

O God, our Father, give me clean hands, 

clean words, and clean thoughts ; 
Help me to stand for the hard right against 

the easy wrong; 
Save me from habits that harm; 
Teach me to work as hard and play as 
fair in thy sight alone as if all the world 
saw ; 



Director of Children's Work, Church of the Brethren. 



Forgive me when I am unkind ; and help 
me to forgive others who are unkind to 
me; 
Keep me ready to help others at some cost 

to myself ; 
Send me chances to do a little good every 
day, and to grow more like Christ. 
Amen. 
Suggestive Hymns : " We've a Story to Tell 
to the Nations " 
"Fling Out the Banner" 
Scripture : Matt. 25 : 34-36 
Story: " Nanu Comes to the Mission School" 

Brief talk by the leader calling attention to 
the Missionary Project. (See- March Mis- 
sionary Visitor. If you have not ordered 
your materials write to General Mission 
Board at once.) 

Offering Service : Have two juniors lift the 
offering. 

Offering Prayer: (Hymn, "Take My Life 
and Let It Be," 1st stanza) 



April 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



125 



Nanu Comes to the Mission School 

A True Story 

MARY D. BLICKENSTAFF* 



NANU sat in front of his father's house 
playing happily with some bits of 
broken water jars, sticks and pebbles. 
The sunshine felt good to his thin body. 
Although it was the Indian winter season 
Nanu was arrayed in only his sunny smile, 
a nondescript rag about his hips and brass 
rings in his ears. Nanu's grandmother dozed 
in the sunshine beside the door of the 
wretched mud hut which housed not only 
Nanu and his father and mother, but his 
paternal grandparents and an uncle and aunt 
as well. From the inside came the sound 
of his mother's low singing, blended with 
the whirl of the mill as she ground the daily 
supply of grain for the family's bread. 

The sound ceased, and the mother ap- 
peared in the doorway. " Nanu," she called, 
" Go to the jungle and tell thy father that 
the head man of the village is calling him 
to work on the road this afternoon." " May 
I stay until my father comes home at noon?" 
" Yes, child, and be sure to take the right 
turn in the path as thou goest." 

Nanu hurried away. He loved being in 
the jungle with his father and he loved the 
sound of the axe as he watched the big chips 
fly when his father was cutting down a tree. 
Nanu took the turn to the right and guided 
by the sound of chopping, soon found his 
father and delivered his message. Then he 
perched himself astride a near-by log while 
the chopping continued. Presently, tiring of 
this he ran about collecting chips that hap- 
pened to meet his fancy. Seeing a nice 
smooth one near his father he darted to 
get it just as a sharp splinter flew from the 
axe. The father shouted, but it was too 
late, for the wood hit Nanu in the face, and 
made a deep cut across his cheek. Nanu 
was as much frightened as hurt, and cried 
most lustily. His father quickly picked him 
up and carried him home to his mother. 
When she saw the little boy with his face 
covered with blood, she too was frightened. 
She plastered some mud over the wound and 
it stopped bleeding. 

That evening the mother was careful to 



Missionary to India. 



go to the little stone idol painted red, set 
up under some trees at the edge of the vil- 
lage, taking with her a handful of rice and 
some pieces of cocoanut. She placed these 
on the ground in front of the idol as an 
offering to the god who she thought lived 
there, that her little Nanu's face might be 
quickly healed. " O, if only I had a chicken 
or a goat to bring, then the god would be 
more pleased," she thought as she bowed 
again and again before the lifeless stone. 

She had never heard of the true God who 
is always ready to help those who come to 
him in time of need. 

Nanu was now quite content to play about 
the house and to help his mother with small 
tasks. The wound on his face was a long 
time healing, and many were the visits made 
to the little red god. At last when Nanu 
was well again, the mother did not forget 
to go with her thank offering and prostrate 
herself again and again before the unseeing, 
unknowing idol. 

One day there was an accident in the 
jungle. Nanu's father was crushed under a 
falling tree. Other workers carried him 
home. There all the relatives gathered about 
him wailing and crying, but nothing could 
arouse the poor man. His life had gone. 
Nanu scarcely understood what had hap- 
pened and he was terrified by all the noise 
that was going on. 

After that his mother was always very 
sad. All the pretty beads and bangles that 
she had worn were taken away from her 
and she had to work so much harder than 
before. No one was kind to her. All the 
aunts and uncles, and the grandparents too, 
said that she had done some great sin either 
in this life or a preceding one. Now the 
gods were angry with her and that was why 
her husband had died. 

From overwork and cruel treatment Nanu's 
mother became ill, and no one wanted to 
take care of her. Nanu helped her all he 
could, but he was little more than a baby. 

Finally all of the relatives said, " If you 
are going to be sick and can't work, get out 
of here. There isn't enough food anyway." 
Without the meager earnings of Nanu's 



126 



The Missionary Visitor 



April 
1930 



father, the food had been scarce indeed, and 
Nanu, like so many other children of India, 
had grown stoically accustomed to the pangs 
of hunger. 

It was then that they heard about a hos- 
pital in a city many miles away where there 
were queer foreign doctors who were kind 
and did wonderful things for poor sick peo- 
ple. The mother resolved to go there if 
possible. There was no way to go except 
to walk, so taking Nanu by the hand she 
set out early one morning. 

Nanu had no trouble in keeping up with 
his mother for she was too tired and too 
sick to walk fast. They had nothing to eat 
all day except a handful or two of parched 
grain. Night came and they lay down to- 
gether under a tree. Nanu snuggled close 
to his mother to keep warm and he slept, 
but she only moaned and shivered through 
the long dreary hours until dawn. 

They continued on their weary way. Nanu 
was hungry, but he did not complain. He 
was used to that. They had to stop more 
often to rest as the sun climbed higher and 
passed the meridian. After a long rest the 
woman tried to rise, but sank back gasping, 
" I can go no farther. O, my poor little 
Nanu I" She lay back on the dry hard earth 
and closed her eyes. At first Nanu did not 
notice but when he came running to her 
with a bright pebble she neither spoke nor 
moved. " Look, mother, what a pretty stone ! 
Don't go to sleep." She had always re- 
sponded to his call before. " Mother, mother, 
wake up," he cried, but there was no answer. 
Her voice was stilled forever, but Nanu did 
not understand. He only knew that she 
was strangely quiet, and he raised his voice 
in a loud wail. 

Just beyond was a cluster of huts by the 
roadside. Hearing the cry of a strange child 
the people came out to see what was wrong. 
They understood at once but no one dared to 
risk defiling himself by touching either the 
dead or this child of low caste. They looked 
on helplessly until one said, " Let's go to the 
Christians who live there by the little school 
house. They'll know what to do." So some- 
one ran off to call them. The Indian Chris- 
tian in charge of the school came with his 
wife. They had no fear of defilement. The 
good motherly woman, taking Nanu by the 
hand, spoke soothing words and led him still 
sobbing to her home. There she washed the 



dirty little hands and face and put food 
before him. In his surprise at seeing so 
much food all at once, he immediately forgot 
to cry and began to fill his empty, little 
stomach. 

Many efforts were made to find out from 
where Nanu had come, but without success. 
Since the kind Indian woman who fed and 
comforted him had a large family of her 
own, she could not keep the little fellow. 
But she knew that the Mission would care 
for him, so she took him to the missionary 
who had charge of the boys' boarding school. 
The missionary listened to all that was 
known of his story, and placed Nanu in 
charge of the house father of the school, 
instructing him to bathe the boy, give him 
clean clothes and make him as happy as 
possible. 

It all seemed very strange to Nanu at first, 
and of course he was often lonesome for his 
mother. But he soon began to play with the 
other boys and to feel that this school was 
his home. There were so many interesting 
things to learn in the kindergarten class. 
He was learning too, about a wonderful 
kind God, so different from the god of the 
little red stone. 

All this happened several years ago, and 
Nanu is still in the boarding school. He 
knows no other home than this and he has 
forgotten that he ever worshiped an idol 
god. It is the hope of the Mission that 
he may grow up to be a worker for the 
true God whom he has learned to love and 
serve. 

MY FIRST TRIP TO A STRANGE 
COUNTRY 

(Continued from Page 124) 

studies, they are also telling them about 
Jesus and teaching them the right way. 
Aren't you glad we can help them by send- 
ing our gifts of money? Did you notice 
how happy the boys in the picture seem? 
I wonder if they might be singing, "Jesus 
Loves Me"? Aren't we glad that Jesus 
loves the African boys and girls just as 
much as he loves us? I want to work 
harder to earn more money to send to them, 
don't you? 

North Manchester, Ind. 



Church of the Brethren Missionaries 

Supported in Whole or in Part by Funds Administered by the General Mission Board 
With the Year They Entered Service 



AMERICA 

Church of the Brethren In- 
dustrial School, Geer, Va. 

Bollinger, Amsey, and Flor- 
ence, 1922 

Finckh, Elsie, 1925 

Hersch, Orville, and Mabel, 
1925 

Kline, Alvin, and Edna, 1919 

Knight, Henry, March, Va., 
1928 

Wampler, Nelie, 1922 

In Pastoral Service 

Bowman, Price, and Elsie, 
Bassett, Va., 1925 

Eby, E. H., and Emma, 2923 
St. Joseph Ave., St. Jo- 
seph, Mo., 1927 

Weiss, Lorell, 1188 Missouri 
Ave., Portland, Ore., 1927 

Haney, R. A., and Irva, 
Lonaconing, Md., 1925 

Rohrer, Ferdie, and Pearl, 
Jefferson, N. C, 1927 

Ziegler, Edward, and Ilda, 
405 E. Eleventh Ave., John- 
son City, Tenn., 1923 

Barr, Francis, and Cora, Al- 
bany, Ore., 1928 

In Evangelistic Service 

Smith, Rev., and Mrs. S. Z., 
Sidney, Ohio 

SWEDEN 

Graybill, J. F., and Alice, 

Bergsgatan 45, M a 1 m 6, 

Sweden, 1911 
Norris, Glen M., and Lois, 

Spangatan, 3 8, M a 1 m 6, 

Sweden, 1929 

On Furlough 

Buckingham, Ida, Oakley, 
111., 1913 

CHINA 
Liao Chow, Shansi, China 

Hutchison, Anna, 1911 
Oberholtzer, I. E., and 

Elizabeth, 1916 
Pollock, Myrtle, 1917 
Senger, Nettie M., 1916 
Shock, Laura J., 1916 
Ulery, Ruth F., 1926 
Wampler, Ernest M., 1918, 

and Elizabeth, 1922 

Ping Ting Chow, Shansi, China 

Bright, J. Homer, and Min- 
nie, 1911 
Crumpacker, F. H., and Anna, 

1908 
Flory, Byron M., and Nora, 

1917 
Flory, Edna R., 1917 
Horning, Emma, 1908 
Metzger, Minerva, 1910 
Schaeffer, Mary, 1917 
Sollenberger, O. C, and 
Hazel, 1919 



Chow Yang, Shansi, China 

Clapper. V. Grace, 1917 

Cripe, Winnie, 1911 

Heisey, Walter J., and Sue, 
1917 

Neher, Minneva J., 1924 

Smith, W. Harlan, and Fran- 
ces, 1919 

Tai Yuan Fu, care of Y. M. 
C. A., Shansi, China 

Ikenberry, E. L., and Olivia, 

1922 
Myers, Minor M., and Sara, 

1919 

On Furlough 

* Brubaker, L. S., and Marie. 
331 S. 3d. Covina, Calif., 1924 



AFRICA 

Garkida, Nigeria, West Africa, 
via Jos 

Beahm, Wm. M., and Esther, 

1924 
Harper, Clara, 1926 
Heckman, Clarence C, and 

Lucile, 1924 
Robertson, Dr. Russell L., 

and Bertha C, 1927 
Rupel. Paul, and Naomi, 1929 
Schechter, Elnora, 1929 
Shisler, Sara, 1926 

Lassa, via Maiduguri, Nigeria, 
West Africa 

Kulp, H. Stover, 1922, and 
Christina, 1927 

On Furlough 

* Burke, Dr. Homer L., and 
Marguerite, 6317 Grand 
Ave., Chicago, 111., 1923 

Gibbel, Dr. J. Paul, and 
Verda, Girard, 111., 1926 

Helser, Albert D., 1922, and 
Lola, Thornville, Ohio, 1923 



INDIA 

Ahwa, Dangs, Surat Dist., 
India 

Garner, H. P., and Kathryn, 

1916 
Royer, B. Mary, 1913 

Anklesvar, Broach Dist., India 

Grisso, Lillian, 1917 

Lichty, D. J., 1902, and Anna 

1912 
Miller, Sadie J., 1903 

Bulsar, Surat Dist., India 

Blickenstaff. Lynn A., and 

Mary, 1920 
Blough, J. M., and Anna, 

1903 



Cottrell, Dr. A. R., and 

Laura, 1913 
Fox. Dr. J. W., and Besse, 

1929 
Mohler. Jennie, 1916 
Shumaker, Ida C, 1910 

Dahanu Road, Thana Dist., 
India 

Blickenstaff, Verna M., 1919 
Ebbert, Ella, 1917 
Metzger, Dr. Ida, 1925 
Swartz, Goldie E., 1916 

Jalalpor, Surat Dist., India 

Miller, Eliza B., 1900 

Vada, Thana Dist., India 

■Rrumbaueh. Anna R.. 1919 
Fbev, Adam, and Alice. 1900 
Sbnll. Chalmer, and Mary, 
1919 

Palghar, Thana Dist., India 

Alley, Howard L., and Hat- 
tie, 1917 

Po«t Umalla, via Anklesvar, 
India 

Miller. Arthur S. B., and 

Tennie. 1919 
Widdowson. Olive, 1912 
Ziegler, Kathryn, 1908 

Vyara. via Surat, India 

Brooks, Harlan J., and Ruth, 

1924 
Wagoner, J. E., and Ellen, 
1919 
Mow, Anetta, 1917 

Bu*-jor Bag, Lunsikui, Nav- 
sari, India 

Mow. Baxter M., and Anna, 
1923 

Woodstock School. Landour 
Mussoorie, U. P., India 

Stoner, Susan L., 1927 

On Furlough 

Kaylor, John I., 1911, and 

Ina. 1515 Second St., Bak- 

ersfield. Calif.. 1921 
Long, I. S.. and Effie. Bridge- 
water, Va., 1903 
Moomaw, I. W.. and Mabel, 

R. 3, Canton, Ohio. 1923 
Nickey, Dr. Barbara M.. 

3435 Van Buren St., ChT- 

cago, 111., 1915 
Roop, Ethel, 1926 
Shickel, Elsie N., 2211 Orange 

Ave. N. W., Roanoke, Va., 

1921 
Wolf, L. Mae, 3435 Van 

Buren St., Chicago, 111., 1922 
Woods, B e u 1 a h, Spencer, 

Ohio, 1924 



Otherwise employed in America until conditions permit return to the field. 



Please Nbtice. — Postage on letters to our missionaries is 5c for each ounce or fraction 
thereof and 3c for each additional ounce or fraction. 



Missions and Church Promotion 

March 1, 1930— February 28, 1931 

Conference Budget 

General Mission Board $275,500 

Board of Religious Education 21 ,500 

General Ministerial Board 8,500 

General Education Board 5,000 

American Bible Society 500 



Total $311,000 

Send remittances to General Mission Board, Elgin, 111. 



Execute Your Own Will 



You do this when you get one of our annuity bonds. It will mean a big 
saving to the Lord's treasury in court costs, and lawyers' and administrators' fees. 

But, if You Make a Will- 

Get good legal help that your will may be properly made. To remember 
missions in your will the following form of bequest is recommended: 

" I give and bequeath to the General Mission Board of the Church of the Brethren, 
a corporation of the State of Illinois', with its principal office at Elgin, Kane County, 

Illinois, its successors and assigns, forever, the sum of dollars' 

($ ) to be used for the purpose of the said Board as specified in 

its charter." 

Write for our booklet which tells about annuity bonds and wills 

General Mission. Board 
I Or THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN ^ 

* INCORPORATED *^ 

£lgii\..Illir\oi5 



THE 

MISSIONARY 



Visitor 




Church of the Dfethren 



Vol. XXXII 



MAY, 1930 



No. 5 



PENTECOST means power — power to forgive in- 
juries, to keep an unsoured spirit amid the deepest in- 
justices, to overcome evil with good, hate by love and the 
world by a cross. 

PENTECOST confronts us with the issue of a 
thornbush, a cross, a self-giving. We reluctantly take 
it, and lo, we find that we have found not a cross — not a 
fading Christ, but a Christ of eternal freshness. 

Selected from "The Christ of Every Road" 
By E. Stanley Jones 




130 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



Mission Board Meeting 



THE General Mission Board met 
April 9 in a three day session to 
transact business for the mission in- 
terests as well as the Publishing House. The 
April meeting is the heaviest one of the 
four held during the year. All of the- budg- 
ets from the various fields are presented at 
this time so the Board can consider the 
whole range of need and make decisions in 
the light of the resources expected from the 
congregations. 

More missionaries than usual were present, 
namely, Brother and Sister A. D. Helser and 
daughter Esther May, Mrs. Homer F. Burke, 
and Dr. Paul Gibbel from Africa; Brother 
and Sister John I. Kaylor, Dr. Barbara 
Nickey, Beulah Woods, and Mae Wolf from 
India; and Dr. D. L. Horning, returned mis- 
sionary from China. 

Final authorization was made for Dr. and 
Mrs. Burke to return to Africa this year. 

Requests from the fields call for new 
workers this year as follows : From India, 
one man trained for educational work, one 
lady with training in elementary education, 
two nurses and one man for educational work 
in the Marathi language area; for Africa, 
two nurses (one for leper colony), one build- 
er and wife, one doctor and wife, one or- 
dained minister and wife; for Denmark, one 
man and wife. The Board approved of these 
calls, subject to sufficient funds to grant the 
workers and finding suitable applicants. Five 
new workers were tentatively appointed to 
go to Africa this year. Their names will be 
announced after final examinations and other 
investigations are completed. 

The Board passed a motion, asking its 
secretary, Brother Bonsack, to write a letter 
to the secretary of the India mission, Brother 
Blickenstafr, expressing appreciation for the 
movement of the India churches in assuming 
an increased financial and personal responsi- 
bility for their evangelistic work. This move- 
ment for the India church to become in- 
digenous is very gratifying to the home 
Board. 

Furloughs for India workers for 1931 were 
granted as follows : B. M. Mow and wife, 
Kathryn Ziegler, Jennie Mohler, Eliza B. 
Miller and Anetta Mow. 

The report on ministerial and missionary 



relief prepared jointly by a committee, with 
representatives from the General Ministerial 
and General Mission Boards, was approved. 
Very likely this committee will present this 
report to Conference for further action. 
They are looking toward a more adequate 
ministerial and missionary relief system. 

The Board elected Edward Frantz to con- 
tinue for another three-year term as a mem- 
ber of the Gish Fund Committee. The other 
members are J. E. Miller and J. W. Lear. 
This committee selects the books which are 
placed on the Gish fund list, available to 
ministers in our church at reduced rates. 

A vote of thanks and appreciation was 
given to all members over our brotherhood 
who helped to make the mission challenge 
campaign a success. 

The General Mission Board prepared its 
budget for the year which will end February 
28, 1932. This budget, together with budgets 
from the other general Boards, will be pre- 
sented to the Hershey Conference for con- 
sideration and authorization. It is the in- 
tention to present a budget less than what 
has been prepared in previous years. The 
larger budgets were made in light of the 
great need. Year after year the giving was 
less than the sum authorized by Conference. 
While the need is as great as ever the new 
budget is made smaller with the definite in- 
tention that it be raised in full. 

The missionaries in China are greatly in 
need of new church property in the capital 
of the province, Tai Yuan Fu. We have a 
fine group of members there who worship in 
rented quarters that are not at all satisfactory. 
The Board, however, felt that because of the 
unsettled political condition in China and in- 
adequate funds, no grant could be made now 
for this church. 

The Board feels deeply the loss of Brother 
S. Z. Smith, whose recent death causes a dis- 
continuance of the fine evangelistic work 
which he has been doing in the homeland 
under the direction of M. R. Zigler, the 
Board's home secretary. 

Recognizing the value of the Vanderbilt 
Rural Life School, the Board will encourage 
a number of ministers to attend in 1931. 

The treasurer's report for the year past in- 
dicated that both contributors in the home 



May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



131 



church as well as missionaries on the fields 
were very zealous to wipe out the long stand- 
ing deficit. The contributors gave much 
more than usual while the missionaries re- 
duced their expenses considerably under 
previous years. 

Many phases of the Board's work are very 
encouraging and we look forward to the 
future with much hope. The fine response 



from the brotherhood in the recent financial 
effort indicates the strong missionary spirit 
of the Church of the Brethren. Since the 
beginning of the business year, March 1, re- 
ceipts of funds have been very light and 
generous contributions are immediately neces- 
sary or the balance of funds on hand will be 
wiped out an3 a new deficit wil accrue. 

H. S. M. 



Gandhi Passes Through Church of the 
Brethren Mission 



The secretary of the Missionary Educa- 
tion Movement in New York City, recently 
wrote to us, enclosing a clipping from the 
New York Times, April 7. He stated: 
" The Church of the Brethren certainly came 
in for some good advertising in the New 
York Times this morning. This is almost 
the first time within our memory that the 
New York Times has had anything favorable 
to say of foreign mission work." 

The clipping tells of Gandhi's march to 
the sea with 156 volunteers who dipped water 
from the ocean and let it evaporate and 
collected the salt in defiance of the English 
government's salt monopoly. The part of the 
clipping of special interest to Visitor readers 
follows : 

" This morning the correspondent visited 
a pretty two-storied bungalow on the out- 
skirts of Jalalpor, only eleven miles from 
Dandi. Here the Church of the Brethren 
mission, which has its headquarters in Elgin, 
111., has carried on invaluable work since 
1893. The present superintendent is Miss 
E. B. Miller, native of Waterloo, Iowa, who 
for thirty long years has toiled under the 

tropic sun on a labor of love. 



"The correspondent found her this morning 
seated among the pretty brown-skinned chil- 
dren who are her special care. She said 
that when the Mahatma decided to march 
on Dandi many missionaries in other parts 
of India wrote imploring her to take refuge 
from what appeared a possible danger spot. 
Other friends from her own country wrote, 
expressing their alarm that she should be in 
such a troubled country, but the gallant little 
woman stuck to her post, her faith in the 
good sense of the Indian people being justi- 
fied when Mr. Gandhi's volunteers swept 
through Jalalpor with not even a street 
brawl." 

Most stories written by newspaper corres- 
pondents contain the possibility of present- 
ing only part of the truth. Aside from sug- 
gesting that Miss Miller is a little woman, 
this correspondent has been more accurate 
than might be expected. We are sure he 
was right in the use of the word "gallant." 
Now it is either a case that the New York 
Times let this favorable missionary story 
slip in by accident or else the editors do not 
disdain missionary work as much as many 
are led to believe. 



Swept In by the Tide 



Economic Depression in India 

Bulsar is no exception to a reported eco- 
nomic depression throughout India, which 
it appears may become serious. Not only the 
cotton industry is on the verge of collapse, 
but farmers report that practically everything 
they can raise for sale brings in less than the 
cost of production. Unemployment is on the 
increase, resulting in a decline in earnings 
and purchasing power of the people. Trade 
therefore is seriously affected, and many 



people suffer for the want of the bare neces- 
sities of life. Added to such distressing con- 
ditions are railway strikes, and hungry men 
respond, walk out and even refuse pay which 
was due them before the strike was called. 
In this kind of soil, political unrest and op- 
position to the Government grows into seri- 
ous proportions. The picture is not good to 
look upon. Indian Christians generally sup- 
port the Government and are loyal, but many 
are unemployed and find it extremely difficult 



132 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 

1930 



to procure sufficient maintenance for them- 
selves and families. 

Medical Missions in India 

At a meeting of the Medical Missionary 
Association in Calcutta five years ago the 
need of a survey of medical missions in India 
was presented to the members present. This 
survey has been completed recently and the 
following facts are quoted from the report: 
At least one hundred million people in India 
are without medical relief of an approved 
sort. For example : in Central India there are 
26 small states, with a total population of 
4,533,305, in which there are no medical mis- 
sionaries. As for prevalent diseases : the 
death toll from plague and cholera in one 
decade alone (1915-24) totalled 2,375,857 and 
3,187,885 respectively. The record for 
"fevers" reached 50,327,407 for the same 
period. Dysenteries and diarrhoeas claimed 
2,382,298 victims. Smallpox gives an average 
of over 17,000 deaths a year. Leprosy is more 
prevalent than formerly believed and prob- 
ably affects nearly 1,000,000 people. Filarial 
disease is widespread ; hook worm incidence 
in some regions is over 80 per cent ; the round 
worm, or ascaris, has been found in certain 
places to affect more than 95 per. cent of 
high school boys. The universal diseases — 
tuberculosis, influenza, syphilis, gonorrhoea, 
pyorrhoea and the eruptive fevers of child- 
hood — scarlet fever excepted — produce much 
havoc. In 1918 the influenza epidemic caused 
more than seven million deaths. Under the 
Government classification for Respiratory 
Diseases, where pneumonia must be a large 
agent, 3,230,963 deaths were recorded for the 
decade formerly mentioned. The conclusion 
reached is that medical work is not and 
should not be a mere adjunct to the work of 
preaching, but is an integral part of the mis- 
sion of the church. — Dnyanodaya. 

&:■ t-: 

Famine Preventive Measures De- 
pend upon Peace 

The editor of a Chinese periodical, The 
Week in China, comments on the attitude 
of the people of China, as well as the entire 
world, concerning famine conditions. He 
states : " Five to six thousand famine refugees 
gathered for a mass meeting and parade at 



Kaifeng, Honan Province, on February 13, 
with the slogan, 'Save Us!' They will have 
to shout much louder than that before they 
can be heard! They shall have to shout 
above the war cries now being raised in 
China. 

" The entire world — China included — ap- 
parently has listened to their endless appeals 
so long that they no longer create interest. 
Famine victims are being accepted as in- 
evitable, with the same callousness that is 
shown toward the poor. ' The poor, they are 
always with us,' and now it is, ' The starving, 
they are always with us.' This state of mind 
underlies the persistent failure of famine 
campaigns to create a popular appeal. The 
impossibility of reaching the famine victims 
with supplies also has added to the callous 
attitude adopted by the entire world. 

" Famine preventive measures are des- 
perately needed in China. But these depend 
wholly upon peace." 

Near East Foundation Organized 

At a recent meeting of the National Board 
of Trustees of Near East Relief, they were 
faced with the following questions : Should 
they plan to safeguard in the future the life 
and character of these children already 
placed in rural communities in the Near 
East? And, should they carry to those com- 
munities the principles of education, industry, 
health and general welfare which have 
meant so much to our own orphans? As 
Near East Relief was organized for emer- 
gency relief only, the trustees authorized that 
a permanent organization be formed to con- 
serve the opportunities growing out of the 
constructive activities of Near East Relief. 
They have incorporated under the name 
" Near East Foundation " to do this work. 
A survey of the Near East reveals that 
eighty-five per cent of the people are work- 
ing on the land, endeavoring to make a living 
under conditions described as " utterly miser- 
able." Some of the projects now in opera- 
tion or planned by the Near East Foundation 
are as follows : Itinerant health wagons with 
American-trained nurses and local doctors 
giving treatment and instruction in health 
measures; tuberculosis prevention camps; 
American health workers; cooperation with 
native branches of Red Cross; maternity 



May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



133 



centers; child health clinics; itinerant farm 
instruction and school of vocational agricul- 
ture; public field demonstrations; working 
boys' and girls' homes; recreational centers; 
instruction in child care and day nurseries; 
training of teachers and pastors in com- 
munity welfare; model school for deaf; 
and leadership training. 

Chinese Methodists Elect First 
Bishop 

The first Chinese to be elected a Bishop in 
the Methodist Episcopal Church is Wang 
Chih Ping, whose elevation to this office is 
the result of putting into effect the decision 
of the last General Conference of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, allowing the confer- 
ences in Asia to choose their own bishops. 
This is understood to be the first time in the 
history of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
that a bishop has been selected by any other 
body than the General Conference. The new 
step has been taken in order to allow the 
Oriental churches a larger opportunity in de- 
termining their own policies. 

Lord Lytton on Missions 

Lord Lytton, formerly secretary for India, 
Governor of Bengal and Viceroy of India, 
has this to say of the work of the missionary: 

All the missionaries whom I have known 
throw themselves into their work with the 
devotion of a lifelong consecration to the 
high task. This atmosphere of surrender to 
a great purpose pervades all this work. When 
one visits, as I have done, their mission col- 
leges, mission schools, mission hospitals, mis- 
sion orphanages, or mission technical schools, 
one realizes how completely different is the 
orientation of life in these institutions from 
that of corresponding government establish- 
ments. In the latter, all work is done as 
part of an official duty, the regular routine 
that must be accomplished. In the mission- 
ary undertakings it is impossible not to real- 
ize and to appreciate the spirit of service 
to humanity inspired by the Christian ideal 
that pervades the whole life and work of the 
place. 

I have felt it a privilege on a few occasions 
to bear testimony in public to the noble and 
self-sacrificing work of these men and women 
who have gone to India for the sake of her 



THE MISSIONARY VISITOR 

Published Monthly by the Church of the 

Brethren through her General Mission Board. 

H. Spenser Minnich, Editor 

Ada Miller, Assistant Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS $1.00 PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH dona- 
tion of four dollars or more to the General Mission 
Board, either direct or through any congregational 
collection, provided the four dollars or more are given 
by one individual and in no way combined with 
another's gift. Different members of the same family 
may each give four dollars or more and extra sub- 
scriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent 
to persons who they know will be interested in read- 
ing the Visitor. NO VISITOR SUBSCRIPTIONS 
ARE ENTERED UNLESS REQUESTED. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription 
terms do not include a subscription for every four 
dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation 
of four dollars or more, no matter how large the 
donation. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions 
and make remittances payable to GENERAL MIS- 
SION BOARD, 22 S. STATE ST., ELGIN, ILL. 

Entered as second class matter at the postoffice at 
Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 

Membership 

OTHO WINGER, North Manchester, Ind., 1912-1933. 

J. J. YODER, McPherson, Kans., 1908-1934. 

H. H. NYE, Elizabethtown, Pa., 1923-1932. 

J. B. EMMERT, La Verne, Calif., 1924-1931. 

LEVI GARST, Salem, Va., R. R. 1, 192S-1930. 

J. K. MILLER, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1928-1933. 

L. C. MOOMAW, Roanoke, Va., R. R. 2, 1928-1932. 

Officers 

OTHO WINGER, President, 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, Vice-President, 1908-1934. 
CHARLES D. BONSACK, General Secretary, 1921. # 
H. SPENSER MINNICH, Assistant Secretary and 

Editor Missionary Visitor, 1918. 
M. R. ZIGLER, Home Mission Secretary, 1919. 
CLYDE M. CULP, Treasurer, 1920. 

Note. — The bold type date indicates the year when 
Board Members were first elected, the other date the 
year when Board Members' terms expire. 

•Although Bro. Bonsack was not elected secretary 
until 1921 he has been connected with the Board 
since 1906. 



people, and will live and die in that country 
in discharge of their noble vocation. I may 
best sum up my feeling about them by re- 
peating what I wrote home soon after I ar- 
rived in India : " The red carpet which is 
spread for me at official functions would be 
more fittingly laid under the feet of the mis- 
sionary men and women whom I am meet- 
ing from time to time." — Missionary Review 
of the World. 

Don't Miss the June Visitor 

The June number is always an annual re- 
port but this year it will be a special Five 
Year Report. 



The Missionary Visitor 



The 

Conference Offering 

Who does not know the meaning of the Conference offering? 
Who will read this page and has not in previous years contributed 
to this great outpouring of life for the church work! 

The Conference offering is for the work of the church assigned 
to the four general Boards. It is largely missionary. The other phases 
of work help build the strength of the church so she can be more truly 
missionary in spirit. 

Conference Budget 1930-31 

General Mission Board $275,500 

Board of Religious Education 21,500 

General Ministerial Board 8,500 

General Education Board 5,000 

American Bible Society , 500 

$311,000 

THE CONFERENCE OFFERING IS A GIFT OF LOVE. Men, women and children will 
give, generously and gladly. They will not ask, "What do I get back for this gift?" They 
will say, " WHAT CAN I DO FOR OTHERS ?" 

Here is the answer to their question: 

One hundred three missionaries will be kept on the fields of service, in Africa, China, 
India and Scandinavia. They will do their best proclaiming the gospel of Christ to three 
million people among whom ho Christian teachers are at work. 

Nearly $40,000 will be used in Home Mission work. Certainly there is much work to 
be done at home as well as abroad. 

The Board of Religious Education is promoting better Sunday-schools and literature 
for the workers. The children and young people have a better chance because of work 
done in their behalf. Christian ideals of righteous living, peace, simple life and moral ^wel- 
fare are being taught. 

The Ministerial Board is helping make the ministry more effective. They face the 
task of securing, selecting, training, and placing ministers, also the work of ministerial 
relief for aged ministers and widows. 

The Education Board is supervising the great field of Christian Education. Many stu- 
dents have a chance because of the Board's Rotary Fund. 

The American Bible Society has gained a great reputation for making the Word of God 
possible in places where it was not the common possession of every man before. 

MAY 25 THE OFFERING 

This date or some other should be used to bring the program of the church 
before every member. Let congregations strive to do better than before. Iso- 
lated members should send their gift direct to 



GENERAL MISSION BOARD 
Elgin, 111. 



May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitoi 



135 



China s Annual Meeting 

I. E. OBERHOLTZER* 



THE outstanding news of the Liao 
Chow station for the month of Feb- 
ruary is the fact of the Annual 
Meeting (Nien-i-hui) of the Church of the 
Brethren in China, held here in the city of 
Liao Chow, from the 13th to the 15th, three 
days. This conference is made up of two 
groups of delegates : standing committee 
delegates and delegates sent up from the 
village and city churches. The standing 
committee consists of eight members of 
whom one half are foreigners and the other 
half Chinese. This body functions much as 
does the standing committee of the confer- 
ence in the states, with the additional re- 
sponsibility of passing upon all matters of 
finance before going to the General Mission 
Board. Each year the conference selects its 
own standing committee. The second group 
of delegates are selected on the basis of 
one delegate for every fifteen members. 
These are predominantly Chinese who repre- 
sent their own local village churches. 

The conference this year was unusually 
small in attendance, due largely to the re- 
moteness of our city as well as the season 
of the year, although the weather happened 
to be ideally warm throughout the meeting. 
The membership of our church has not yet 
grown to the point of church loyalty and 
spirituality, when they will make great 
efforts and sacrifices to attend. Three and 
four days of donkey travel away from home 
represents a greater undertaking to our 
brethren than the same number of days on 
a limited express from east to west in the 
states. Some came heaving in on bicycles, 
tired and exhausted, and others came in 
autos. When the roll was called there were 
forty-two voting members. 

The day before the opening of conference 
was taken up by standing committee busi- 
ness, finance committee business and school 
board considerations. All the budgets for 
the year 1931 and estimates for needed ex- 
penditures that would arise by that time, 
were carefully considered at this meeting. 
However, the question of greatest concern 
at this time was the one of registering our 
primary schools of the mission with the 



•Missionary, Liao Chow, Shansi, China. 



Chinese government. The question was 
under advisement for several years, but only 
received its final approval at this meeting. 
The proclamation has gone out from re- 
sponsible authorities that all mission and 
privately owned schools would have to 
register by the end of March, or close, so 
there seemed to be no other alternative than 
to register and give the system a trial. The 
question is involved in uncertainties, but the 
hope of all is that the change may go for- 
ward to a satisfactory issue. 

The first day of the conference was en- 
tirely taken with the consideration of the 
Forward Evangelistic Movement, otherwise 
called the Five Year Movement. You will 
have already read of it in an article which 
appeared in the Messenger several months 
ago, written by Bro. Harlan Smith. We 
have talked of it for months, but we need 
to enlist the cooperation of our Chinese 
leaders, evangelists and delegate member- 
ship. The aim of this movement is the 
strengthening of the Chinese church. It is 
to be accomplished in two ways, defined as 
the deepening of the spiritual life of the 
members of the church and the outworking 
of that spiritual life in witness-bearing. It 
is to be an expression of the love of the 
members of the churches for their Lord. 
And it is to be an evidence to the non- 
Christians that the Chinese Christian church 
is in a very true sense indigenous. To this 
end it is planned to carry out a vigorous 
evangelistic program in the hope that within 
the next five years the number of Christians 
will at least be doubled. Ways and means 
were considered whereby we might work 
more effectively and helpfully among the 
Christians and village people. The move- 
ment has nothing new in it. As said, it is 
just a vigorous attempt to do more effec- 
tively the job that has brought us to China, 
and then make this motive contagious with 
our brethren. 

The second and third days of the confer- 
ence were occupied with details of minor 
importance, such as the hearing of reports 
of work in the various departments of the 
mission and church, and the selection, nom- 
ination and election of officers and various 



136 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



committees for the ensuing year. Pastor Li, 
of the church at Tai Yuan Fu, was moder- 
ator of the conference ; Mr. Koo, principal 
of the boys' school at Ping Ting, was Chi- 
nese secretary; and Minerva Metzger was 
English secretary. The officers for next 
year are : moderator, Dr. Hsing of the Chow 
Yang hospital; Chinese secretary, Mr. Koo; 
English secretary, Minerva Metzger. 

During each day of the conference there 
was one hour given to subjects of a devo- 
tional nature. Evangelists Ch'en, Hutchin- 
son, and Smith each led our thinking on 
subjects related to the deeper spiritual life. 
There is a tendency in these conferences to 
deal only with the machinery and finances 
of the chiUrch, but there came an urgent 
request tliat the conference program com- 
mittee plan definitely to provide an atmos- 
phere of worship and spiritual nurture that 
each delegate might take home with him and 
retain after the hard matter-of-fact items of 
the meeting were forgotten. 

It is to be regretted that a number of 



delegates could not attend. It is to be 
hoped, too, that as the church moves forward 
in experience and grace, the pay-roll repre- 
sentation in the conference will give way 
to the influence of the lay membership, 
however unlearned and inexperienced they 
may appear. The missionary has gone great 
lengths in turning over responsibilities to 
the Chinese church during recent years ; but 
the church will gain nothing in experience 
of self-government and cultivating the in- 
digenous atmosphere if the educated class 
and those receiving a salary take aggressive 
leadership too freely. Our Chinese brethren 
are taking responsibility nobly and growing 
wonderfully in the art of working together. 
The meeting was seasoned with the finest 
spirit of cooperation and forbearance to 
differing opinions. 

China is again on the brink of civil strife. 
Will you not remember the Chinese brethren 
and the church in her struggle for existence 
and survival. 



A Day That Is Done 

MRS. FLORENCE MOYER BOLLINGER* 



AS of a day that is done, the memories 
of the past seven years of my life 
in the Church of the Brethren In- 
dustrial School unroll before me.' A day 
with its hopes and fears, its joys and sor- 
rows. For, indeed what complete day does 
not contain some of these elements? 

This brilliant moonlight night on which I 
am writing recalls the many moonlight 
nights of rare beauty and splendor we have 
enjoyed in the Blue Ridge hills ; nights of 
dazzling whiteness, lighting up the moun- 
tains and valleys and the wide expanse of 
starry heavens. Ere another moon comes 
along, the mountains will be arrayed in their 
springtime beauty, the white of dogwood, 
red of red-bud, yellow of clove and the 
tinted wild cherry ; and the air will be per- 
fumed by their fragrance. When other 
memories fade, these will still refresh my 
mind and soul. 

Am I glad for the seven years I have 
spent here? Emphatically, yes! The expe- 
rience has given me a liberal education in 



Teacher in the Church of the Brethren Industrial 
School for a number of years. 



the school of hard knocks and an opportu- 
nity to put to use all greater or lesser 
talents. True, I am far from satisfied with 
my ability to cope with many of the prob- 
lems which confront a school of this sort, 
but I have learned many valuable lessons 
and trust I have taught a few too — lessons 
that are not always found in books but in 
human contacts and association. Many 
flowers have been planted about the home 
where we have lived the past few years, 
and the question has often been asked me, 
"Aren't you sorry that you put so much 
into this home which is not your own, and 
leave it?" No, I am not sorry; if I have 
planted flowers where weeds grew before, 
then I am glad. I trust that in the soil of 
the young hearts I have touched, some 
weeds may have been uprooted or wilted, 
and the roots of better impulses nurtured. 
The twig does respond to bending one way 
or another. 

A few years ago I climbed with a group 
of school girls to the top of Parker Moun- 
tain where a very fine view of the school 
and surrounding country lay before our 



May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



137 



sight. There flashed into my mind at once, 
"A city set on a hill can not be hid." The 
verse seemed to refer to C. B. I. S. How 
frequently we are asked, " Does the work 
pay? Are you getting results?" Who can 
say? Who can immediately measure the 
returns of that seed which is sown into the 
ground? Sower and harvester are seldom 
privileged to reap and rejoice over the same 
harvest. Most assuredly youth is the seed- 
time of life and if the laborers in the C. B. 
I. S. do their best with the youth entrusted 
to their care, there is a promise of a rich 
harvest. 

In a few weeks or months I shall say 
good-bye to all associations in Greene 
County, and my stay here will be done. 
Having been one of the first workers in 
the school I have had ample chance to watch 



the changes and achievements which have 
been attained through the years. I believe 
God in his own good way blesses every 
worthy effort — that he will bless this school 
to a great and good end. Can we have any 
better watchword than " HOPE " to tide us 
over our difficulties and help us look toward 
the future and the realization of our ideal 
for the school? 

Browning's thought for an individual 
might well be applied to an institution, when, 
in Rabbi Ben Ezra he says : 

" Grow old along with me : 
The best is yet to be, 
The last of life, for which the first was 

made : 
Our times are in his hand 
Who saith 'A whole I planned, 
Youth shows but half; trust God: see all, 

nor be afraid!' " 



O 



A Picture Study 

F. H. CRUMPACKER* 

N your left as you face the picture The following incident was the occasion 

you will see standing in the front of this picture : We were holding a Bible 

class for members in the t place and on 
Sunday just before the class closed the 
government school teacher, standing to the 
extreme right, who is one of our Christians 
but teaching in this county seat girls' schoo), 
brought her class of girls to the preaching 
service. They all sat for nearly an hour 
* Pioneer Missionary to China. and listened very respectfully to a Gospel 



row one of our lay evangelists and 
his wife. They have charge of this out- 
station and the surrounding country, about 
ten miles out in each direction. The evan- 
gelist's mother is sitting in front holding 
their youngest son. Their other son stands 
by the side of his mother. 




138 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



sermon that was preached by the man at 
the extreme left on the back row. This 
man is principal of our boys' school at Ping 
Ting and had come out here about sixteen 
miles to be at the love' feast that was to 
be held on the next day. 

He gave a sermon suited to school children 
and our older people who stand near him 
in the picture enjoyed it too. The day 
after this picture was taken we had a com- 
munion at which about thirty-five members 
communed. And thus ended one of our 



first attempts at a Bible class for members 
at this outstation. It was a beginning and 
we hope that as time goes on the folks 
will attend in larger numbers. It does one's 
heart good to see some of these young 
people taking part as they did here, the 
young man doing the preaching and the 
young girl who is a teacher in a government 
school bringing these girls to hear the Gos- 
pel. If our Christians will accept leadership 
it will be only a short time until many of 
the Chinese young people will be in the fold. 



Activities of Student Volunteers, Manchester 

College 



LO, the winter is past and the rain is 
over and gone ; the flowers appear on 
the earth; the time of the singing of 
birds is come, and the voice of the turtle- 
dove is heard in our land; the fig tree put- 
teth forth her green figs, and the vines with 
the tender grape give a good smell." This 
joyousness and life expressed by Solomon 
is the same that is felt by our little Student 
Volunteer Ban'd of Manchester College at 
the opening of this spring term. Just as the 
beautiful things of nature are growing and 
opening up to beautify the earth for man, so 
this group of volunteers is endeavoring to 
beautify this earth for God by spreading the 
spirit of love, and giving service to man- 
kind. 

We have about twenty-six members in our 
group. Twenty have signed the pledge card 
for service at home, and six for service on 
the foreign field. Every Monday evening 
we meet in one of the society halls of the 
college to discuss and study some of the 
problems that every young person going in- 
to this type of work must consider. At the 
present time we are studying the book, 
" Roads to the City of God," by Mathews. 
This book gives a rather detailed account of 
the Jerusalem conference held in 1928 at 
Jerusalem, and all the problems discussed 
there by the religious leaders from all over 
the world. The students are taking an ac- 
tive part in this study and seem to enjoy it 
very much. 

Just now we are busy with deputation 
work. We have two teams on the field and 
are recruiting another one. The first team 



has visited three churches in Southern Ohio, 
five in Northwestern Ohio, and three in 
Northern Indiana. Others have been sched- 
uled. As a part of their program, this team 
has presented in each church, the play, 
" Ordered South." The message of this play 
is directed toward business men and the 
business world, with the attempt to interest 
them in missions and help them to see the 
necessity of the same. The second and third 
teams have five churches in Northeastern 
Ohio, five in Northwestern Ohio, and a pos- 
sible three in Michigan. The second team 
is presenting the play, " The Color Line." 
The theme in this play is an attempt to 
abolish racial distinction between the Chinese 
and the Americans. 

On February 21-23, a part of the Man- 
chester group had the privilege of attending 
the Indiana State Volunteer Conference at 
the Anderson Theological Seminary. The 
opinion is unanimous that this was one of 
the most interesting and inspiring meetings 
that we have ever attended. The speakers, 
Miss Doreing, who has spent thirty years as 
a pioneer among the cannibal tribes in 
Africa, Mr. Hukeby, the national secretary 
of the Volunteer Movement in the U. S., Dr. 
Shute, the founder of the Methodist Theo- 
logical Seminary in India, and Mr. Balwin, 
a missionary from Burma, stressed the fact 
that real Christian leadership is made by 
filling the souls of men and women with the 
light of Jesus Christ and His Gospel. We 
are also glad to state that one of our group, 
Mr. Roy Nicholson, has been elected State 
(Continued on Page 144) 



May 
19 JO 



The Missionary Visitor 



39 



News from the Fields 



AFRICA 
Garkida 

Zsther E. Beahm 
Furlough Party and New Missionaries 
Arrive at Garkida 

January 5 was a happy day at Garkida. 
About 4:30 P. M. in drove Heckmans, 
bringing with them the Rupels, Elnora 
Schechter, Clara Harper and Sara Shisler 
from America. For days we had been look- 
ing for them. The Buras as well as the 
missionaries gave them a hearty reception. 
One of the newcomers was heard to say 
that never before had she experienced such 
joyous greetings. There followed a week 
of mission committee meetings, ending in 
the annual meeting of the entire staff. Then 
the Kulps and Rupels were off for Lassa. 

Yola Chieftain 
Visits Garkida 

The Emir of Yola gave us a visit and 
seemed very much interested in all our work. 
When he left he said that the most wonder- 
ful thing he had seen was Jane Vena 
Robertson. He had never seen a white 
child. She received a number of gifts from 
him. 

New Life in 

Boys' and Girls' Schools 

The Boys' School took on new life after 
Christmas since some of our faithful boys 
came from West Bura. They are an es- 
pecially splendid group and we are happy 
that they have come here since we are not 
allowed to go over into their country. The 
Girls' School welcomed Sara Shisler back 
again. 

New Workers in the 
Hospital, Garkida 

The hospital has also received new help 
in the persons of Clara Harper and Nurse 
Schechter. Clara is working full time in 
the hospital. Nurse Schechter is staying at 
Garkida a few weeks to become acquainted 
with a few of the common African ailments 
and the way they are treated at Garkida. 
This will be just a short course in tropical 
diseases, which are all too different from 
those in the U. S. Clara is finding time to 
make the village calls that had to be 
neglected last year. She goes into the near- 
by homes where the patients cannot come 
to the hospital. She also feels that part of 
her mission to the hospital patients is to 
give them regular talks and personal spirit- 
ual help. The leper work has a shadow cast 
on it at present as some the patients are 
Mohammedan and are refusing treatment 
during their fast month. 



CHINA 
Shou Yang 
Frances S. Smith 
Sister Cripe Returns to Yu Hsien — 
Idols Torn Down 

In the early part of November Sister 
Cripe went to Yu Hsien where there are 
about twenty-five Christians who need en- 
couragement and help. She made a few 
trips out in the villages and visited many 
homes in the city. A splendid Christmas 
service was held at the Yu Hsien church, 
the Christmas message being given in the 
forenoon followed by a social hour. Jan- 
uary 18 was the day set for taking down 
the idols from the temples in the city. This 
broadens our opportunities and increases our 
responsibility. Now after two months spent 
at Shou Yang, Sister Cripe has returned to 
her work there. 

Men Reorganize 
Evangelistic Work 

In the men's evangelistic work, Bro. Ho 
Wei will have general oversight of the 
itinerating evangelists, with special emphasis 
upon a systematic effort to give the Chris- 
tians a better knowledge of the Bible. Bro. 
Smith will oversee the out-station organiza- 
tion, while Bro. Heisey will give most of his 
time to the local work in Shou Yang and 
vicinity. Bro. Smith has the difficult task 
of trying to make a work that has been 
subsidized, self-supporting and indigenous. 
We are electing committees in each place 
to have general oversight of the work. 

Missionaries Requested to 
Intercede in Lawsuits 

Since the foreigner in China has free 
intercourse with the magistrate, he is often 
beset with requests from the Chinese to 
intercede in their lawsuits. Bro. Heisey 
reports five such requests for February. In 
every case it is our policy to plead with 
the people to give up their idea of such 
quarrels. If we can intervene and thus help 
to settle out of court, we are happy. 

Dr. Meng Joins 
Hospital Staff 

Dr. Meng joined the hospital staff early 
in February. There are thirteen patients in 
the hospital now at the end of February, 
eight of whom are maternity cases. The 
county magistrate has asked the hospital to 
supervise the vaccination of children in the 
county this spring again. 



140 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



One Christian Woman Touched 
by Story of Christ's Death 

Those of us who have heard the sweet 
old Gospel story from childhood, sometimes 
because of being so familiar with it do not 
respond to it as do some of these simple- 
hearted folks to whom it is a new and won- 
derful story. The other evening following 
the women's worship hour, Mrs. Chao, a 
Christian woman of a bit more than two 
years said, " When I read about how Jesus 
suffered and died I can not refrain from 
weeping. I don't understand how folks can 
read about it and not be touched." Truly 
we can thank the Father for the way he 
is revealing the truth to these " babes " in 
Christ. The growth of this little Christian 
woman has been most remarkable. She is 
indeed being taught of God. 

"Come Often" Is 

the Cry from the Villages 

The week of evangelism was observed as 
usual this year. Groups of men and women 
visited the near-by villages where there were 
Christians or other interested parties. All 
felt that the special effort made was well 
worth while. One woman in a village which 
we had only touched each year during evan- 
gelistic week, is reported as saying, " If you 
would only come oftener so we could learn 
to understand this Gospel." This is the 
challenge of so many places. 

Tai Yuan 
Sara Z. Myers 
Mr. Baker to Direct 
Relief Work in China 

We are rejoicing, especially those who are 
working with the Shansi Famine Relief 
Commission, that funds have been and are 
being raised in America to relieve the 
famine conditions in Northwest China. Our 
province has two sections which will receive 
help. And on February 28, Mr. J. E. Baker, 
who was director of the American Red Cross 
relief work in 1921, arrived in Tai Yuan as 
Director of Relief Work in all China. Those 
of us who know him are more than pleased 
to have him in this work because of his 
experience in the same kind of undertakings 
and because of his extraordinary fitness for 
this task. While money will not be enough, 
and is coming too late to care for the situa- 
tion adequately, very much relief will be 
given wisely under the direction of this 
capable man. 

Children from Famine Section 
to Be Brought to Tai Tuan 

A number of Christians and friends in Tai 
Yuan desired to help some way in relief 
work, so have organized and raised money 
to bring a hundred or more children from 



the worst famine section of the adjoining 
province, Shensi, to Tai Yuan and keep 
them for a few months. It was thought 
better to keep a small number over the 
whole worst period than to just extend the 
life of a larger number a few days or weeks 
and then let them die. This work is now 
well under way and we expect to have the 
children here in a short time. 

Plans for Students' Activities 
During the New Year 

The city is again lively with students 
from all over the province who have re- 
turned to resume their studies after the 
Chinese New Year Vacation, which extends 
from about January first to March first. 
The Y. M. C. A. is quite busy organizing and 
planning for its students and boys' work. 
A Boys' Secretary has joined the staff since 
the first of January. Mr. Ikenberry is busy 
arranging for English classes, and working 
with others to plan for the religious needs 
of interested students. 

Mother and Son of Influential Non- 
Christian Home Accept Christ 

Our Chinese and missionary workers were 
made to rejoice a few days ago when a 
mother in an influential non-Christian home 
told Mrs. Chang, our woman evangelist, that 
she and one of her sons wanted to accept 
Christ and unite with the church. This 
family has been cultivated for several years 
hoping and praying that the day would come 
when Christ would be accepted in their 
hearts. We are hoping other members of 
the family will follow. After a period of 
teaching' and training we shall be happy to 
receive them into our church group. 

Liao Chou 

Ruth F. Ulrey 
Heart-broken Mother 
Begs to Die 

Recently Miss Hutchison was calling in 
one of the Liao homes, which has experi- 
enced one sorrow after another. The dear 
old mother, heart-broken with grief over 
the loss of her husband, two sons and just 
recently a grandson, refused to be com- 
forted, saying, " I want to die. I have too 
much sorrow. What great sin have I com- 
mitted that God is punishing me thus in 
my old age? Please pray God to let me 
die, no matter where I go, just so I leave 
this earth." She was told of Jesus, the sin- 
less one, who had suffered and died for us 
and wanted her to go to that happy home 
above. She was also told that when she 
reached that home she could see Miss 
Hutchison's mother. She then hopefully 
replied, " When I get there, then I and your 
mother will be friends." 






May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



141 



Problem of Registering Schools 
Requires Much Attention 

The registering of schools, which has be- 
come almost a necessity due to recent gov- 
ernment action, is now requiring a great 
deal of attention. A local Educational Board 
has just been elected to work out the neces- 
sary details. The members of this Board, 
who are non-faculty members, together with 
the assistance of the principals of the two 
schools concerned, are spending much time 
and effort on this question. The hope of all 
is that bigger and better schools will be 
the outgrowth of this venture. 

Men's Evangelistic Department 
Makes Plans 

The workers in the Men's Evangelistic 
Department are busy with plans for their 
work. A few days ago Mr. Oberholtzer met 
with the Chinese men who are helping him, 
giving them encouragement and advice be- 
fore they start out for several more months 
of work. 

Mr. Wampler just met with his helpers 
to make plans for the tent work which is 
opening about the middle of March. One 
of the aims of the meeting was to outline 
"subject material" to be used in this work. 
The ready response given by the Chinese 
evangelists showed an interest in the work 
on their part, as well as evidence of having 
gotten down to rock bottom, in part at 
least — such as could only come from their 
experience in work. 

Death Visits Three 
Christian Homes 

Our hearts are again saddened by the visit 
of the grim reaper — death. In passing he 
called a young wife and mother, Mrs. Ho, 
who was a graduate of our girls' school and 
had taught in this school for six years. She 
was faithful to her duty both in school and 
home, never giving up as long as her 
strength permitted her to be about her tasks. 
She had been a member of the Church of 
the Brethren since childhood. Our hearts 
go out in sympathy to the young husband 
and eleven months' old daughter. Will you 
pray for them that they may fully learn to 
realize their Savior's love and may lead 
many others to love him too? Two other 
Christian homes are laying their loved ones 
to rest at this writing. 

Young Mountaineer Attends 
Annual Conference 

February 13-15 the Chinese-foreign Annu- 
al conference convened at this place and a 
very enjoyable time was spent together in 
planning for the work, and sharing inspira- 
tional help. One of the delegates to the 
conference was a young mountaineer from 
the Ping Ting territory. He will have many 



new things to tell upon his return home. 
For the first time he saw a cart driven by 
animals, for the roads around his home are 
only mountain trails where pack animals are 
used. For the first time he saw a bicycle, 
an automobile, a foreigner's home and ate 
foreign food. Although this young man 
knows little about the outside world, he 
knows his Lord. He readily responded when 
asked to lead in prayer in the presence of 
elders, teachers and all. 

Another delegate told of his experiences 
during the Boxer Rebellion. Six from his 
home lost their lives because they would 
not deny their faith in Christ. He, a young 
boy, escaped by hiding in the mountains 
until the danger period was over. 

Progress in Education 
of Women in China 

The spring term of our Women's Bible 
School has opened with brighter prospects 
than ever before. It is with joy that help 
is given to lead these ne_dy women to the 
" Gospel Light." Some are ready and eager 
to learn ; while others need much encourage- 
ment before they feel the need of such help, 
or feel that they can learn. Added to this, 
assistance must be given in helping them 
to overcome the difficulties and hindrances 
which arise in their own homes. However, 
with the general " Spirit of Progress " in 
China today, there is new interest in the 
education of her women. This influence is 
felt even in the interior of the country, and 
especially among the younger women. 

Ping Ting 

Emma Horning 

Workers Volunteer 

for Evangelistic Work 

Evangelistic week called forth a host of 
volunteer workers. Sixteen men and a 
number of school boys formed four groups 
and preached in eighteen villages around 
Ping Ting. Kao Lao formed three groups 
and preached in a number of villages around 
this city. Le Ping and Luan Lu each formed 
one band and worked in the villages around 
their station. This volunteer work not only 
helps to spread the Gospel but deepens the 
spiritual life of the 'church members. 

The women divided into ten bands of two 
and three each and visited several hundred 
homes in the city. At each place they 
gathered in the neighbors and gave lessons 
on child training. Jesus and his home was 
used as the great example. The women 
returned from each day's work with glowing 
reports of the way their messages had been 
received. They reported that even the dogs 
did not try to bite them when they went in 
the homes. 



142 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 

1930 



Bible Classes Held 
in Near-by Villages 

Mr. and Mrs. Crumpacker and Haven 
spent the last week of the month at Tien 
Ching Keo among the .Christians there. 
They held a Bible class, and had baptizing 
and communion for the little group. Miss 
Schaeffer and Mrs. Chai are spending two 
weeks at Soa Fang, visiting in the homes 
and holding meetings for the Christians and 
non-Christians as well. 

" Freedom of Women " — Theme of 
Mothers and Daughters' Organization 

On Feb. 18 a Mothers and Daughters' As- 
sociation was organized in the city. It is 
composed of 100 delegates from the various 
schools of the county. A delegate was sent 
from our girls' school who gave a report 
of the work done there. A woman was 
appointed chairman, but men teachers were 
there to assist and listen. Songs were sung, 
Sun Yat-sen's teachings were read, followed 
by meditations. Then speeches were made 
on the freedom of women. To have this 
freedom the children must be educated. 
Hygiene must be taught in the homes and 
footbinding must cease. 

In the afternoon the meeting was con- 
tinued, decisions were made and representa- 
tives appointed, with salaries, to carry out 
these decisions. Girls must go to school, 
mothers who kill the babies they do not 
want will be imprisoned, those > who treat 
their daughters-in-law cruelly will be tried 
in court, women witch doctors will be im- 
prisoned, villages that allow footbinding will 
be fined, and hygiene shall be taught in the 
villages. What we have been teaching for 
twenty years they are now attempting to 
enforce through this association of the gov- 
ernment. Can you imagine what this will 
mean for the future of this county if these 
decisions are carried out? God is working 
through them to free these women. Pray 
that they may have strength to go forward. 

School Girls Sacrifice 
for Famine Sufferers 

Famine will be most severe these four 
spring months before anything can be pro- 
duced. To help out in a small way our 
church has made monthly pledges to aid in 
this work. The school' girls have no money 
to give so have decided to eat only cornmeal 
instead of flour and save the difference to 
give the starving. Others are making sim- 
ilar sacrifices to divide their meager living 
with the more needy. We hope to send 
some $200.00 a month. 

Early Rain 
Is Welcomed 

We were given a surprise Feb. 22 in the 
form of a rain. We can not remember 



ever having a rain so early. After a few 
days it turned colder and a heavy snow fell. 
Since .that time it has been raining, sleeting 
and snowing according to the rise and fall 
of the temperature. Everybody is rejoicing 
over the amount of moisture that is falling 
but it makes traveling very bad. 

Usual Spring War in China 
Looks Inevitable 

Most of the soldiers have left the city, in 
fact most of them have left the province. 
The soldiers of all the provinces are moving 
towards Nanking. The usual spring war 
seems to be inevitable. General Yen seems 
to be doing all he can to hold it back but 
only time will tell what the final result will 
be. The thirst of the god of war may still 
call for the blood of thousands. 

Personals 

Mrs. Pollock spent two days with us on 
her way to Liao. She has just returned 
from her inter-furlough vacation with her 
parents at McPherson, Kans. Nettie Senger 
spent two days with us on her way to 
Peiping where she is doing some work in 
Yen Ching University. Mr. and Mrs. Bright 
spent two days on a business trip to Shou 
Yang. The Ping Ting Station gave a fare- 
well dinner to the two Norwegian ladies of 
the Faith Mission. They are leaving for a 
much needed furlough. One of them has 
not been home for ten years. Sixteen dele- 
gates attended the mission meeting at Liao — 
six foreigners and ten Chinese — from Ping 
Ting. 

INDIA 

Kathryn Garner 

Smallpox Epidemic 

in Bombay Presidency 

In the last few months there was an epi- 
demic of smallpox in a virulent form 
throughout all of Bombay Presidency. 
Anklesvar, Vali, Vyara and Bulsar are sur- 
rounded with it. There has been one case 
in Vali boarding school and one in the 
Christian community. One of our teachers 
near Khergam has four victims of the dis- 
ease in his home. We had five cases in the 
Ahwa Boarding which the government 
doctor diagnosed smallpox but it was a very 
light form. In our schools we quarantined 
but in the country where no such regula- 
tions are observed it is very hard to keep 
the disease from spreading, so we must vac- 
cinate and revaccinate. There have been 
300 vaccinations in Bulsar dispensary besides 
350 in schools and Christian communities at 
other stations. The government has also 
vaccinated many of our school children in 
some localities. 



May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



143 



New Plan for Giving — 
Offerings Increased 

At the council meeting of the Umalla-Vali 
Congregation, it was decided that the first 
Sunday of each month be Tithe Offering 
Sunday. Instead of giving one-tenth to the 
church each month, on this day each mem- 
ber brings his offering bag, supplied by the 
treasurer, containing one-sixteenth of his 
income for the month, and the remainder up 
to the tenth is kept for Sunday-school offer- 
ings and other benevolent purposes. This 
plan has proved to be an improvement over 
the one of last year, since by giving the 
tenth in a lump sum, some felt they had 
nothing to give at other times. The whole 
congregation takes part. The farmers put 
in their offering or bring cotton and grain, 
or promise to bring when crops are har- 
vested. It is very inspiring on offering Sun- 
day to see each family, widows as well, go 
forward and put their gift on the altar. As 
a result an offering of 51 Rupees and five 
annas (about $19.00) was lifted one Sunday. 
There was an increase in attendance on that 
Sunday and both Sunday-school and church 
offerings showed a marked increase. 

School Boys Sacrifice Breakfast 
for District Meeting Offering 

An offering for District Meeting is also 
being taken in this congregation. Many are 
denying themselves that the amount pledged 
might be raised. The boys in the boarding 
school have gone without food in the morn- 
ings for a month and have put the amount 
that would have been spent for that into 
the collection. The different classes in the 
school have had field projects of cotton and 
from their share of that they have given 
liberally too. 

Educational Inspector and Executive 
Engineer Visit Vali 

On Feb. 4 the Deputy Educational In- 
spector visited the Vali school. He brought 
with him the Executive Engineer of Raj 
Pipla State. This was the first visit from 
the latter. He was very much interested 
in the whole plant and promised us his help 
and cooperation. 

Recently Baptized Christians 
Witness for Christ 

The evangelistic workers of Anklesvar 
district felt a special blessing when seven- 
teen persons from one village were baptized. 
The leaders of this group are especially 
brave and we look forward with interest to 
their life of faithfulness. Their testimonies 
even now are worth while ; although most of 
them are illiterate, they know how to give 
answers to those who treat them unfairly. 
It is evident that the Lord gives them words 
to speak that both convince and surprise 
their persecutors. On Monday three others 



came from the same village for baptism, 
having been detained by their task masters 
the day before. We were glad for their 
determination. In all, twenty-two accepted 
Christ in those two days. 

Girls' School Program 

Interrupted by Epidemic 

The Anklesvar girls' hostel has been ex- 
ceptionally free from disease this last year 
but there is now an epidemic of measles 
and chickenpox. It decidedly spoils the 
school program, as you may know, for we 
always have strict segregation with any sort 
of contagion. 

Matron of Jalalpor Boarding 
School Is Married 

After many delays Jivibai Makanji was 
married, having served in the Jalalpor 
Boarding as matron for six years. She was 
the first girl to be enrolled in the school 
when it was opened in 1918. She had com- 
pleted fifth grade here and spent a year at 
Anklesvar in sixth grade. 

School Children Take Examination 
in Sunday-school Course 

Of the 120 children in the Machad school 
who entered the oral examination in the 
Village Sunday-school course, 118 of them 
passed. 

Jalalpor Directs 

Evangelistic Work 

The Jalalpor Church has taken over the 
direction of the evangelistic work in this 
area under the devolution scheme. B. M. 
Mow is chairman of the evangelistic com- 
mittee and Chaganlal Virchand is secretary. 
The committee holds its meetings the last 
Saturday of each month. 

Dates for District Meetings 
of India 

The Jalalpor Church is getting ready to 
entertain the District Meeting of the First 
District of India to convene Feb. 28 to 
March 3. The Marathi District Meeting, 
Second District of India, will meet at 
Dahanu at the same time. 

Wagoner Family on Evangelistic 
Tour in Vyara District 

Brother J. E. Wagoner and family have 
been out in the evangelistic tent in Vyara 
District since December. They are now in 
their tenth camp. Each night pictures on 
the life of Christ are shown. As a rule all 
meetings have been well attended. In a 
number of places evidence of Arya Samaj 
opposition is seen but the Christian message 
is given in spite of such hindrance. In the 
distant village of Davelpadi five were bap- 
tized. Three of these were women, wives 
of men who have been Christian for a short 
time. 



144 

Vyara Students Find Time 
for Evangelistic Work 

The Vyara school boys and girls have been 
going out over week-ends quite frequently 
to help in the evangelistic work. During 
part of the day the teachers and pupils in 
Wankal-Khergam boarding schools, as well 
as in the district schools, go here and there 
in groups selling and distributing religious 
literature. At the close of the day, and up 
until midnight, often these various groups 
conduct religious services. Our elder's wife, 
who has charge of the girls in the boarding 
school and is head mistress of the day 
school, besides her home duties finds time 
to come with the group of larger girls to 
the near-by night meetings. Our girls sing 
so well that when they go back to the 
villages whence they came it has a marked 
effect on those who do not favor education 
of girls and women. 

Work of Bulsar Pastor and Student 
Hindered by Illness 

For almost a year Bro. Covindji Satvedi, 
pastor of Bulsar Church, has not been able 
to do active work because of tuberculosis. 
Also one of the Bible school students, Bro. 
Ranchod Rama, has not been able to carry 
on his regular class-work. Both have made 
very satisfactory progress so that at this 
time the disease is in an arrested condition. 

B. Mary Royer Welcomed 
at Ahwa 

B. Mary Royer landed in Bombay Feb. 3. 
We are most grateful to have her with us 
at Ahwa. She arrived here Feb. 10 and has 
been busy getting settled. 

«5* «£• 
ACTIVITIES OF STUDENT VOLUN- 
TEERS, MANCHESTER COLLEGE 

(Continued from Page 138) 

president of the volunteer groups for the 
coming year. 

At the present time the members of our 
Volunteer Band are taking care of the Mis- 
sion Chapel in the west part of Manchester. 
This gives the students, who aspire to do 
mission work, ample opportunity to carry 
out their aims and ambitions in a small way. 

The world is full of need and we are glad 
that there are other volunteers like ourselves 
who are willing to sacrifice their mite that 
others less fortunate than they can find hap- 
piness in the truth of the light of Jesus 
Christ, the Savior of the world.— Student 
Volunteers, Manchester College. 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



INTERNATIONAL PEACE 

Mrs. Ada C. Sell 

Methought the days of which Isaiah 

dreamed 
Had come, and I enraptured was to see 
The little group, in which to me it seemed 
The wolf and lamb were mingling peace- 
fully ; 
The calf and the young lion were in play 
And o'er them all a little child held sway; 
And some were beating swords into plow- 
shares ; 
How gladly they did pound! while near at 

hand 
Still others pruning-hooks did make from 

spears ; 
For strife and wars had ceased the world 

around; 
I wakened, and I could not help but pray 
That warring fleets of sea and air, and all 
Of war should cease; no more the battle- 
call; 
And peace among the nations come to stay ! 
Altoona, Pa. 

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO YOU 

There's a sweet, old story translated for 
man, 
But writ in the long, long ago. 
The Gospel according to Mark, Luke, and 
John, 
Of Christ and His works here below. 

Men read and admire the gospel of Christ, 
With its love so unfailing and true, 

But what do they think and what do they 
say, 
'Of the Gospel according to You? 

'Tis a wonderful story, this gospel of love, 
As it shines in the Christ-life divine, 

And O that its truth might be told again, 
In the story of your life and mine. 

Unselfishness mirrors on every scene, 

Love blossoms on every sod, 
And back from its vision the soul comes to 
tell 

The wonderful goodness of God. 

You're writing each day a letter for man, 
Take care that the writing is true, 

For the only gospel that some men read 
Is the Gospel according to You. 

— Selected. 

"Be strong! 
We are not here to play, to dream, to drift ; 
We have hard work to do and loads to lift ; 
Shun not the battle— face it ; 'tis God's gift." 

Maltbie Babcock. 






May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



145 




Rural Life Sunday, May 25 



ON May 25, 1930, the Christian people 
of the world are asked to unite in a 
day of prayer to God for his bless- 
ings on the farmer and his fields and all 
those who may have to do with the rural 
life of the world. Rev. M. R. Zigler, Home 
Mission Secretary, is a member of the Com- 
mittee on Rural Life Sunday of the Home 
Missions Council. This committee has pub- 
lished a pamphlet (five cents a copy) which 
gives suggestions for the observance of the 
day. Among the suggestions are the fol- 
lowing : 

Devote one or more services of the day 
to sermons, hymns, Bible readings and 
prayers on rural life. Arrange appropriate 
programs for the church school and young 
people's meetings. 

Where there is more than one church in 
a " field," arrange a joint service for all 
churches in one church, with picnic dinner 
and suitable program. 



Secure special speakers for sermon or ad- 
dress, e. g., extension leaders, leaders of farm 
organizations, and specialists on rural life. 

Invite farm organizations to attend serv- 
ices in a body and perhaps take part in the 
services. 

Have a " pilgrimage " to some rural field, 
with program, speakers and picnic dinner. 

Present a play, pageant, or operetta on 
Rural Life in the parish hall or church. 

In his letter to the Home Missions Coun- 
cil approving the observance of the fifth 
Sunday after Easter as Rural Life Sunday, 
President Hoover said: "The blessing of 
Heaven to be invoked by Christian churches, 
of all creeds and in all lands, upon the 
farmer and his work, will comfort many with 
the knowledge that their burdens are in the 
anxious sympathetic thoughts of men of good 
will everywhere." 



For a number of years the young people 
and juniors of the Church of the Brethren 
have assumed definite missionary projects. 
We have been reminded by a number of 
leaders that a large number of young people, 
the intermediates, are really not included in 
either of these groups. We believe also that 
the intermediates in our Sunday-schools are 
able and willing to carry a definite mis- 
sionary project. Therefore, we are suggest- 
ing that the intermediates of the Church of 
the Brethren Sunday-schools assume as their 
missionary task the support of Vocational 
Training in our India Mission Schools. 

This program, including the vocational or 
industrial training of five mission stations, 
costs $6,000. 



Young India Learning to Work 

A Project for Intermediate Classes 

Ira W. Moomaw, who has been closely 
associated with the industrial work in India, 
writes concerning the need for vocational 
training and what it is accomplishing. 



VOCATIONAL TRAINING IN OUR MIS- 
SION SCHOOLS THE NEED 

Vocational training, or industrial training 
as we find it in our mission schools, repre- 
sents an effort to meet the wider needs of 
boys and girls who come to us from village 
homes. Their parents for the most part are 
farmers and the children upon leaving school 
usually reenter farm life. Almost from 
the beginning it was felt that if education is 
to touch the large rural areas of India deeply, 
the boys and girls while in school must 



146 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 

1930 



receive a close grip on the problems of rural 
life. So Industrial departments were opened 
in nearly all our mission schools. 

WHAT IT ACCOMPLISHES 

1. It helps to maintain a healthy school 
environment. Children in boarding schools 
are happier and healthier and the school 
discipline is better where several hours are 
spent in industrial work daily. In our sev- 
eral schools, farming, gardening, poultry 
husbandry, tailoring, carpentry and black- 
smithing are taught, although not all of these 
would be found in the same school. This 
gives the boys "chores" to do outside of 
school hours and tends to develop a sense of 
responsibility. The boys, whose task it is 
to care for the livestock, learn the value of 
work being done promptly and well. The 
school day is usually full of activity, a thing 
which growing boys need. Our doctors find 
that the boys who spend several hours of 
each day working out in the sun or in the 
school shop are healthier than those who do 
not. 

2. Industrial work in mission schools en- 
ables the students to earn a part of their 
school expense. The produce from the 
school gardens adds not a little to the food 
supply needed to maintain the large group of 
growing boys and girls. In some cases build- 
ings have been erected by the older boys who 
are in training as carpenters. In nearly 
every case the repairs on the mission and 
school property are done by the school boys. 
The tailoring students of one of our schools 
earn no small sum by making clothes for 



-the pupils of other schools. The output of 
the school work shops has nearly always 
reached an encouraging figure. ' The boys 
are usually glad for this chance to earn a 
part of their education, since their parents 
are generally too poor and often too disin- 
terested to help them much financially. 

We must not exaggerate the income that 
may be received in this way from industrial 
work. The fact is that the children are 
young while they are in school and much 
time and effort must be spent in teaching 
them to do things properly. Also as soon 
as they acquire the skill needed for economi- 
cal production, they are generally ready to 
leave school and start out for themselves. 
This, of course, is as it should be. A well 
ordered industrial school considers its teach- 
ing function Of first importance and would 
not neglect this for the sake of a larger 
income from production. 

3. Industrial training enriches the school 
curriculum. The purely academic courses 
offered in most government schools are not 
adapted to the needs of farm boys. Mission 
schools have done much pioneering in the 
field of industrial or vocational education. 
One happy result has been that agriculture, 
carpentry and similar occupations are now 
regarded in many government schools as 
valuable media of instruction. The teaching 
of these to farm boys especially, adds mean- 
ing to the academic subjects. As industrial 
training is worked out in our schools, each 
boy who is graduated knows a trade. A 
teacher completing the normal course has 




ANKLESVAR INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, 1929 



May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



147 



also a working knowledge of agriculture, 
carpentry and blacksmithing. This broader 
training is important. For if rural education 
is to become popular in India, it will likely 
become so by the efforts of teachers who 
have a sympathetic and intelligent attitude 
toward the life and problems of the men 
and women who toil. 

PLANNING THE PROJECT 

To get started, we suggest that the leader 
of the intermediate group, the teacher, the 
superintendent, or a member of the interme- 
diate Sunday-school class, call a meeting of 
the group and explain the project. It is 
best to set a goal towards which you will 
strive. However, since this is a new ex- 
perience and it will be difficult to know how 
much your group can raise, we are suggest- 
ing that you merely decide as a group to 
help support the industrial work, then do 
your best to carry your share. 

Leaflets explaining the project are avail- 
able for each member of your intermediate 
group. Send your order soon. 

EDUCATIONAL VALUE OF THE 
PROJECT 

Groups taking part in the project will be 
kept in touch with the industrial school work 
in our India mission. Stories written by 
missionaries, and students who have been 
helped, will appear in the Missionary Visitor. 
Also stories and pictures will be sent direct 
to the groups. In the early fall an exhibit 
of India industrial school work will be avail- 
able for use among groups interested in the 



project. Send the name of your leader in 
order that all materials may reach you 
promptly. - 

RAISING THE MONEY 

Some intermediate groups plan a budget 
covering the expected expenses for a year 
or six months. This plan is commendable 
and where it is used the amount to be raised 
for the missionary project will be determined 
and become a part of the budget. Many 
young people will tithe or set aside some 
definite portion of their earnings for the 
missionary project. This is the best method. 
Offerings may be brought weekly or monthly 
as the group decides. An Every Member 
Canvass to secure each person's pledge for 
the year would bring the need definitely to 
every member. 

Young people in rural communities may 
set out a field of grain. Several boys on an 
appointed day may prepare the ground for 
a field of corn. Working together they could 
plant and cultivate. The harvesting of the 
corn could easily be an enjoyable social event 
for the boys and girls, and the crop would 
bring financial profit. 

Raising live stock, working definite days 
for the project, doing odd jobs, candy mak- 
ing, and food sales, may furnish money for 
this task. 

This money should be sent to the Gen- 
eral Mission Board, Elgin, 111., designated for 
the Intermediate Missionary Project, Vo- 
cational Training in India. 



YOUNG INDIA LEARNING TO WORK 

Intermediate Missionary Project, 1930 



Date 



Congregation District 

Name of Leader 

Address 

Number of intermediates participating 

Goal (If one is set) 

(A sum of money for your project of work may be indicated here.) 

Be sure to send this report to General Mission Board, Elgin, 111., so you may receive all 
material issued to the intermediates taking part. 



148 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR WOMEN'S 

MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 
Based on " From Jerusalem to Jerusalem "* 

The Glorious Company, Chapter 4 

"Forget them not, O Christ, who stand Thy van- 
guard in the distant land." 

Devotions 

Hymn : " O Zion Haste " 

Scripture: Roll call of the saints, Heb. 11: 

32—12:2 
Prayer: Sentence prayers remembering our 

own missionaries and their work 
Solo: "Have Thine Own Way, Lord" 

Chapter Outline 

(Sermons are sometimes based on the life of some 
great man or woman. The minister doesn't say, 
" Now this is the moral: do thou likewise." So 
Mrs. Montgomery is giving us the story of the 
lives of early missionaries, hoping we can get some 
inspiration for our lives.) 

This chapter may be presented in a simple, 
conversational manner by eight or nine 
women. Since the chapter is a long one do. 
not try to give all the facts. 

1. Two Missionary Crusaders of the Middle 
Ages : Raymond Lull and St. Francis, pp 
112-115 

2. Two Arabs: Abdallah and Sabat, pp 116, 
119 

3. Henry Martyn, pp 119-124 

4. Bishop Crowther, pp 124-129 

5. King Khama, pp 130-135 

6. Eleanor Chesnut, Missionary Martyr, pp 
135-141 

7. Charlotte Tucker, pp 141-149 

8. Clara Swain, first woman medical mis- 
sionary, pp 149-158 

9. Choose a missionary of our cjiurch to add 
to the Glorious Company and ask some- 
one to impersonate the missionary. 

Poem: The Age of Gold. 

Prayer in unison. Page 194, second prayer. 

The Age of Gold 

The God that to the fathers 

Revealed his holy will 
Has not the world forsaken — 

He's with the children still. 
Then envy not the twilight 

That glimmered on their way; 
Look up and see the dawning, 

That broadens into day. 

'Twas but far off in vision, 
The fathers' eye could see 

The glory of the kingdom, 
The better time to be ; 



*Order from Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, 111. 
Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 50 cents. 



Today, we see fulfilling 
The dreams they dreamt of old; 

While nearer, ever nearer, 
Rolls on the age of gold. 

With trust in God's free spirit, 

The ever-broadening ray 
Of truth that shines to guide us 

Along our forward way, 
Let us today be faithful 

As were the brave of old ; 
Till we, their work completing, 

Bring in the age of gold. 

GETTING ACQUAINTED WITH OUR 
MISSION WORK 

Special Missionary Meeting 

Our large Sunday-school auditorium was 
curtained off into five rooms, one represent- 
ing each mission field. We used all the 
pictures, maps, posters and anything we 
could find on the country represented in 
that room. 

After our worship period we first went to 
Africa. Our Junior League leader had charge 
of that and gave some interesting informa- 
tion. We had planned to stay in each room 
only fifteen minutes, but in each one the 
women seemed so interested that it was 
hard to get them to move on. 

The next place to visit was China. We 
were fortunate to have Mrs. Seese (re- 
turned missionary) to have charge of that 
room. While she talked, rice was served to 
all. 

The next place was Sweden. A letter from 
Mrs. Norris and information received from 
the Mission Board office and from Year 
Books, gave us a very interesting history of 
the work in Sweden. Coffee and buns were 
served. 

Next we sailed to America. As the cur- 
tain was opened into that room, displaying 
a large flag, we sang " America." Most 
of the talk there was on the Greene County 
Industrial School. They had sent us a large 
display of their work and pictures. It looked 
like a bazaar. After the meeting two women 
(our own members) said they had never 
heard of that place. A teacher of junior 
girls told her class about the school and 
they are planning already to do something 
for the children there. While we talked 
and looked, nuts and mints were served. 

Then we assembled in front of the stage. 
Following a short history of our India mis- 



May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



149 



sion work, the pageant, " Mother India," 
was presented. After a duet, "A Little Bit of 
Love," a missionary offering of $40.00 was re- 
ceived. There were about fifty women 
present. The object of this meeting was to 
get better acquainted with our mission work 
and the missionaries, and I think this proved 
to be a most splendid way to do it. 

Mrs. P. E. Faw 

Chairman of Missionary Dept., Women's Work, 
Central Church, Roanoke, Va. 

BRETHREN MISSIONARY SOCIETY 
ORGANIZED 

A Brethren Missionary Society has re- 
cently been organized in York, Pa. The ob- 
ject of this society is to contribute to home 
and foreign missions, with greater activity 
on local work. They have held three meet- 
ings thus far, with an enrollment of 111. 
A spiritual program on missions is given 
first, followed by a business meeting. The 
meetings are held monthly in the Sunday- 
school rooms. The Missiongrams are read 
at these meetings. The missionary commit- 
tee feels that this is the proper place to use 
them as they fit in very well with the pro- 
grams. 

JUNIOR MISSIONARY PROJECT IN 
THE ROCK RUN CHURCH, NORTH- 
ERN INDIANA 

If you are a junior leader you will be in- 
terested in the plans for the Junior Mission- 
ary Project in the Rock Run Church, North- 
ern Indiana, as outlined in a letter from Mrs. 
Clarence R. Cripe. 

1. A large poster to present the project for 
1930. 



OUR 


1930 


PROJECT 


□ 


□ 


□ 


□ 


□ 


□ 


□ 




Names of 

Missionaries' 

Children 




□ 


□ 


□ 


□ 


□ 


D 


□ 


$100 


GOAL 


$100 



Pictures of junior missionaries " over 
there " will appear in the squares. (See 
Junior Department of the Missionary Vis- 
itor for pictures.) 

2. Each child to be given a mite-box, 
Cradle Roll — Cradles 

Beginners — Christmas Stockings 

Primaries — Barrels 

Juniors — Churches 

Intermediates — Star Coin Collectors 

3. A prize to be given to the class that 
raises the most money, the prize to be a 
picture for their class room. 

4. Story contest for primaries, juniors and 
intermediates. Subjects of the stories as 
follows : Primaries — How I Earned My Mis- 
sion Money; Juniors — Should Juniors Earn 
Their Own Mission Money? and Intermedi- 
ates — Why I Believe in Missions. A prize 
will be given to the author of the best story 
written in each class, the prize to be a book 
on missions. 

Rules of the contest are as follows : 1., 
Stories to contain 75 to 150 words. 2. Stories 
to be handed in by Dec. 15. 3. To be signed 
by number instead of name. 4. Three judges 
to be selected by Missionary Committee. 

Rules for judging: Fifty per cent for con- 
tent of story; twenty-five per cent choice of 
language; twenty-five per cent for neat- 
ness, correct spelling, and punctuation. 

5. Prizes to be awarded and the mite- 
boxes to be opened at Christmas time. 

A CORRECTION 

Three names were omitted from the list 
of Children of Missionaries, printed in the 
March issue of the Visitor, page 85. In 
China, Feme Luretta, Howard Edwin, and 
Alberta Kathryn Sollenberger, Ping Ting 
Chow, Shansi, ages 17, 13, and 8 respective- 
ly ; parents, O. C. and Hazel Sollenberger. 

Also, the ages of Magdalene and Elizabeth 
Long should be 17 and 14 respectively. 

At Pentecost all life, language, culture, 
national genius, art, science, philosophy — all 
life is gathered into a common center, 
Christ, and then it goes out from that com- 
mon center to tell, each in its own language, 
the wonderful words of God. 
Selected from "The Christ of Every Road" 
By E. Stanley Jones 



150 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



POSTER FOR B. Y. P. D. GROUPS 

" Young People Go Abroad," is the B. Y. 
P. D. Missionary Project for 1930. If your 
group has not already made plans to con- 
tribute to the work of some missionary, do 
so soon. Choose some missionary you know 
personally or are interested in, decide how 
much you will plan to give during the year, 
and plan definitely how to raise the money. 
Leaflets explaining the project in detail 
will be sent upon request. Address General 
Mission Board, Elgin, 111. A large poster 
with space for the picture of your mission- 
ary will be sent to each B. Y. P. D. taking 
part in the project. Also, a picture of the 
missionary chosen will be supplied. 

THIS PAMPHLET REALLY PRODUCES 
TITHERS 

A new, friendly, lively-worded tithing talk; 
"The Tithe Was Made for Man," present- 
ing the tithe idea so winsomely that the 
reader actually wants to accept it. 

No " legalism.'" No straining of proof 
texts. No unequal burden. No complicated 
theological argument. Just plain good 
sense. 

The price is 75 cents per 100. Copy free 
on request, to anybody interested in the 
circulation of tithing literature. With it 
comes a simple plan of distribution which 
can easily be operated in any church or 
other Christian group. 

This is part of the non-profit, interde- 
nominational service perpetuated by Thomas 
Kane, founder of The Layman Company, 
730 Rush Street, Chicago, 111. Send requests 
to this address. 

Please give your denomination, also men- 
tion the Missionary Visitor. 

A NEW LEAFLET, " HOW CHRIST IS 
CHANGING INDIA," is ready for distribu- 
tion. This article first appeared in " The 
Indian Witness," a periodical printed in 
India. An Indian, who has witnessed the 
effect of Christianity on his country during 
the last thirty-seven years, believes that 
" taken as a whole, India's people are daily 
growing in the knowledge of Jesus and India 
is being fashioned according to the mind 
and spirit of Jesus." Sent free upon request 
from General Mission Board, Elgin, 111. 



TWO PLAYS 

AMERICA FOR AMERICANS 

A Play for Juniors 

Are you looking for a play of world 
friendship and good will for boys and girls, 
easy to produce, with a lesson for grown-ups 
as well as children ? Here it is — "America 
for Americans." The play, which requires 
about fifteen minutes for presentation, may 
have eleven to eighteen characters. Four 
speaking parts. One of the girls, interested 
in America for Americans, wishes the for- 
eigners in America could be sent straight 
back where they belong, bag and baggage. 
Whereupon her ring is turned into a wish- 
ing ring and the baggage agent and his as- 
sistants proceed to remove from their home 
all articles which the foreigners had a 
part in making. When the room is nearly 
bare, and the American girls have been re- 
minded by an Indian that all foreigners in- 
cluding themselves are to leave America, in 
despair the girls wish they'd all come back, 
bag and baggage. They are brought back, 
but not until the girls have learned the 
meaning of "America, for Americans," and 
have promised to be perfectly lovely to for- 
eigners ever after. Price 15 cents each, 6 
copies for 75 cents. Order from Brethren 
Publishing House, Elgin, 111. 

A SEARCH FOR GOD 
A Play for Adults 

"A Search for God," is a short play, writ- 
ten by Alice K. Ebey, missionary to India. 
The play gives a true incident from our own 
India mission field. To be given by two 
adults, either men or women. Time, about 
ten minutes. Easy to produce. Sent free 
upon request. General Mission Board, El- 
gin, 111. 



The first Sunday of each month is 
Tithe Offering Sunday in the Umalla 
Vali Congregation, India, according to 
a plan adopted recently by the church 
in council. One-sixteenth of the 
month's income is brought in money, 
crops, or a promise to bring when 
crops are harvested. Read how the 
plan takes care of the tenth. See 
News from the Field, Page 143. 



May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



151 



"THE CHRIST OF EVERY ROAD" 
A BOOK REVIEW 

" The world-ground is being prepared, I 
am persuaded, for a spiritual awakening on 
a very extensive scale. I do not say this 
lightly— it is a growing conviction, forced 
upon me by the very facts." Such is the 
opening statement in " The Christ of Every 
Road," by E. Stanley Jones, a book that is 
going into thousands of homes of every 
denomination, because there is in it a ring- 
ing message of Pentecost, portraying what 
the church has done in the past and what 
the church may again do, if she will grasp 
her opportunity. 

The program of Jesus was not based on 
extraterritorial rights nor did the early dis- 
ciples first seek personal safety. Listen : 
" Jesus did not undertake to make Jerusalem 
a safe environment for their faith before 
he dared send the disciples into it. He 
changed them, and they went out to change 
the whole structure of human society. His 
method was a man." " So deeply had they 
imbibed this new method of facing life that 
as soon as a soldier became a follower of 
Christ in the early church he was expected 
to give up his occupation as incompatible 
with being a Christian. Their whole de- 
pendence on physical force was gone, swal- 
lowed up by a dependence on higher force — 
the force of unconquerable love." 

The Gospel is dynamic— it abounds in life. 
" Our gospel ends not in a corpse, but in 
a Conqueror ; not in a tomb, but in a 
triumph. And because of this very fact a 
radiant optimism lives at its heart. It is a 
gospel of in spite of. It does not depend 
on the the-account-ofs, for it can live on 
the in-spite-of's. And live radiantly." 

Jesus is Immanuel, " God with us." With 
us not occasionally, but always, though we 
live as if ignorant of this fact. " Even the 
Christ of the Emmaus Road is not sufficient, 
for while he is triumphant, he is still his- 
tory. He must become THE CHRIST OF 
EVERY ROAD, especially the Christ of 
those Inner Roads of Personal Life and 
Experience." 

Pentecost brought new life to the church. 
" The early church was spontaneous. No 
one knew what it was going to do next 
Now you can anticipate what the church 
will do. It is in the ruts, and 'a rut is a 



grave with both ends knocked out.' But 
ruts are so safe ! When life ceases to be 
spontaneous we groove it in order to be 
sure we have something. We do have some- 
thing, but whether it is life is a question." 
The book abounds in statements such as 
I have been quoting. It contains 271 pages 
and retails for $1.50. Through the Gish 
Fund, ministers of the Church of the Breth- 
ren may secure it for thirty-five cents. 
Order from Brethren Publishing House, 
Elgin, 111. 

J. E. Miller, 
Literary Editor, Brethren Publishing House. 

MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Conference Offering, 1930. As of March 31, 1930, 
the Conference (budget) offering for the year ending 
February 28, 1931, stands as follows: 
Cash received since March 1, 1930, $7,274.65 

(The 1930 budget of $311,000.00 is 2.3% raised, where- 
as it should be 8.3%.) 

Mission Board Treasury Statement. The following 
shows the condition of mission finances on March 31, 
1930: 

Income since March 1, 1930, $10,022.40 

Income same period last year, 35,987.36 

Expense since March 1, 1930, 24,700.84 

Expense same period last year, 21,987.50 

Mission surplus March 31, 1930 20,064.22 

Mission surplus February 28, 1930, 34,742.66 

Decrease in surplus. February, 1930, 14,678.44 

March Receipts. Contributions were received dur- 
ing March by funds as follows: 

Total Rec'd 
Receipts since 3-1-30 

World-Wide Missions $3,048.34 $3,048.34 

Student Fellowship Fund— 1929-1930 75.00 75.00 

Aid Societies Mission Fund— 1927 . . 435.35 435.35 

Home Missions 54.96 54.96 

Greene County, Virginia, Mission.. 10.00 10.00 

Foreign Missions 271.14 271.14 

Junior League— 1929 102.75 ' 102.75 

Junior League— 1930 61.83 61.83 

B. Y. P. D.— 1929 217.11 217.11 

Home Missions Share Plan 5.00 5.00 

Challenge Fund 355.00 355.00 

India Mission 52.00 52.00 

India Native Worker 5.00 5.00 

India Boarding School 26.25 26.25 

India Share Plan 137.50 137.50 

McCann Memorial Churchhouse 

(Anklesyar) 5.63 5.63 

India Missionary Supports 465.00 465.00 

China Mission 118.63 118.63 

China Share Plan 37.50 37.50 

Liao Chou Hospital 10.00 10.00 

China Missionary Supports 112.50 112.50 

Africa Missionary Supports 526.09 526.09 

Africa Mission 142.42 142.42 

Africa Share Plan 545.00 545.00 

General Relief 1.00 1.00 

China Famine Relief 1,351.57 1,351.57 

Conference Budget Donations 516.64 516.64 

Conference Budget Designated 20.00 20.00 

We read the story the other day in which 
it was told that Paavo, the great runner, al- 
ways prays before every race ; but we guess 
he gets right up off his knees and gets on his 
toes, which would be a good rule for all the 
rest of us to follow. — The Churchman. 



152 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



JUNIOR MISSIONARY 



Junior Missionaries in India 



Since the Junior Missionary Project this year 
is the support of children of missionaries, pic- 
tures of the children will appear each month 
in this department. The pictures may be used 
for posters. 




Dallas J. Winfield Fox 

Dallas J. Winfield Fox was born at Whitefish, 
Montana, May 5, 1917. Though he has been in 
India only a few months, he has found his' Indian 
playmates to be jolly good fellows. His favorite 
interests are animals, sports, and music, and he 
has always enjoyed following his daddy around 
Vhe wards and into surgery in the hospitals. He 
has brown hair, is four feet nine inches tall, and 
weighs 85 lbs. He plays the saxophone very well. 

David Emerson Blickenstaff was born May 20, 
1915, at La Verne, Calif. He has blue eyes and light 
hair, weighs 118 lbs. and is five feet four inches 
tall. He will enter Woodstock School, March, 1930, 



in eighth standard, equivalent to second year high 
school. 

During the winter season David has vacation from 
school. His favorite pastime, during vacation, is 
kite flying with the Indian boys, and he has a 
regular, daily program of study, shop work and 
violin practice. One of his hobbies is stamp col- 
lecting. He is also making a serious study of the 
Gujarati language and has a language teacher each 
day. 

Stephen Claire Blickenstaff was born at Lan- 
dour in the Himalaya Mountains, Sept. 11, 1924. 
He has blue eyes, light hair and is large for his 
age. He attended kindergarten in America at La 
Verne, Calif., and now he go6s' as a day pupil i'o 
the Boys' Boarding School at Bulsar. There he sits 
cross-leg on the floor with the little Indian boys 
and girls and studies his lessons in the Gujarati 
language. In addition he has lessons at home in 
English. When he gets to be a few years older 
he will be a boarder at Woodstock School. His 
playmates are the Indian children, with occasional 




David and Stephen Blickenstaff 



May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



153 



Irc'» M Iff H 


mHMjI 


^PPj 


'. ; Mm mi m 

P» ... > 








i^, -^ ^'~"~ 


i L 



Lois Anetta and Joseph Baxter Mow 



visits from other missionary children. Stephen loves 
to sing and enjoys music more than anything else. 
David Merrill Mow was 1 born on Christmas Day, 
1928, in Dahanu Hospital, India. His special interest 
is climbing up stairs, investigating everything he 
can reach, also tasting everything. He weighs 21 
lbs., has light brown hair and brown eyes. 

Lois Anetta Mow, six years old, has blue eyes, 
medium brown hair, weighs 46 lbs., and is three feet 
four inches in height. She is fond of playing house 
and cooking Indian fashion. Her playmates are 
Margaret Premchand, Samuel Jethalal and brother 
Joseph. Rice bananas and noodles are her favorite 
food. She was born April 23, 1924, at Dahanu, India. 

Joseph Baxter Mow, born in Landour Military 
Hospital, July 10, 1926, has blue eyes', yellow hair, 
weighs 32 lbs., and is three feet three inches tall. 
Joseph's special interest is motors. He enjoys 1 
playing with his wagon and riding the " kiddie 
car," cutting and pasting pictures and playing in 
the sand pile. Bread pudding and raw carrots are 
his favorite food. 




David Merrill Mow 



From New York to Bulsar 

EFFIE V. LONG* 



Come, children. We are to meet on Pier 
Seven in New York, and be "All aboard for 
India!" Yes, the name is on the side of the 
big steamer, the Lancastria. It is much 
larger than you thought? Yes, just like a 
whole village of people floating on the 
water. 

Now don't mind if you get sea-sick in 
an hour or two, for after it's all over, it 
is real funny, and something to laugh about 

* Missionary to India, now on furlough in America. 



ever after. But let's all think we're not 
going to be sea-sick, and perhaps we shall 
not be. I like a big steamer. It's more apt 
to be steady. 

Yes, these clean little rooms are our 
cabins, with the little beds — one above an- 
other, on the side, and little metal steps 
to climb up to the top berth or bed. When 
you lie down in one of these little beds you'll 
feel like singing " Rocked in the cradle of 
the deep " and it really does rock you to 
sleep so cosily. 



154 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



Out there is the Statue of Liberty. All 
boats going in and out of New York harbor 
pass this. It looks small, but it really is 
large, with winding steps inside to go up 
to look out over the Bay. 

Hear that gong? It's calling us to eat. 
They always call us to eat soon after start- 
ing out, and they keep it up, having good 
food for us four or five times per day. 

Now let's go out on deck and have some 
games — deck golf, deck tennis, shuffle board 
— anything to while away the time and make 
it pleasant. We can't all play. Some of 
you go to the piano and have some music. 
And on the lower deck is a swimming pool, 
filled with sea water. 

Now children, good night. Remember, we 
all gather here on this deck in the morning 
for worship. We'll have Bible study and 
prayer, and sing some hymns together. 

Oh, everybody is rushing to the railing! 
Land is in sight ! Sea-gulls have been fly- 
ing over the boat all morning. It is only 
an island, not England, as we had hoped. 
Now be sure to keep a strict lookout for 
a whale. I do hope we shall see one. I 
have crossed the Atlantic six times and 
have seen several. 

This is London, and so many things to 
see in a short while ! Our good friend, Mrs. 
Weber, is here and knows London well. 
She makes a fine guide for us. Take note 
of all you see here and write back home 
to the folks, for they will enjoy it. 

Our two days have seemed so short, but 
now we hear "All aboard" again, this time 
on the S. S. " City of Paris," bound for 
India. If you were sailing for Africa you 
would take a different steamer and go in 
a southeastern direction. But we must 
hurry on to India, and you may visit Africa 
later. If you hear the fog horns blowing 
tonight, don't be alarmed. We are in the 
Bay of Biscay and horns keep blowing so 
ships may not run against each other in the 
dense fog. 

Tomorrow we pass through the Strait of 
Gibraltar. It is not narrow as it looks on 
the map, but you can see land in the dis- 
tance on either side, and the Rock of 
Gibraltar stands up there tall and erect like 
a great sentinel. Be sure to get up early 
to see it. 

Oh, look, isn't that a whale? Yes, yes! 
Everybody runs to the railing ! Just see 
him over there spouting water. You do 
not see all of him? We never do. He 
shows only a part of his body above the 
water. 

Children, this afternoon we reach Alex- 
andria and northern Egypt, and tomorrow 
we may go down to Cairo to see the pyra- 
mids. How many want to go? Hands up. 
So we shall all go. 

Third class is awfully dirty and stuffy on 
these trains, but come on. We are off to 
the pyramids, your first camel-ride. See 
the sphynx ! So much larger than you 



thought ! And go up on top of the great 
pyramids. You have a guide to help you 
climb. The view is beautiful from there. 

Now children, here in Cairo I want you 
to see something in the museum before we 
take to our boat. I want you to see the 
mummies. They are the bodies of people 
who died thousands of years ago. They 
embalmed them, and kept them all these 
years. Don't they look old and dried up! 

At Port Said we must all buy topis, or 
sun-hats, made of cork, to protect our heads 
from the sun. 

Everybody on deck ! We are entering the 
Suez Canal. Yes, it looks like a big river. 
It is wide enough for two large steamers 
to pass, but steamers must go very slowly 
through the canal, so as not to wash the 
sides of the canal. It will take us all night 
to get through. Then we enter the Red Sea. 

We are going south now. Can't you feel 
it getting warmer every day? Yes, the Red 
Sea is not red. They say it was named from 
the great patches of red sea-weed that are 
seen sometimes. The little yellow stars we 
saw in the water last night — what are they? 
Why, that is phosphorescence. Just look 
down at the side of the boat, and you can 
sometimes see them twinkling. It is very 
pretty on a dark night. There are always 
so many interesting things to see on board 
ship. Yes, and I almost forgot to point 
Mount Sinai to you. If it is clear you can 
see it away over there to the left, and back 
there where we entered the Red Sea is 
where the children of Israel crossed. Do 
you know they have a railroad from Egypt 
to Palestine now? You can run up there 
in about a half day. 

Only six days to cross the Indian Ocean 
and we hope to land in Bombay and end 
our journey of a month's travel. Haven't 
we seen a lot? Bombay has a beautiful 
harbor, and they are taking us right into 
the " Gateway of India." 

See, the men are dressed in white and the 
women in red and bright colors ! Oh, there 
are our friends to meet us ! Since our time 
is so short, we'll go right on to Bulsar where 
our missionaries and their children are as- 
sembled in Mission Conference. There you 
can see them all. We have fifty-two mis- 
sionaries on the field and on furlough, and 
thirty-two children. All of them live at 
nine stations. Bulsar is our oldest station, 
opened by Brother and Sister Stover and 
Sister Ryan in 1895. Now take these chairs. 
Our Indian brethren have come to give you 
welcome. It is a pretty custom to " say it 
with flowers." They put garlands of flowers 
on your neck and bouquets in your hands, 
'and then ask you to talk! The flowers are 
so fragrant, you should be inspired to say 
something nice ! 

In a short time they may be doing it 
again, but that time it will be a farewell to 
you and you will be sailing away, away 
with a sad heart on leaving dear old India ! 






May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



155 



Tarabai, the Egg Seller 

MARY SHULL* 



" Tara, where are you, you lazy bones? 
Take these eggs to the Mem Saheb and see 
if she wants them. Be sure and tell her that 
they are fresh and take care that you do not 
break them." 

Tarabai very carefully tied the nine eggs 
in a cloth that once was red, but looked 
as if it had always been black. She picked 
her way very gingerly along the stony path 
till she came to the road that led to the 
Mission Bungalow. 

It was a hot day in April so the doors 
and windows were all shut. There seemed 
to be no one at home so she timidly began 
to call, "Mem Saheb, Mem Saheb, oh, Mem 
Saheb." 

At once the door opened and the Mem 
Saheb came out. "What have you, Bai?" 
" Eggs — they are fresh." 
" How many?" 
" Nine." 

"How many hens?" 
" One." 

" O, how can they all be fresh these hot 
days ?" 

"They are fresh.*' 

" We will put them in water and see. I 
am sorry but I can take only four of them. 
You will have to take the rest back." 
" Then I will have to eat a beating." 
"W T hy?" 

" My stepmother told me to bring them 
and if I take any back she will beat me." 
" Where do you live and what is your 
father's name?" 

" We live in the village here. My father 
is Ram Shet. He owns these fields around 
here and has many people working for him 
in them. My mother is dead and my step- 
mother is very cruel to me. She wears nice 
clothes and takes flowers to the temple 
every day, but I must stay at home and 
help the servants do the work." 
" What do you do?" 

" I must carry water every morning and 
evening from that big well near the bazaar. 
My stepmother will not allow me to bring 
from the one near our house because the 
low caste people go there." 



* Missionary to India. 



" How old are you and how many brothers 
and sisters do you have?" 

" I am ten years old and have two step- 
sisters and one stepbrother, the baby. My 
stepmother dresses up her little girls in fine 
clothes and takes them with her to the 
temple. But after they are gone I slip out 
and have some fun too. There are always 
people going to the bazaar and we like to 
watch some of the boys learn to ride bicy- 
cles. They can rent them for a few cents 
an hour and soon learn to ride them well, 
although they often tumble off. We like 
to watch the goats and buffaloes and cows 
come into the village from the jungle to 
go to their homes. At the time of our fes- 
tivals we have the most fun. We always 
have special sweets to eat and I never have 
to work so hard then. We go along with 
the other people when they march through 
the streets and sing songs." 

"Can you read?" 

" No, I see the girls go to school every 
day and wish I could go, but what can I 
do? My two little sisters will go when 
the} r get old enough. They are very bright, 
my stepmother says ; but I am dumb. I 
must go now or I will not get the rice 
cleaned for our dinner. Good-by, Mem 
Saheb." 

As she watched the retreating figure, the 
Mem Saheb marvelled at the joy these little 
folks get out of their hard lot. 

■ * -J* 

A LITTLE TASK 

I'm. very little, so they say; 
I dearly love to run and play. 
And yet I think it's pleasant, too, 
To have a little task to do. 

It makes me feel so big and strong, 
To know that I can help along; 
It makes me smile all through and through, 
To have a little task to do. 

I love to run, and shout, and sing, 
But then, that is not everything. 
I think it's very fine, don't you? 
To have a little task to do. 

"That life is most worth living whose work 
is most worth while." 



156 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



Chhota (Little ) Nagu 

SUSAN L. STONER* 



Old Nagu was dead! Faithful old Nagu 
who had been a most loyal helper at Wood- 
stock School for fifty years ! At the age 
of seventy-four he died from a sudden at- 
tack of pneumonia. Who could take his 
place in the school — yes, who would be able 
to take his place? 

The question must have reechoed far 
back into the Himalayan Mountains until it 
reached old Nagu's home. The bereaved 
wife, now a widow, was consoled only by 
the hope she placed in her one and only 
son, a young lad then ten years old. Was 
he too to be taken from her home? Her 
mother heart must have weighed the ques- 
tion thoughtfully until she was ready to 
consent that her "gem" or "jewel," Ratan 
Singh, should go along with his father's 
friends to Woodstock School. There he 
would begin to learn the duties that his 
father had recently laid down. 

It may have been hard to leave his mother, 
his two older sisters, and village playmates, 
but Ratan Singh had a brave little heart. 
He was true to the daring blood that was 
in him for he belonged to a Rajput family 
of the warrior caste. It did not take long 
to make a little bundle of the simple pro- 
visions of food and clothing and he was 
ready to start. His father's friends were 
like kind uncles to him. 

After nearly three days of trudging along 
over mountain roads, Ratan Singh found 
himself in a strange environment, not at 
all like his quiet little village. Here he 
saw many white-faced boys and girls play- 
ing about on the school playground and 
speaking a language that he did not under- 
stand. Perhaps he felt a bit homesick for 
his own village friends. Presently he was 
taken to the school office where he met 
the " bara sahib " or principal, Mr. Parker. 

Day by day he began to get acquainted 
with the Landour hillside as he went on 
errands for the office. , He soon became 
known around the school as " Chhota Nagu " 
meaning " little Nagu." His pleasant smile 
and cheery " Salaam " have won him many 
friends. 

Chhota Nagu arises early in the morning 



and follows the practice of the older Hindus, 
with a worship period, reading from the 
Hindu scriptures and chanting prayers. 




Teacher in the Woodstock School, India, where 
our missionaries' children attend. 



CHHOTA NAGU follows in the foot- 
steps of his father. 



After a light breakfast, mainly tea, he is 
ready for the day's work. Early each school 
day he unlocks and dusts several classrooms. 
He loves to imitate his elders and carries a 
" jharon " or towel over his shoulder. In- 
stead of wiping the dust from the desks and 
seats with a dampened cloth, he switches 
this jharon in the air and rather beats the 
dust off the furniture. With such a meth- 
od of dusting, about half of the dust 
rises into the air and settles upon the dusted 
furniture again. (It is hard to change the 
custom of ages !) This same jharon may be 
used as a handkerchief, a hand towel, or 
shopping bag. A most useful article is the 
jharon, and no doubt Chhota Nagu would 
feel lost without his jharon swung over his 
shoulder in readiness for its many services. 

During the past year he has had a. 

" paghree " made of yards and yards of soft 

white cloth neatly folded and wound around 

to form a turban for his head. He wears 

'Continued on Page 158) 



May 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



157 



Missionary Worship Programs for Juniors 



To be used in connection with the 
Junior Missionary Project, May 

Quiet Music 

Call to Worship: (Stand and sing) "The 
Lord is in his holy temple, Let all the 
earth keep silence, keep silence, before 
him. Amen." 

Praise Hymn: "Come Thou Almighty King" 
(Two stanzas) 

Scripture : Psalm 72 : 17, followed by Psalm 
23 in unison. 

Hymn : " We've a Story to Tell to the Na- 
tions " 

Facts about India 

Story : " Tarabai, the Egg Seller " 

Offering. Discuss with the children the 
object of the offering. 

Sentence Prayers by the Children. (Prayers 
appropriate to be cut apart will be sent 
upon request.) Close the prayers with the 
following (Tune: "Away in a Manger"): 

Be near me, Lord Jesus, 

I ask thee to stay, 
Close by me forever, 

And love me I pray. 
Bless all the dear children, 

In thy tender care, 
And help us to love thee, 

And willingly share. 



To be used in connection with the 
Junior Missionary Project, June 

Quiet Music 
Call to Worship 

Leader : The earth is Jehovah's and the 
fulness thereof; the world and they that 
dwell therein. 
Children : Let the people praise thee, O 
God; Let all the people praise thee. 
Praise Hymn : " Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord . 

God Almighty " (Two stanzas) 
Lord's Prayer in unison 
Story of hymn : " I Would Be True " 
Hymn: "I Would Be True" 
Brief talk by the leader calling attention to 
the missionary project, the children's part 
in the missionary program of the church, 
and methods of raising their missionary 
money. 
Story : " Chhota (Little) Nagu " 
Offering Service 

Leader : " Give unto the Lord the glory 
due unto his name; bring an offering 
and come into his courts." 
Boys : " God loveth a cheerful giver." 
Girls : " It is more blessed to give than 

to receive." 
Prayer : 

" Dear Jesus, bless the money we bring thee, 
Give it something sweet to do, 
May it help some one to love thee. 
Jesus, may we love thee too." 



Story of Hymn, " I Would Be True " 



" Howard Arnold Walter, a noble and 
unselfish missionary, was devoted to his 
mother. After several years of faithful serv- 
ice in a far-away land, the time had come 
for him to return home for a much needed 
rest, and he was rejoicing over the prospect 
of seeing his mother and other loved ones 
again. Then a terrible plague broke out 
in the community in which he was serving, 
and all about him there was suffering and 
sorrow. Seeing the sadness and misery of 
the people, Mr. Walter felt that he ought 
not to leave them at a time when he might 
tell to many who were ill the story of a 
God who loved them, and when he might 
also care for many of them and help them 
to get well. And so, forgetting his own 



pleasure, the noble fellow made up his mind 
to remain among those suffering people and 
to help them in every way he could. As 
he thought of how disappointed his mother 
would feel, he wrote her a very beautiful 
letter, telling her how much those poor, 
suffering people needed him, and then he 
wrote for her the lines, ' I Would Be True.' 
" Wearied by the added work of caring for 
the sick, and worn by the sadness all about 
him, Mr. Walter himself became ill with 
the frightful plague and died among the 
people for whom he had so bravely lived 
and sacrificed. And the beautiful lines which 
that young man sent home to his mother 
have been set to music," 



158 



The Missionary Visitor 



May 
1930 



Facts About India 



One-fifth of the population of the world, 
or three times the population of the United 
States, live in India. India is half as large 
as the United States. 

There are tens of millions of child widows 
in India. It has been said that there are 
enough child widows in India to put one in 
every home in America and enough left to 
make a city of Chicago besides. A survey 
of a few years ago reveals that approxi- 
mately 15,000 of these widows are under five 
years of age; 100,000 between five and ten 
years of age; 279,000 between ten and fif- 
teen ; and a half million between fifteen and 
twenty. The Sarda Bill, which was to be- 
come a law in India April 1, 1930, will pro- 
hibit the marriage of girls under fourteen 
years of age and boys under eighteen. No 
doubt Christian missions was largely re- 
sponsible for this reform. 



The first missionaries from the Church of 
the Brethren went to India m 1894. They 
were Wilbur Stover and wife and Mrs. 
Bertha Ryan Shirk. 

The Church of the Brethren mission in 
India is located between the Arabian Sea and 
the Western Ghats (mountains), an area of 
7,000 square miles, with a population of 1,- 
185,000. Our mission is responsible for 2,- 
865 villages. 

We have 52 American missionaries to In- 
dia. Fifteen of this number are now on 
furlough in America. 

Last year there were fourteen organized 
churches with a membership of 3,892. 

In the nine mission schools the total en- 
rollment was 3,789. 

Total treatments last year in our two mis- 
sion hospitals and dispensaries, 16,753. 




ENTHUSIASTIC JUNIOR MISSIONARIES of the Summit Congregation, Second Dis- 
trict of Virginia. 



CHHOTA (LITTLE) NAGU 

(Continued from Page 156) 

this more often now than the black topi or 
cap as seen in the picture. Going to the 
office about nine o'clock and quietly remov- 
ing his shoes as a sign of respect, he sits 
on the stone pavement to await further 
orders of the day. At spare moments he 
studies his Third Reader in Hindu. 

Chhota Nagu does not go to school. He 
is being taught by a high school boy. 



Does he play games? He does not get 
much chance at playing games with boys 
of his own age. His older friends like him 
and play with him sometimes. Perhaps he 
misses the care-free life he had in his home 
village. 

At school he seems to take life rather 
seriously for one of his age. He is honest 
and loyal. The teachers and pupils like him 
and wish him many years of service in the 
school as he follows in the footsteps of his 
father — the faithful old Nagu. 



Church of the Brethren Missionaries 

Supported in Whole or in Part by Funds Administered by the General Mission Board 
With the Year They Entered Service 



AMERICA 

Church of the Brethren In- 
dustrial School, Geer, Va. 

Bollinger, Amsey, and Flor- 
ence, 1922 

Finckh, Elsie, 1925 

Hersch, Orville, and Mabel, 
1925 

Kline, Alvin, and Edna, 1919 

Knight, Henry, March, Va., 
1928 

Wampler, Nelie, 1922 

In Pastoral Service 

Bowman, Price, and Elsie, 
Bassett, Va., 1925 

Eby, E. H., and Emma, 2923 
St. Joseph Ave., St. Jo- 
seph, Mo., 1927 

Weiss, Lorell, 1188 Missouri 
Ave., Portland, Ore., 1927 

Haney, R. A., and Irva, 
Lonaconing, Md., 1925 

Rohrer, Ferdie, and Pearl, 
Jefferson, N. C, 1927 

Ziegler, Edward, and Ilda, 
405 E. Eleventh Ave., John- 
son City, Tenn., 1923 

Barr, Francis, and Cora, Al- 
bany, Ore., 1928 

In Evangelistic Service 

Smith, Rev., and Mrs. S. Z., 
Sidney, Ohio 

SWEDEN 

Graybill, J. F., and Alice, 

Bergsgatan 45, M a 1 m 6, 

Sweden, 1911 
Norris, Glen M., and Lois, 

Spangatan, 3 8, M a 1 m 6, 

Sweden, 1929 

On Furlough 

Buckingham, I d a, Oakley, 
111., 1913 

CHINA 
Liao Chow, Shansi, China 
Hutchison, Anna, 1911 
Oberholtzer, I. E., a n d 

Elizabeth, 1916 
Pollock, Myrtle, 1917 
Senger, Nettie M., 1916 
Shock, Laura J., 1916 
Ulery, Ruth F., 1926 
Wampler, Ernest M., 1918, 

and Elizabeth, 1922 

Ping Ting Chow, Shansi, China 

Bright, J. Homer, and Min- 
nie, 1911 
Crumpacker, F. H., and Anna, 

1908 
Flory, Byron M., and Nora, 

1917 
Flory, Edna R., 1917 
Horning, Emma, 1908 
Metzger, Minerva, 1910 * 
Schaeffer, Mary, 1917 
Sollenberger, O. C, and 
Hazel, 1919 



Chow Yang, Shansi, China 

Clapper, V. Grace, 1917 

Cripe, Winnie, 1911 

Heisey, Walter J., and Sue, 
1917 

Neher, Minneva J., 1924 • 

Smith, W. Harlan, and Fran- 
ces, 1919 

Tai Yuan Fu, care of Y. M. 
C. A., Shansi, China 

Ikenberry, E. L., and Olivia, 

1922 
Myers, Minor M., and Sara, 

1919 

On Furlough 

* Brubaker, L. S., and Marie. 
331 S. 3d. Covina, Calif., 1924 



AFRICA 

Garkida, Nigeria, West Africa, 
via Jos 

Beahm, Wm. M., and Esther, 

1924 
Harper, Clara, 1926 
Heckman, Clarence C, and 

Lucile, 1924 
Robertson, Dr. Russell L., 

and Bertha C, 1927 
Shisler. Sara. 1926 

Lassa, via Maiduguri, Nigeria, 
West Africa 

Kulp. H. Stover, 1922, and 

Christina, 1927 
Rupel, Paul, and Naomi, 1929 
Schechter, Elnora, 1929 

On Furlough 

* Burke, Dr. Homer L., and 
Marguerite, 6317 Grand 
Ave., Chicago, 111., 1923 

Gibbel, Dr. J. Paul, and 
Verda, Girard, 111., 1926 

Helser, Albert D., 1922, and 
Lola, Thornville, Ohio, 1923 



INDIA 

Ahwa, Dangs, Surat Dist., 
India 

Garner, H. P., and Kathryn, 

1916 
Royer, B. Mary, 1913 

Anklesvar, Broach Dist., India 

Grisso, Lillian, 1917 

Lichty, D. J., 1902, and Anna 

1912 
Miller, Sadie J., 1903 

Bulsar, Surat Dist., India 

Blickenstaff. Lynn A., and 

Mary, 1920 ' 
Blough, J. M., and Anna, 

1903 



G 



Cottrell, Dr. A. R., and 

Laura, 1913 
Fox, Dr. J. W., and Besse, 

1929 
Mohler, Jennie, 1916 
' Shumaker, Ida C, 1910 

Dahanu Read, Thana Dist., 
India 

Blickenstaff, Verna M., 1919 
Ebbert, Ella, 1917 
Metzger, Dr. Ida, 1925 

Jalalpor, Surat Dist., India 

Miller, Eliza B., 1900 

Vada, Thana Dist., India 

Brumbaugh, Anna B., 1919 
Ebey, Adam, and Alice, 1900 
Shufl, Chalmer, and Mary, 
1919 

Palghar, Thana Dist., India 

Alley, Howard L., and Hat- 
tie, 1917 

Umalla, Brooch Dist., India 

Miller. Arthur S. B., and 

Jennie. 1919 
Widdowson, Olive, 1912 
Ziegler, Kathryn, 1908 

Vyara, via Surat, India 

Brooks, Harlan J., and Ruth, 

1924 
Wagoner, J. E., and Ellen, 
1919 
Mow, Anetta, 1917 

Burjor Bag, Lunsikui, Nav- 
sari, India 

Mow. Baxter M., and Anna, 
1923 

Woodstock School, Landour 
Mussoorie, U. P., India 

Stoner, Susan L-, 1927 



On Furlough 

Kaylor, John I., ,1911, and 
Ina, 1515 Second St., Bak- 
ersfield, Calif., 1921 

Long, I. S., and Efhe, Bridge- 
water, Va., 1903 

Moomaw, I. W.. and Mabel, 
R. 3, Canton, Ohio, 1923 

Nickey, Dr. Barbara M_ 
3435 Van Buren St., Chi- 
cago, 111., 1915 

Roop, Ethel, 1926 

Shickel, Elsie N.,22ll Orange 
Ave. N. W., Roanoke, Va., 
1921 

Swartz, Goldie E., R. 2, 
Ashland, Ohio, 1916 

Wolf, L. Mae, 3435 Van 
Buren St., Chicago, 111., 1922 

Woods, B e u 1 a h, Spencer, 
Ohio, 1924 



* Otherwise employed in America until conditions permit return to the field. 



Please Notice.— Postage on letters to our missionaries is 5c for each ounce or fraction 
thereof and 3c for each additional ounce or fraction. 



MAY IS CONFERENCE OFFERING MONTH 

At the Missionary Convocation on Monday, June 16, new missionaries will be con- 
secrated and sent forth to their tasks. An appeal for funds will be made. As many as 
thirty ushers will pass among the heart-warmed assembly and receive the offerings 
sent up from the congregations, as well as personal gifts. People will be inquisitive until 
the money is counted. Great rejoicing will follow a good report. The Messenger will 
publish the achievement. You will enjoy having a part in this great work. 

CONFERENCE OFFERING 

BLANK FOR SENDING MONEY 

Brethren's General Mission Board, Elgin, 111. Note— The treasurer of the General 

, Mission Board is also the treasurer 

Dear Brethren: for Conference Budget funds. 

Enclosed find Dollars 

as an offering for Missions and Church Promotion to carry out the program as 
authorized by Annual Conference. 

CONFERENCE BUDGET for Missions and Church Promotion $ 

General Mission Board, World Wide Fund * - - - $ 

Board of Religious Education - - - - - $ 



General Ministerial Board 
General Education Board 
American Bible Society 
Which amount is from: 



Individual 

Sunday-school Class 

.Christian Workers 

..B. Y. P. D. 

, Aid Society 

Junior Church League 
Sunday-school 



CONGREGATION 
STATE DISTRICT 



Name of Sender 



Street Address or R. F. D. 
Postoffice 



State 



Please do not write in this space 




A Few Reminders 

Please make all orders payable to Breth- 
ren's General Mission Board and to no in- 
dividual. 

Money should be sent in Bank Draft, per- 
sonal check, Postoffice or Express Money 
Order. 

Please show what congregation and Dis- 
trict should have credit for this. This is for 
the Record of Giving. 

Full name and address should be given to 
insure a prompt return of receipt. 

Orders for tracts, Visitor subscriptions, 
etc., should be on separate sheet. 



? .Missionary Visitor 

PRESENTING 

CHURCH of tKeBRETHEKS 

Missie: 




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(JUNE, 1930 



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EDITOR'S ANNOUNCEMENT 

For forty-five years the General Mission Board has made an annual report. 
Often these reports were very similar to those of the year before. To effect 
economy the reports were reduced in size, with the understanding that every five 
years a more complete report would be issued. We take pleasure in presenting this 
first of the five-year reports. It is more than a five-year report as it includes in- 
formation collected from earlier years. 

Seven sections of the book present the various phases of our mission work. 
The section, LIFE STORIES WITH MISSIONARIES, will be found exceptional- 
ly interesting for popular reading. Families will enjoy reading one of the visits 
each day in connection with family worship. 

The statistical tables are a storehouse of information. Save your copy for 
reference during the next five years. Copies should be placed in Sunday-school 
libraries so they will be available for various uses. 

The report contains so much valuable material that we recommend its use for 
mission study. A series of lessons based on it will be prepared and printed in The 
Missionary Visitor, August, 1930. 

The editor wishes to thank all of the missionaries who have cooperated so won- 
derfully in supplying the material for this good report. Never before has the home 
church had such an opportunity to know the facts regarding its mission work. 

Appreciative mention is also due the assistant editor who took a leading part 
in the make up of this issue. Readers accustomed to think of the assistant editor 
as Miss Ada Miller will see her name in this issue as Mrs. Ada (Miller) Arnold. 
We congratulate both Brother and Sister Arnold. She has consented to continue 
her work with the Visitor. 



THE MISSIONARY VISITOR 

Published Monthly by the Church of the Brethren through her General Mission Board. 

H. Spenser Minnich, Editor 
Mrs. Ada (Miller) Arnold, Assistant Editor 



SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS $1.00 PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH dona- 
tion of four dollars or more to the General Mission 
Board, either direct or through any congregational 
collection, provided the four dollars or more are given 
by one individual and in no way combined with 
another's gift. Different members of the same family 
may each give four dollars or more and extra sub- 
scriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent 
to persons who they know will be interested in read- 
ing the Visitor. NO VISITOR SUBSCRIPTIONS 
ARE ENTERED UNLESS REQUESTED. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription 
terms do not include a subscription for every four 
dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation 
of four dollars or more, no matter how large the 
donation. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions 
and make remittances payable to GENERAL MIS- 
SION BOARD, 22 S. STATE ST., ELGIN, ILL. 

Entered as second class matter at the postoffice at 
Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 



Membership 

OTHO WINGER, North Manchester, Ind., 1912-1933. 

J. J. YODER, McPherson, Kans., 1908-1934. 

H. H. NYE, Elizabethtown, Pa., 1923-1932. 

J. B. EMMERT, La Verne, Calif., 1924-1931. 

LEVI GARST, Salem, Va., R. R. 1, 1925-1930. 

J. K. MILLER, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 1928-1933. 

L. C. MOOMAW, Roanoke, Va., R. R. 2, 1928-1932. 

Officers 

OTHO WINGER, President, 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, Vice-President, 1908-1934. 
CHARLES D. BONSACK, General Secretary, 1921.* 
H. SPENSER MINNICH, Assistant Secretary and 

Editor Missionary Visitor. 1918. 
M. R. ZIGLER, Home Mission Secretary, 1919. 
CLYDE M. CULP, Treasurer, 1920. 



Note.— The bold type date indicates the year when 
Board Members were first elected, the other date the 
year when Board Members' terms expire. 

* Although Bro. Bonsack was not elected secretary 
until 1921 he has been connected with the Board 
since 1906. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



161 



mmmm 



Viewing Our Mission 
Situation 

CHAS. D. BONSACK 



Forty-fifth Annual Report of the General 
Mission Board 

For the Fiscal Year Ending February 28, 1930 



WE are glad to report a good year 
in the mission endeavor of the 
church. The shortage of funds 
made necessary a reduction of work in all 
fields. This meant delayed buildings, em- 
ployed native workers dismissed from serv- 
ice, and over-worked missionaries broken in 
health. Yet the Lord has spared the lives 
of all workers and sustained their efforts 
with normal fruitage in all fields. The June 
Missionary Visitor becomes a report this 
year for the past five years, and to this 
we refer all for further details of progress. 

Personnel 

During the year seven new workers were 
sent to fields beyond America. These were 
Brother Glen Norris and wife, Lois Detweiler 
Norris, to Malmo, Sweden. Dr. J. W. Fox 
and wife, Bessie King Fox, to India. Broth- 
er Paul Rupel and wife, Naomi Zigler Rupel, 
with Elnora Schechter, a registered nurse, 
to Africa. This made a total of 107 foreign 
missionaries under the care of the Board, 
which is about eighteen less than four years 
ago. We take pleasure in this special report 
of our fields in presenting the pictures of 
those who represent us in foreign lands. 

There continued about 25 workers in the 
home field during the year, wholly or par- 
tially supported by the Board. Among 
these, Brother S. Z. Smith, who did some 
splendid evangelistic work among the weak- 
er churches for the full year included in 
this report, recently passed to his reward 



while holding a meeting in Lonaconing, 
Maryland, April 4. 

India 

India reports a baptized membership of 
3,944, something over 200 being baptized 
during the year. They have fifteen or more 
organized churches and these churches are 
more and more accepting the responsibility 
of evangelism among their people. Mis- 
sionaries are needed who can work with 
these churches, helping to train leaders, 
building Christian faith and character, and 
directing to better health, homes and Chris- 
tian progress. The Board spent as a total 
for India during the year, $125,910.00. This 
was used to support fifty-two missionaries, 
about 225 native teachers and evangelists, 
provide buildings, give medical treatment to 
more than 28,000 sick folk and other min- 
istries of help in Christ's name. In India, 
as everywhere, Christian progress is not 
measured by baptisms alone. The Gospel 
touches all of life. 

China 

China continues to suffer from political 
wars to which famine has added a death 
list the past year of many millions. Perhaps 
no land needs help more urgently and yet 
at the same time increases the difficulty for 
giving it. Our mission there reports a 
baptized membership of 1,255, more than 50 
being baptized during the year. The gov- 
ernment has made it very difficult to con- 
tinue mission schools by prohibiting religious 



162 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



teaching in schools of any kind, yet more 
than 630 were in schools of some kind, not 
including the Sunday schools. We have 32 
missionaries in China and about 43 native 
workers. During the year a total of $49,- 
626.00 was spent in this field to support 
these workers, provide buildings, minister to 
womanhood and childhood, and give medical 
treatment to more than 6,000 patients. The 
Chinese church and its leaders are assuming 
increasing responsibilities. There was re- 
ceived for fees at the hospitals, $13,500 
Mex. and the women's sewing work provided 
enough money to carry on the evangelistic 
work at three stations. 

Africa 
Our Africa field is one of large opportu- 
nity and the mission is filling a great need. 
Interior and beyond all mission stations of 
any kind, millions await the coming of the 
white man with the gospel. The govern- 
ment has prohibited missions from entering 
much of this territory, but the British gov- 
ernment, seeing the good work done by the 
mission, has in the past year invited us to 
occupy more of this closed area. Nigeria, 
having a greater percentage of lepers than 
any other country in the world, offers a 
large opportunity to help and heal these 
sufferers. Already about fifty are receiving 
treatments. Government has given land for 
this and provides money for their living, 
while the mission ministers to their spiritual 
needs. The leper association of London 
provides medicine and the American Mission 
for Lepers is making a liberal appropriation. 
Eighteen missionaries are assigned to Africa. 
Last year the Board spent $30,329.00 in sup- 
porting this work. About fifty have been 
baptized, and three times as many have 
made a covenant of faith and are under 
regular instruction. Perhaps no field offers 
a more challenging need for Christian serv- 
ice, especially in medical help and practical 
school work. 



Scandinavia 

The work in Scandinavia is much like 
work in the homeland. It consists mostly 
of pastoring and supervising the churches 
established there by our fathers. A good 
work has been done and opportunities still 
urge us to the work. The increase is slow 
since the members move to America almost 
as rapidly as the church increases. 

Home Field 

About fifty congregations in the home 
land received financial help from the Board. 
This, with the helpful supervision of the 
Home Secretary, has strengthened many 
weak churches and helped many otherwise 
discouraged young ministers who toil in 
these difficult fields. The gains in member- 
ship in these churches by letter and baptism 
totalled 583. Net gains, 341. A splendid 
result. The money investment in this work 
for all purposes was $35,195.00. This in- 
cluded help to District Boards, pastors, 
summer pastors, Greene County Industrial 
School, administration and other help. The 
gains in membership alone exceeded in per- 
centage of increase those of the older estab- 
lished churches, either on the basis of the 
dollar invested or per capita of population. 
This work could easily be increased with 
profit. 

General 

Our purpose at all times is to do the most 
we can with available resources. In every 
field we are urging more and more towards 
self support. Nobody will take much in- 
terest in a work that has cost him noth- 
ing. Neither can a work remain Christian 
unless it shares enthusiastically with the 
bitter needs of mankind. It is therefore our 
hope to increase the intensiveness of our 
work by decreasing its cost. On the other 
hand, it is our feeling that with the burning 
needs among the backward people and 
places, the church will serve its Master and 



The Board 


carries on a 


program 


of work w 


diich is repre 


sented by the 


following fig- 


ures : 






Expendi- 
tures year 


Expendi- 
tures year 








Field 


Mission- 


ending 


ending 


Pop. in area 


Native church 




Opened 


aries 


Feb. 1930 


Feb. 1929 


assigned to us 


membership 


Africa 


1922 


17 


$ 30,329 


$ 40,288 


200,000 


30 


China 


1908 


32 


49,626 


52,129 


1% million 


1255 


India 


1894 


50 


125,910 


135,351 


\ Y /^ million 


3944 


Scandinavia . . . 


1876 


4 


9,147 


9,109 




237 


Home Missions 






35,195 


39,854 


U. S. 





June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



163 



generation best by sharing its life and hope 
with those so much in need of Christ. 

Financial 

One of the great events in the last decade 
of missions was the generous and co- 
operative spirit in which the churches met 
the challenge of a few of our laymen to 
wipe out the deficit. To these men and the 
churches the cause of missions is indebted 
for the fine financial report which follows. 
As a result of this giving, the churches in- 
creased their giving over a year ago more 
than $87,000.00. Income from other sources 
also increased about $24,000.00. 

It will also be seen that our expenditures 
were $26,000.00 less than last year and almost 
one hundred thousand less than two years 
ago. So far as this is practical economy it 
must be encouraged and continued. It is 
the purpose of the Board to keep the pro- 
gram within the giving of the churches. 
Whether we should continue to reduce our 
giving to missions in the face of world needs 
and our own wealth and progress is for 
the church and Conference to decide. 
The Cost Per Missionary 

A missionary's personal support costs about 
$1.50 per day. The expenses connected with 
each missionary's work are about $5.50 per 
day. Seven dollars will completely cover a 
missionary's personal pay and his work ex- 
pense for a day. Givers should be led to 
think in terms of the number of days they 
can support a missionary they may know. 
Most missionaries have their personal sup- 
ports already provided but the work budgets 
all need additional money. 

Comparative Statement of Mission Funds 
Receipts 

Contributions of living 
donors $240,667.94 $327,613.49 $ 86,945.55 

Bequests and lapsed an- 
nuities, net income 
from investments, etc. 57,355.10 82,160.32 24,805 22 

$298,023.04 $409,773.81 $111,750.77 
Endowments and annu- 
ities 29,969.76 65,324.92 35,355.16 

Relief donations 2,098.00 4,192.64 2,094.64 

Expenditures 

Administration $13,716.64$ 9,832.31$ 3,884.33* 

Missionary education.. 12,542.26 14,617.14 2,074.88 

India Mission 133,351.20 125,910.01 7,441.19* 

China Mission 52,129.53 49.626.03 2,502.60* 

Sweden Mission 8,921.66 8,970.65 48.99 

Denmark Mission 187.75 177.74 10.01* 

Africa Mission 40,286.81 30,329.10 9,957.71* 

Home Missions 39,854.02 35,195.80 4,658.22* 

$300,989.87 $274,659.68 $ 26,330.19* 

'Decrease 



The Missionary Dollar 




The distribution of the funds in the hands 
of the Board to the various fields are shown 
in the foregoing comparative statements, as 
well as comparison with last year. It also 
shows the amount used in administration 
which was 3.58% of the missionary dollar. 
Including the Missionary Visitor and Mis- 
sionary education the percentage becomes 
8.9%. 

General Comments 

It is gratifying to comment on the fore- 
going statement. It reflects the results of 
one of the most successful years in finance 
realization since the beginning of our mis- 
sion enterprise in 1884. A more than 35% 
increase in giving from the churches, ma- 
terialized largely in the last few weeks of 
the fiscal year. The challenge to the church 
of some consecrated laymen seems to have 
started a movement to wipe out the deficit 
that knew hardly any limits. While the 
challenge project proposed wiping out a 
$75,000.00 deficit, the result at the end 
showed this accomplished with cash and 
underwritings extra giving an actual surplus 
of more than $50,000.00. This, however, is 
no basis for unwarranted expansion in the 
future, neither for curtailment of giving 
from the brotherhood as there are serious 
responsibilities because of the many workers, 
commissioned by the church, now in various 
fields. 

The increase in receipts from outside 
sources is noted notwithstanding a compara- 



164 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 

1930 



tively small sum from the Publishing House 
in this year. Unusual amounts from be- 
quests and improved earnings from endow- 
ment investments reflect in this increase. 
Appreciative acknowledgment is here made 
of transfer to our deficit from the Board of 
Religious Education of $5,000.00 of its sur- 
plus. 

It is significant that endowment and an- 
nuities as well as relief receipts increased 
about 100% over the previous year. 

An important factor in helping out the 
deficit situation was curtailment of work 
and in economies which is shown in the 
decrease in expense for the year. The de- 
crease in administration expense is by com- 
parison only as it represents about the ex- 
pense of the deputation to Africa of the 
previous year. Naturally missionary educa- 
tion would show an increase because the 
special challenge effort rested largely in this 
department, requiring extra printing, mail- 
ing, and help. In India the cut was effective 
in operating expense about $4,000.00, in 
building program about $8,000.00, but offset 
partly in increased expense returning fur- 
loughed workers, about $5,000.00. The cut 
of about $4,000.00 in China operating ex- 
pense, as well as some profit from exchange, 
was partly offset by some necessary repairs 
and replacements, leaving the net decrease 
as shown. Africa field accomplished a nota- 
ble decrease in expense. The sending of 
new workers will reflect in the next year. 
So one-half of the decrease was in sup- 
ports of workers invalided home, and re- 
duced expense sending to field. The other 
half was in curtailed work on the field in- 
cluding buildings. The Home Department 
took its share of the program of curtailment 
with results in every phase of its work in- 
cluding administration. More than one-half 
o f the decrease was in Greene County mis- 
sion work and due to the fact that no 
summer pastors were engaged. 

There is again improvement this year over 
the previous year in our investment situa- 
tion. We find 13.9% of all endowment and 
annuity funds non-productive because of 
" frozen " farm loans compared with 16.7% 
last year. Our investments paid into the 
mission treasury this year $20,217.30 after 
annuities, interest on special endowment. 



and office expenses were paid. This com- 
pares with $8,297.02 last year. 



MISSIONS AND CHURCH PROMOTION 

The Budget Authorized by Conference 

1929-30 1930-31 

General Mission Board $330,000 $275,500 

Board of Religious Education 21,500 21,500 

General Ministerial Board 6,500 8,500 

General Education Board 4,500 5,000 

American Bible Society 500 500 

$363,000 $311,000 



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o -» - 3 § § £ E § § 

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CONFERENCE BUDGET | 

Rf Tne 

FIVE YEAD (WEPAGE- <~ 

FOR 1924 TO 1929 

GIVI NG FOR I92«t29 , 

GIVING FOR 1925-JO 1 

— .... GIVING r<X?l930:>l I 








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The graph shows the relative amounts of 
money received for the Conference budget 
the different months of the year. There is 
great joy at the large Conference offering in 
June. The effort to close the year well 
makes February show well. These high 
peaks are exhilarating. The deep valleys are 
rather depressing. The church should work 
toward regular systematic giving so that 
there will be a more steady income for mis- 
sion purposes, 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 
Twenty-seven Years of Missions at a Glance 



165 





Number 


of Mi 


ssionaries 


Home and Foreign Miss. 


o 
'33 v 


"3 a 

en c 
u - 
Z< 

hH O 




>> 
u 

..5 2 

>'2'X. 


.2 


ctf 


a 
o 

5 


< 


O 

H 


p, 

H 


V 

X 

W 

o 
H 


hi 

111 

312 s 


1904-05 


26 




6 




32 


$ 42,629 


$ 46,575 


$ 512 


$11,560 


$ 407,000 


1905-06 


26 




4 




30 


47,448 


38,813 


772 


12,871 


425,000 


1906-07 


26 




4 




30 


45,264 


50,501 


2,004 


13,248 


461,000 


1907-08 


26 




2 




28 


46,864 


46,010 


1,698 


15,073 


503,000 


1908-09 


28 


5 


2 




35 


69,933 


54,227 


472 


15,813 


520,000 


1909-10 


28 


5 


2 




35 


53,920 


46,049 


1,021 


15,802 


574,000 


1910-11 


28 


6 


2 




36 


57,216 


56,553 


1,963 


17,513 


621,000 


1911-12 


31 


12 


4 




47 


69,132 


73,752 


2,007 


19,255 


688,000 


1912-13 


33 


11 


2 




46 


70,931 


72,351 


8,591 


21,320 


722,000 


1913-14 


37 


15 


5 




57 


76,112 


79,621 


7,677 


23,621 


764,000 


1914-15 


36 


18 


5 




59 


87,832 


97,317 


1,262 


26,888 


886,000 


1915-16 


36 


19 


5 




60 


94,947 


94.715 


4,286 


32,034 


935,000 


1916-17 


39 


22 


5 




66 


109,483 


120,141 


2,770 


32,554 


996,000 


1917-18 


33 


32 


3 




68 


154,882 


140,009 


26,420 


35,597 


1,103,000 


1918-19 


42 


36 


3 




81 


233,643 


180.963 


4,478 


39,295 


1,160,000 


1919-20 


62 


44 


5 




111 


333,373 


287,460 


6,717 


41,649 


1,225,000 


1920-21 


65 


48 


7 




120 


295,512 


370,349 


142,238 


45,084 


1,247,000 


1921-22 


63 


52 


7 




122 


263,569 


244,293 


27,259 


46,054 


1,332,000 


1922-23 


63 


50 


7 


2 


122 


309.924 


331,511 


34,226 


47,096 


1,391,000 


1923-24 


64 


52 


7 


6 


129 


280,925 


325,254 


16,668 


49,808 


1,376,000 


1924-25 


61 


53 


3 


11 


128 


270,351 


275,921 


13,826 


50,586 


1,471,283 


1925-26 


61 


49 


3 


11 


124 


318.222 


305,949 


16,625 


52,760 


♦1,449,212 


1926-27 


60 


49 


3 


17 


129 


315,180 


313,948 


14,793 


53,451 


1,519,582 


1927-28 


57 


45 


3 


20 


125 


276,617 


365,137 


13,196 


57,192 


1,592,927 


1928-29 


52 


42 


3 


20 


117 


298,023 


300,989 


2,098 


58,654 


1,603,842 


1929-30 


54 


34 


4 


21 


113 


409.773 


274,659 


4,192 


54,206 


1,651,246 



*This reduction is accounted for by transfer of 
Tract Endowment. 

The above figures have been gleaned from 
the annual reports. While accurate accounts 
have always been kept, changing methods 
of record have required much searching and 
proving of figures to make them accurate for 
comparative purposes. 

1. For convenience and economy of space 
we omit the columns of cents. 

2. The above figures indicate the total in- 
come for mission purposes, including gifts 
from individuals and churches (including the 
share for missions in conference budget), 
bequests, interest from endowment and prof- 
its from the publishing house. 

3. The total Endowment and Annuity 
Fund, however, does not include the Gish 



$28,055.68 from World Wide Endowment to Book and 

Fund and others, the income from which is 
specially designated and cannot be used di- 
rectly in the regular mission budget. 

4. The Relief Funds only include those ad- 
ministered by the Mission Board and do not 
include the approximate $300,000, given in 
1918 — 1921, and which was administered by a 
Special Committee appointed by the Goshen 
Conference, for war relief in Europe and 
Asia. 

5. The total number of workers include 
only those American workers sent out by the 
Board to foreign fields. It would be difficult 
to number the many home workers who have 
received some support, or the many native 
workers in foreign fields. 



CHINA 




Anna Hutchison, 1911 I. E. Oberholtzer, 1916 Elizabeth Oberholtzer, 1916 



Enlarge our minds to grasp thy 
thought, 
Enlarge our hearts to work thy 
plan 
Assured thy purpose faileth not 

To put thy spirit into man! 
God of the present age and hour, 
Thrill us anew with holy power! 
— William Steward Cordon. 



Myrtle Pollock, 1917 





V. Grace Clapper, 1917 Mary Schaeffer, 1917 



Laura J. Shock, 1916 Minnevj* J. Neher, 1924 




F. H. Crumpacker, 1908 Anna Crumpacker, 1908 



Byron M. Flory, 1917 



Nora Flory, 1917 




Ruth F. Ulery, 1926 Edna R. Flory, 1917 Emma Horning, 1908 Minerva Metzger, 1910 




Live Christ, and all thy life shall be 
A sweet uplifting ministry, 
A showing of the fair white seeds 
That fruit through all eternity! 
— John Oxenham. 





Ernest M. Wampler, 1918 



Elizabeth Wampler, 1922 




Walter J. Heisey, 1917 Sue Heisey, 1917 O. C. Sollenberger, 1919 Hazel Sollenberger, 1919 




L. S. Brubaker, 1924 Marie Brubaker, 1924 W. Harlan Smith, 1920 Frances Smith, 1920 




E. L. Ikenberry, 1922 Olivia Ikenberry, 1922 Minor M. Myers, 1919 



/ heard him call, 

'Come follow ; that was all. 
Mp gold grew dim, 

My soul went after him. 
I rose and followed, that was all. 
Who would not follow if he heard 
his call?" 




AFRICA 



Sara Myers, 1919 




Wm. Beahm, 1924 



Esther Beahm, 1924 Clarence C. Heckman, 1924 Lucile Heckman, 1924 




H. Stover Kulp, 1922 Christina Kulp, 1927 Dr. R. L. Robertson, 1927 Bertha Robertson, 1927 




Albert D. Helser, 1922 




Lola Helser, 1923 Dr. Homer L. Burke, 1923 Marguerite Burke, 1923 



"Christ for the world we sing; 
The world to Christ we bring 

With loving zeal; 
The poor and them that mourn 
The faint and overborne, 
Sinsick and sorrow-worn, 

Whom Christ doth heal.' 




Sara Shisler, 1926 



Clara Harper, 1926 Elnora Schechter, 1929 

INDIA 




Dr. A. R. Cottrell, 1913 Dr. Laura Cottrell, 1913 H. P. Garner, 1916 



Kathryn Garner, 1916 




D. J. Lichty, 1902 



Anna Lichty, 1902 



J. M. Blough, 1903 



Anna Blough, 1903 



'T/ie contribution that we have 
to give is not only in thought: it is 
in action. It is a demonstration of 
love in life that is required as the 
hand of the Christian and of Chris- 
tendom." 

— Basil Matthews. 




Mary B. Blickenstaff, 1920 




EHza B. Miller, 1900 Anna B. Brumbaugh, 1919 Adam Ebey 



Alice Ebey, 190ft 




Olive Widdowson, 1912 



Howard L. Alley, 1917 



Hattie Alley, 1917 



Kathryn Ziegler, 1908 




"Forward through the ages in 
unbroken line 
Move the faithful spirits at the call 

divine; 
Gifts in differing measure, hearts of 

one accord, 
Manifold the service, one the sure 
reward. 
Forward through the ages in 

unbroken line 
Move the faithful spirits at the 
call divine." 




Chalmer Shull, 1919 



Mary Shull, 1919 




Arthur S. B. Miller, 1919 



Jennie Miller, 1919 



Harlan J. Brooks, 1924 



Ruth Brooks, 1924 




Baxter M. Mow, 1923 



Anna Mow, 1923 



B. Mary Royer, 1913 Jennie Mohler, 1916 




"The living Christ is what rve 
and all men need, body, mind, heart 
_..d soul. He alone can give us the 
strength n>e need for lifes great 
tasks." 




I. W. Moomaw, 1923 Mabel Moomaw, 1923 Sadie J. Miller, 1903 



Effie Long, 1903 




Ethel Roop, 1926 




Susan L. Stoner, 1927 Elsie N. Shickel, 1921 Dr. B. M. Nickey, 1915 L. Mae Wolf, 1922 




Ella Ebbert, 1917 




Goldie E. Swartz, 1916 





Dr. Ida Metzger, 1925 



SWEDEN 



The restless millions wait 
The light whose dawning 
Maf?es all things new, 
Christ also waits, 
But men are slow and late. 
Have we done all we could? 
Have I? Have you? 





Lillian Grisso, 1917 




Beulah Woods, 1924 




J. F. Graybill, 1911 



Alice Graybill, 1911 



Ida Buckingham, 1913 



174 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



BY DEATH TO LIFE IMMORTAL 

Deceased Missionaries and Date of Death 



China 

B. F. Heckman, 1-14-1913 
Anna B. Blough, 5-9-1922 
Feme Heagley Coffman, 8-8-1925 
Vida Wampler, 10-6-1926 
Lulu Ullom Coffman, 8-30-1928 

Africa 

Ruth Royer Kulp, 6-15-1924 

Sweden 
A. W. Vaniman, 3-14-1908 
Mrs. A. W. Vaniman, 1929 



India 

S. N. McCann, 8-24-1917 

Mary Quinter, 1-14-1914 

Chas. Brubaker, 10-20-1910 

Nora Lichty, 12-12-1918 

Rosa W. Kaylor, 10-29-1917 

S. P. Berkebile, 9-13-1919 

Nora Berkebile, 6-23-1924 

Gertrude Emmert, 11-7-1924 

Amos W. Ross, 5-31-1926 

Andrew G. Butterbaugh, 10-25-1928 



FRUITION 

The torch that I carried so proudly and high 
Went out ! Ah, it burned but a night, 
But ere its flame flickered another torch caught 
And a brother now walks in the light. 



Missionaries Detained, Disabled, or Out of Service 



India 

J. M. Pittenger and wife 

W. B. Stover and wife 

S. Ira Arnold and wife 

Josephine Powell 

H. B. Heisey and wife 

Bertha Ryan Shirk 

Mrs. Chas. Brubaker 

J. B. Emmert 

Mrs. S. N. McCann 

Mrs. Flora Ross Bjorklund 

Q. A. Holsopple and wife 

A. T. Hoffert 
Sara Replogle 

E. H. Eby and wife 
Ida Himmelsbaugh 

D. L. Forney and wife 
Bertha L. Butterbaugh 

F. M. Hollenberg and wife 
Elizabeth Kintner 

B. F. Summer and wife 

China 

O. G. Brubaker and wife 
L. A. Stump and wife 
Geo. Hylton and wife 



Mrs. B. F. Heckman 

Miles Blickenstaff and wife 

Valley Miller 

Esther Kreps 

Samuel B. Bowman and wife 

Raymond Flory and wife 

Dr. Carl Coffman 

N. A. Seese and wife 

Mary Cline 

Dr. D. L. Horning and wife 

Ernest Vaniman and wife 

Dr. F. J. Wampler and wife 

Ada Dunning Hollenberg 

Bessie Rider Harley 

Denmark 

A. F. Wine and wife 
W. E. Glasmire and wife 
Niels Esbensen and wife 



Africa 

Earl W. Flohr and wife 
Dr. J. Paul Gibbel and wife 
Floyd Mallott and wife 



June 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



175 



# 



^^»«^«^*^^^^^^^^^«^^^«^«^^^^^^»^^^^2^^^^^^&^^^^^ 



The Ministry of Love to 
INDIA 

THE RECORD OF PROGRESS 



India During 1929 

H. P. GARNER 

The year 1929 has been an unusual one 
in many ways. Early in the year Sister 
Butterbaugh with her children returned to 
America because of the death of Bro. 
Butterbaugh several months before. Near 
the close of the year the Moomaws and 
Sister Roop had to return earlier than usual 
on account of health conditions. Also, there 
seemed to have been an unusual number of 
operations performed on members of the 
mission family. Then too, among our 
Indian workers and families there were 
epidemics of influenza, chicken-pox, measles, 
small-pox and other diseases. 

We all rejoiced when a number of ex- 
perienced workers returned from furlough 
in America near the close of the year. Some 
of these had been detained over regular fur- 
lough on account of lack of funds. We 
also rejoiced because Dr. J. W. Fox and 
wife and son Dallas were added to our 
family. 

The old saying that no nation will rise 
higher than her women, is receiving con- 
sideration in India as well as in other parts 
of the world. The Sarda Bill which was 
passed early in the year has raised the age 
of marriage for both girls and boys. Un- 
fortunately this caused a lot of people to 
hurry and get their girls, some not more 
than babies, married before the law went 
into effect. 

Indian Leadership 

Such subjects as devolution scheme, church 
buildings, Bible schools, trained workers, 
new church organizations, election of church 
officials, development of work, are topics 



'fmmmmmmmmmmmmmm^ 

frequently discussed when workers get to- 
gether. 

I think that all are pleased with the way 
the Indian leaders have taken hold of the 
work during the past year and still higher 
hopes are held out for the future. The 
devolution scheme or whatever you may 
wish to call it, has started off better than 
some had thought it would. From the 
station reports we get such expressions as, 
revival of effort, new interest, more activity, 
each member was concerned, we opened up 
new work, our church has taken over the 
evangelistic work, the main growth for the 
past year is in giving, a new church was 
organized, and the deepening of the spiritual 
life and encouragement in voluntary evan- 
gelistic effort was urged. 

From nearly every station came the report 
of additions by baptism. Anklesvar reports 
a new church organization ; and Jalalpor, 
Anklesvar, and Vyara report election of 
ministers or deacons, or both. More and 
more Indian elders are being ordained and 
given charge of the churches. More than 
half of the churches in the First District 
of India are under direct supervision of 
Indian elders and they are taking a keen 
interest in shepherding the flock. More and 
more we expect the work to develop a 
church centric attitude and less mission 
centric. It is pleasing to note that a num- 
ber of churches have adopted some form 
of systematic giving. Some have the scale 
of one-tenth and some another proportion. 
Bulsar reports an average of five and one 
half rupees per member or about two dollars 
for the last year. The total church mem- 
bership has now nearly reached the four 
thousand mark. 



176 



The Missionary Visitor 



une 
930 



New Buildings 

Great interest has been centered around 
church buildings. Anklesvar is in the midst 
of her building operations. Vyara recently 
had some prominent Hindu friends to make 
speeches at the dedication of the ground for 
their church. Ahwa is collecting some ma- 
terial and Palghar and Dahanu have started 
building funds. The local churches are all 
helping very much in funds for these build- 
ings. 

One very important feature of the work 
in the Marathi area was the opening up in 
June, 1929, of the Bible school at Vada with 
Bro. C. G. Shull and Sister Alice K. Ebey 
as instructors. We have been waiting for 
this for a number of years. And the report 
is that the beginning has been good. 

The Gujarati Bible School, under the 
direction of Bro. Long and later under Bro. 
Blough, with efficient Indian help, has car- 
ried on nicely. Both of these schools find 
much room to make practical use of their 
new knowledge in public speaking, personal 
work, libraries and filling regular church 
appointments. They give the following re- 
port: "A deeper spirit of devotion has 
developed, a greater desire for prayer and 
service has been felt, and a greater longing 



for the Spirit's power to testify was ex- 
perienced." Of course this is what we 
should expect when men and women ccme 
face to face with the holy Word and the 
living, loving Father. 

In connection with the development of 
the church and the study of the Bible we 
should also mention that there was expe- 
rienced an unusual amount of persecution 
during the past year. Bhat-Jalalpor, Vyara, 
Anklesvar, Umalla-Vali and Khergam-Bulsar 
all have had much opposition but all report 
victory through Christ. 

Schools Approved by Government 

The Anklesvar Vocational Training School 
is making for itself a name both before 
the government and other missions. And 
other missions are asking that some of their 
workers be trained there. Good work has 
also been done in the girls' school at Ankles- 
var, Vyara, Jalalpor, Khergam and Dahanu. 
Boys' schools at Umalla-Vali, Vyara, Bulsar, 
Wankal, Palghar have all been running with 
the usual activities along the educational 
lines. Palghar has recently opened a car- 
pentry class which has already received 
government recognition. At Palghar the 
mission, because of its interest in and activ- 




Photo by J. W. Fox. 



TWO DANGI KINGS in the center. The first is Raja of Pimped and the second is Raja of Gardhvi. In 
the background is the little train that travels 40 miles in V/z hours to the terminus at Waghai Dangs from 
where we go to Ahwa. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



177 



ities along the agricultural lines, has become 
a member of the Palghar County Agricul- 
tural Development Association. An in- 
creased amount of English has been given 
in most schools. All heads of institutions, 
both girls and boys, report an increase in 
the amount of fees they have been able to 
collect and in the amount of clothes that 
the parents have supplied for their children. 
At Ahwa, both in the village schools and 
the Ahwa school, there was experienced a 
weakness in the staff as our leaders were 
given a leave of absence to attend the Bible 
school at Vada. There has been keen in- 
terest manifested by the pupils of these in- 
stitutions in Sunday-school extension work, 
service and evangelistic work. 

Temperance Organizations 

There seems to have been a renewed 
effort put forward on behalf of temperance 
and most stations report good work done 
along this line. At Ahwa, Palghar, Bulsar, 
Vyara and Ja.lalpor, new organizations were 
formed among those who signed the pledge. 
Progress at Ahwa 

While Ahwa cannot report any great 
strides in the educational work, she does 
report a number of additions to the church. 
There was a decided interest in a new 
church building and community work. The 
laymen's movement has been a help along 
this line. Better village arrangements and 
the repairing of four miles of government 
road by the members of the community at 
a very small compensation were among the 
special features. The cooperation, spirit, 
and manner in which the road work was 
done, called forth the praise of both gov- 
ernment officials and villagers. 

Medical Work Increases 

The medical work has been carried on 
by our efficient medical staff in a way that 
has increased the demand on both their 
time and energy. Both the Bulsar and 
Dahanu hospitals have been exceptionally 
busy. Bulsar hospital for the first time in 
its history has met its own expenses outside 
of the support of the foreign doctors. A 
new feature of the work in connect'on with 
the Dahanu hospital is the erection and 
gift, by some local friends, of a building 
of several rooms to accommodate families 
who come to the hospital for treatment. 



The people now say, " This is not your 
work but OUR work." Brother Ebey at 
Vada has been worked to the limit of his 
strength in the dispensary there. Ahwa and 
Umalla-Vali report many calls. 

The special home for the widows and the 
one for the babies have been running full 
time. The baby home had an unusual ex- 
perience in being moved virtually from Dan 
to Beer Sheba, or from Umalla on the 
north to Dahanu in the south of our area. 
Here it is under the direct supervision of 
the Dahanu medical workers and seems to 
be enjoying the change. The largest growth 
reported here is in the children outgrowing 
their clothes. 

Presenting Christ to the Masses 

At Christmas time special effort has been 
made to bring the meaning of Christmas 
before the outside people. At Ahwa, the 
Christian people lined up and paraded 
through the village, carrying placards con- 
taining scripture verses and singing Christ- 
mas carols. At Bulsar a public meeting 
was held in the bazaar at which high caste 
Hindu people gave talks, stating what 
Christmas meant to them. At other places 
they have used the times of fairs and other 
special gatherings to present the Christ to 
the crowds. 

Sister Brumbaugh, who is alone at the 
Pinjal school ten miles from Vada, among 
the common people of that section, deserves 
our praise and encouragement. 

For a number of years some of our mis- 
sionaries have given talks in reading rooms 
but it is only recently that these have been 
established at Vyara, Navsari, and Bulsar. 
All are pleased with the responses they have 
received and the interest that people are 
taking in reading Christian literature. 

& & 

THE INDIGENOUS CHURCH 

(Continued from Page 191) 
evangelistic work which includes village 
schools, and though nearly all the money 
comes from the West it is meant that the 
churches assume all financial responsibility 
as soon as possible, except perhaps in edu- 
cation. Evangelism is decidedly the work of 
the church and she must do it in her home 
borders. The unoccupied fields will require 
the united efforts of both the older and 
younger churches lest there be unpardonable 
delay in their evangelization. 



178 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



Our Oldest India Mission Station 

BULSAR 
MARY BLICKENSTAFF 

The early history of the Church of the 
Brethren in India centers around Bulsar. 
Brother and Sister W. B. Stover and Sister 
Bertha Ryan opened the work here in 1895. 
Later on came J. M. Blough's, E. H. Eby's, 
A. W. Ross' and Sister Ida C. Shumaker. 
After Bro. A. W. Ross and family left on 
furlough in 1922, J. E. Wagoner and family 
took over the station work until 1927. 

Those beginning days were famine days 
and about 600 starving boys and girls were 
gathered into orphanages by the mission, the 
greater part of them living at Bulsar. Most 
of those who survived have grown into 




■ & * 




Photo by A. C. Mow. 

GRAVES AT BULSAR. First slab, Mamie Quin- 
ter, 2nd slab, Rosa Kaylor, mound, Andrew Butter- 
baugh, 1st upright stone, Paul Ebey, 2nd upright 
stone, Mary Ebey. 



Homes by Easy Payment Plan 

The community has 
been much benefited by 
the Co-operative Credit 
Society which was or- 
ganized in 1923. In 1926 
a small tract of land 
was sub-divided by the 
mission. Thus a num- 
ber of worthy Chris- 
tians have been enabled 
to acquire homes of 
their own through the 
easy payment plan. 



Photo by Jennie Mohler. 

IN BULSAR DISPENSARY. 



Showing east end of operating room 



Christian men and women. They and their 
children are helping to carry on the work of 
spreading the gospel in this part of India. 
The Church 
The first church was organized at Bulsar 
in 1899. The present membership is 170. 
During the past three years Bro. Govindji K. 
Satvedi has served as both pastor and elder. 
Since 1929 the church has assumed responsi- 
bility for carrying on the evangelistic work. 
A reading room containing Christian litera- 
ture is maintained in the bazaar. The total 
contributions of the church for 1929 aver- 
aged $2.02 per member. 



Schools 

The Bulsar Boys' 
Boarding School, under 
the management of a 
missionary and two In- 
dian brethren, provides 
a hostel for about 70 
boys and instruction for 
about 180, including community children. 
Carpentry, gardening and tailoring are 
taught in the school. 

The Bible School for the Gujarati area is 
located at Bulsar. Bro. Blough directed this 
work until his furlough when Bro. I. S. Long 
took his place. Bro. Long left for his fur- 
lough at the close of 1929, and Bro. Blough is 
again in charge. In addition to his duties in 
the Bible School, Bro. Blough is engaged in 
selecting and preparing Christian literature 
to be published in Gujarati. 

The Widows' Home has for years been a 
place of refuge to varying numbers of un- 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



179 



fortunate women. The home was supervised 
by Sister Elizabeth Kintner prior to her fur- 
lough ; since then Sister Jennie Mohler has 
had charge. 

Office of Secretary- Treasurer 

The office of the secretary-treasurer, Bro. 
L. A. Blickenstaff, is at Bulsar. In his office 
is centralized the accounting for the whole 
mission, and through it the work of the field 
and the related work of the Mission Board 
at Elgin are kept properly synchronized. 
Medical Work 

Last, but not least important of Bulsar 
station activities, is the medical work. Drs. 
Raymond and Laura Cottrell came to India 
in 1913. Under their direction the Quinter 
Memorial Hospital was opened 1917. The 
work has grown with the passing years. Drs. 
Cottrell with Sister Jennie Mohler, R. N., 
and their faithful native assistants, such as 
Dr. Raghuel Jerome, have established for 
themselves and the mission a place of confi- 
dence in the hearts of the Indian people who 
come from far and near for treatment. The 
year of 1929 has been unusual in the medical 
work from a financial standpoint. The re- 
ceipts have exceeded the expenditures, due 
to the patronage of a more prosperous class 
of patients and a greater number of surgical 
operations having been performed. At the 
close of the year Dr. J. W. Fox came from 
America, a most welcome addition to the 
medical staff. He is now in language study 
preparatory to taking over the work when 
Drs. Cottrell leave for furlough in 1930. 

From a Grass Hut to Organized 
Church Groups 

UMALLA-VALI 

A. S. B. MILLER 

When D. L. Miller visited India he was a 
guest in a grass hut which was the home 
of D. J. Lichty's and Sadie Miller. These 
brave people opened up the work at Umalla- 
Vali. Prior to this, during the famine in 
1899 and 1900, relief work was carried on 
from Anklesvar by Bro. McCann, and Raj 
Pipla State became open to evangelistic 
work. 

New Recruits; the Baby Home 

Following them Adam Ebey's, E. H. Eby's 




Photo by Kathryn Ziegler. 

VERA AMTHA AND FAMILY who have been 
working with Sister Ziegler in evangelistic touring. 

Ira Arnold's and Quincy Holsopple's con- 
tributed to the growth of the work. 

Miss Ida Himmelsbaugh's love for babies 
gave her a vision of a baby home which 
she started. This was moved to the railway 
in 1919 when Umalla was opened as a. center 
for evangelistic and medical work. 
During Last Five Years 

During the last five years, B. F. Summer's, 
D. J. Lichty's and A. S. Miller's have 
had charge of schools and evangelistic work. 
Miss Ziegler has done touring among the 
villages. Miss Widdowson had charge of the 
baby home, besides carrying on the medical 
work started by Miss Himmelsbaugh. 

When Miss Widdowson went on furlough, 
Miss Mae Wolf took charge of the baby 
home until it was moved to Dahanu. 

Churches Responsible for Evangelism 

The Umalla-Vali district is made up of 
three church groups. One of these churches 
was organized during the year of 1928 and 
now has a membership of sixty-four, who 
live in four different villages. The two 



180 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 




Photo by A 



VALI BOARDING SCHOOL. Seventy-five boys reside in the boarding hostel of the school, 
from various villages of Rajpipla State and from Anklesvar District. 



They come 



other churches are those located at Vali and 
Amletha. 

These three churches have taken over the 
definite responsibility of the evangelistic 
work of the area. In this project they have 
contributed $154.00 during the past year. 
Having this responsibility has made the 
leaders of the church plan ways for raising 
funds. During the past year the tithing plan 
was adopted and was found quite workable 
for the wage earners, but the non-wage 
earners hardly came under the plan. This 
has shown the need of definite teaching that 
all may take an equal share of the responsi- 
bility of giving. 

Interest in Schools Grows 

Since 1925, two thriving schools have been 
opened with splendid attendance. Another, 
which had been a little one-room, one- 
teacher school has grown to a four-room, 
four-teacher school and has the honor of 
being the best village school in Raj Pipla 
State. Still another, which had been closed 
because of the teacher going to Bible school 
and because of a lack of interest among 
the village people, was reopened due to the 
village people's own urgent request and is 
now continuing regularly even with a rival 
school near by. In another village where 
there was little interest, the teacher was 
(Continued on Page 200) 




Photo by A. C. Mow. 

PRIZE WINNERS. These boys won second and 
third prizes in the temperance contest of all Gjuarat, 
which was sponsored by the W. C. T. U. They are 
studying in the seventh grade of the Vali school. 



June 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



181 




Photo by A. C. Mow. 

DEVJI RAMJI. This brother was recently elected 
to the ministry. 

" The Field Is White Unto the 
Harvest " 

JALALPOR 

ELIZA B. MILLER 

The work at Jalalpor began in 1899 under 
the direction of Brother and Sister D. L. 
Forney. In these early years much atten- 
tion was given to famine and relief work. 
Others who have had charge of the station 
work to date are: I. S. Long's, Miss Quinter, 
Miss Ziegler, J. B. Emmert's, Miss Sara 
Replogle, Miss Ida C. Shumaker, Miss Eliza 
B. Miller and Baxter Mow's. 

Evangelism in the Villages 

Of this work it can truly be said that the 
" field is white unto the harvest," and our 
greatest joy is, that, despite the new awak- 
ening and zeal of our enemies, all political 
and other cross currents of the day, we 
still find many who are seeking God. Our 
village brethren have essayed to reach these, 
and in season we go with stereopticon and 
other special evangelistic means. Within 
the five years there have been 146 baptisms. 
Boarding and Village Schools 

The Girls' Boarding School is the center 



of activity at the main station. Sixty girls 
are enrolled in the boarding department. A 
few day pupils increase the enrollment in 
the day school to over seventy. Four teach- 
ers manage the classes. The regular gov- 
ernment course of study for primary schools 
is followed with the course of instruction for 
religious instruction, provided by the mis- 
sion. Ten to sixteen village schools have 
been in operation, only two of which have 
been under government supervision. Bhat 
school has suffered from the persecution of 
Christians in the village. 




Photo by E. B. Miller 

TEACHERS IN GIRLS' SCHOOL AT JALALPOR. 

Dayabai Jwan, Rachelbai Jwan and Elizabeth 
Mahadevlal were trained in Methodist college and 
Shantibai Girdar received her training at Anklesvar. 



Medicine and the Gospel 

Many people have come for medicine for 
skin diseases, during the years since Miss 
Quinter was in the station. These medicines 
now come from the Bulsar dispensary. 
Pleasant and friendly contacts are made 
with these patients from the surrounding 
villages to which the story of the good 
medicine is taken. Those suffering from 
other than skin diseases are directed to our 
doctors at Bulsar or Dahanu. Christian 
literature and scripture portions are often 
taken by these patients. 



182 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



Vyara 

H. J. BROOKS 

The work was started at Vyara by Brother 
and Sister A. W. Ross in 1905. Amid diffi- 
culties, they bought land, erected buildings 
and established boarding schools during their 
nine years of service there. In 1913 I. S. 
Long's came to take charge of the work, re- 
maining until 1921. During these years prog- 
ress was made in the village work and 
schools. From 1912 to 1921 Miss Sadie J. 



*-M 


§»lAt% 


) u 


. 


.' 




t-0 


, ' •> 


jjf3 




• hk x f\ A I 


' - '! 


it... 


. 


yyfiffc : +>' '■'■; - 





Photo by Dr. Fox. 

VYARA GIRLS WHO GAVE A HEALTH DRAMA showing the value 
of eating vegetables, fruit, milk, and eggs, and giving peppers and tea a 
hard knock. 



Miller directed village evangelism among 
women. For two years Miss Lillian Grisso 
had charge of the Girls' Boarding School. 

Others who were responsible for work at 
Vyara are : J. M. Blough's, 1920-28, who had 
charge of the Boys' Boarding School, evan- 
gelism, and assisted in Bible translation; An- 



etta Mow who has had charge of the Girls' 
Boarding School since 1919; H. J. Brooks 
who has been responsible for work in evan- 
gelism and Boys' Boarding since 1924; and J. 
E. Wagoner's who have had special respon- 
sibilities in evangelism since 1929. 
The Church 
Through white Christmas gifts, self-denial 
week and tithing, Vyara church provided 
one-fourth of the cost of the substantial 
building being erected, besides paying fifty 
per cent of the Indian 
pastor's support by 1929. 
The pastor is also offi- 
ciating elder. The pan- 
chayat (a committee of 
five) in each village, be- 
gan to be recognized by 
Bro. Blough and made 
responsible for church 
matters. From 400 to 
760 attend semi-annual 
station communions. In 
villages there are from 
30 to 100 communicants. 
For the first time in 
Vyara history our high- 
est resident official, a 
Mohammedan, attended 
church for several 
months during 1928. There are two elders 
and two ministers in the Vyara church. 

The Making of Disciples 

At present there are more than twenty 
Sunday-schools in Vyara area. 




Photo by A. C. Mow 



VYARA CONGREGATION 



June 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



183 




Photo by A. C. Mow 



YEARLY "JATRA" (RELIGIOUS FAIR) at Vyara, when thousands of people attend. In front left hand 
corner note the Christian tents and "booth" where services are held both day and night during the fair. 



Some of our Christians have been attracted 
by the goddess movement, an Arya Samaj 
effort to win villagers to Hinduism. How- 
ever, our evangelistic efforts have been en- 
couraging. Our work in the annual fair has 
grown until last year a record crowd of 900 
attended one evening. During February 
special effort was made to send the boarding 
children and workers out to the villages in 
groups to tell the story of the gospel. A 
Bible institute was held in November for 
village workers. Evenings of slides, sermons 
and Biblical plays drew groups from near-by 
villages and towns. 

The Bloughs, during their seven and one- 
half years of service, entered new territory, 
opened new schools, and baptized many. The 
Brookses, succeeding Blough's, toured in 
Arya Samaj circuits, and strengthened 
schools. Because of the deficit several 
schools were closed. 

Boarding Schools 

There has been a marked increase in en- 
rollment in the Boys' and Girls' Schools dur- 
ing the past few years. In 1927 the Boys' 
Boarding undertook the agriculture bias 
course, and in 1929, English. Boarding stu- 
dents have grown in willingness to pay fees, 
until in 1929 one-third of the boys supplied 
all their clothing, and the girls paid rupees 



90 for clothing besides some fees. The state 
officials have visited both schools and praise 
the quality of work. 

The pupils have a part in the evangelistic 
program also, going out to the villages of the 
district to help in week-end meetings. 

Growth in Spite of Opposition 

KHERGAM 

IDA C. SHUMAKER 

Since work was opened in Wankal in 
1916 by Bro. A. W. Ross, the work has 
gone steadily forward even in the teeth of 
fierce opposition. The first baptism was in 
1918. 

In 1921, Bro. Jethalal Hirabhai and family 
came to Khergam to supervise the district 
schools there in progress under the direc- 
tion of Bro. E. H. Eby. Toward the close 
of 1925 land was purchased in Khergam, a 
building was erected for a girls' boarding, 
and dedicated May 7, 1926, under the direc- 
tion of Bro. J. E. Wagoner. Jan. 20, 1927, 
Bro. N. V. Solanky and family, with the 
little " nest egg " of Khergam Girls' Board- 
ing, came to take charge of this work in 
the boarding and district schools under the 



184 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 




Photo by A. C. Mow 
KHERGAM CONGREGATION taken just three years to the day after the work at Khergam first began. 



direction of Ida C. Shumaker. First bap- 
tism, April 11, 1927. First love feast in 
June ; fifty-four communed. First Christian 
wedding, Sept. 3, 1927. 

Khergam Church was organized April 1, 
1928, with Bro. N. V. Solanky as elder. 
There are now eight Christian families in 
the near vicinity. Five of these have taken 
land and built houses. 

Since 1929, a cooperative society has been 
functioning. Five schools have been regis- 
tered. Two Hindu villagers have deeded to 
the mission in two villages, land and school- 




houses for school and evangelistic purposes, 
as a mark of cooperation. 

Work Among Moslems 

B. M. MOW 

This work originated from the urgent need 
of the Christian witness among Moslems, 
who comprise fifteen to twenty per cent of 
the population in these parts, and whose im- 
portance must be rated at a much higher 
figure. In November of 1924 the mission 
gave us opportunity to prepare for such a 
field, which involved 
extra time for study of 
Moslem evangelization. 
At length, in 1927 we 
settled in Navsari and 
began work in a small 
way, along with the 
other duties that came 
to us. We hope that 
later our activity may 
extend to other places. 
We have a Bible 
woman, named Manek- 
bai, who has for nearly 
three years been ren- 
H^mMH 1% dering an excellent 

■j^^i service in house to 

house visiting and 



Photo by Lillian Grisso. 

MOHAMMEDAN CHILDREN at Navsari 



teaching of women. Last 
May another avenue of 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



18! 



approach was added — 
a public library, with a 
small stock of Christian 
literature in Urdu and 
Gujarati, and several 
newspapers. Also, we 
secured a Mr. Abbas, 
now " John," a Bohr 
convert from a sister 
mission among Mos- 
lems in Bombay. He 
is a talented young man 
and eager for work for 
his Christ, so with his 
help we build strong 
hopes for the further- 
ance of God's plan. 




Photo by Anetta C. Mow. 

BAPTISM AT JALALPOR. Brother Mow administering the rite of bap- 
tism to Abbas, a Moslem mullah. He changed his name to John. Since 
becoming a Christian he helps in the Christian reading room at Xavsari 



Developing an Indigenous Church 

AHWA 

It was on January 23, 1907, that Brother 
and Sister J. M. Pittenger arrived at Ahwa 
and began the w r ork here. While the Pit- 
tengers were on furlough, Bro. J. I. Kaylor 
and wife carried on the work. On their re- 
turn from America they again took charge 



in 1915 and continued two years, when be- 
cause of the ill health of Bro. Pittenger they 
had to give up the work. Bro. Blough and 
wife came to the Dangs in Nov., 1917, and 
were in charge until Bro. Adam Ebey's re- 
turned from furlough and took over the work 
in Jan.. 1919. Early in the year 1923. C. G. 



and Marv Shul 




Photo by Dr. Fox. 

HOME OF A CHRISTIAN FAMILY at Ahwa 



came, to Ahwa and took 
charge of the school. 
Oh Dec. 31, 1924, after 
their return from fur- 
lough the Garners came 
and took over the work 
of Adam Ebey's who 
were transferred to Va- 
da. Bro. Shull's went 
on furlough in March, 
1927. Near the close of 
that year A. G. and 
Bertha Butterbaugh 
took up the school 
work. After eleven 
short months of faith- 
ful work the all-wise 
Father saw fit to call 
Bro. Butterbaugh to a 
higher service. His go- 
ing was a great loss to 
the work. 

The Garners have 



186 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 

1930 




READING ROOM OF THE NAVSARI LIBRARY. 

printed in Urdu and Gujarati. 



Many of the magazines and papers are 



been in charge of the evangelistic work the 
past five years and since Butterbaugh's have 
gone and while Shull's were on furlough the 
oversight of the school fell into their hands 
too. 

School Work Increases 

It is no small task to educate a jungle peo- 
ple who have little or no desire for learning, 
but we are glad for those who do want to 
learn. All has not been accomplished that 
we would desire, yet we are thankful for the 
progress made. Diwanji Dayabhai is the 
first Dangi boy to complete a year's training. 
He began teaching in one of our village 
schools June 17, 1929, and has done very 
good work. Another boy from our school 
taught his first this year in Ahwa. There 
are nine Dangi boys teaching. Our largest 
village school is growing. Thirteen new 
boys entered recently. There are 46 day 
pupils and twelve in night school. 

In the Industrial School, which is financed 
by the government and supervised by the 
mission, there are twelve students. Both 
teachers in this school are Christians. 
Bible Women Teach in Homes 

The only regular evangelistic workers be- 
sides the village teachers are two Bible 
women who go out nearly every day among 
the women of the community. Touring was 
done during the years 1925-1927, but since 
then only occasional trips could be made be- 



cause of the other duties which fell to the 
missionary in charge. The Indian workers 
whom we had, died, and it was not deemed 




Photo by Mary Shull. 

IDOL AT AHWA worshiped once each year by the 
policemen and soldiers. It has fallen down and is 
in need of repair. 



June 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



187 



wise to import another, so we are trying to 
develop indigenous workers. A number of 
non-Christian boys from outside villages 
have come into our boarding school this 
year. Eight of them are in an inquirer's 
class. We hope some of them may develop 
into workers who will go out and win others. 

Progress Since 1905 

Vada 
ALICE K. EBEY 

WORK was begun in 1905 by Steven 
Berkebile. Josephine Powell came 
a year later. The opposition they 
encountered and the discomforts they suf- 
fered, living in a native house thirty miles 
from the railway in the pre-motor age, 
would make a thrilling story. In five years 
Bro. Berkebile retired on account of failing 
health. 

Josephine Powell devoted a dozen years to 
work in Vada District. People still tell of 
her kindnesses, especially among the sick. 
Her last work was the founding of the Rosa 
Wagoner Kaylor Boarding School. 

Of the score or more missionaries who 
lived here, J. I. Kaylor has given the great- 
est number of years. From here his wife, 
Rosa, was called to higher service. A few 
years before, Chas. H. Brubaker, after work- 



ing less than a year, had passed away and a 
few years later, Steven Berkebile. " Be- 
hold, the curse of the gods on the mission- 
aries," opposers began to say. 

Boys' Boarding Schools 

H. P. Garner erected a number of build- 
ings and opened a boys' boarding school. 
The boys were moved to Palghar and Bro. 
Kaylor started a boarding school in the vil- 
lage of Piujal twelve miles distant. Miss 
Brumbaugh is in charge of the school there. 
Cheerfully she bears discomforts and brave- 
ly meets obstacles in this lonely station. 

Service in the Villages 

Bro. Kaylor and Indian workers have gone 
to nearly every one of the 157 villages. Dur- 
ing the open seasons he and his family have 
lived in a tent among the people. The 
Misses Swartz and Brumbaugh and Mrs. 
Ebey, with their Bible women, have also 
visited many homes and villages. 

The Marathi Bible School was opened in 
1929 with Bro. Shull in charge. Mrs. Shull 
and Mrs. Ebey have assisted. Experienced 
workers are studying the Bible. It is the 
aim to deepen their spiritual life and better 
fit them for winning souls in the several sta- 
tions of the Marathi area. They have been 
going out in groups on Sundays to give the 
Christian message in the villages. 




Photo by Mary Shull. 



FIRST CLASS in Marathj Bible School at VacJa- 



188 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



Brother Ebey in Medical Work 

For two years Bro. Ebey has given much 
time to medical work. About a hundred 
people come daily. During 1929, over 22,000 
sick were served. Many homes and hearts 
have been opened through this service. That 
many may learn to know Jesus as a healer 
of souls, is the yearning hope of all who love 
Vada and her people. Hitherto the work 
has been of slow growth, but a great turn- 
ing to the Lord out of this district is the 
hope for the future. 

Growth in Church and School 
Work 

ANKLESVAR 

SADIE J. MILLER 

This station was opened Nov. 15, 1899, by 
Bro. S. N. McCann. Since that time the 
following missionaries have worked here : 
D. J. Lichty's, I. S. Long's, W. B. Stover's, 
Mary N. Quinter, Kathryn Ziegler, Ida Him- 
melsbaugh, J. M. Blough's, Olive Widdow- 
son, Ira Arnold's, Eliza B. Miller, A. S. B. 
Miller's, Lillian Grissd, Jennie Mohler, Sadie 
J. Miller, Elsie N. Shickel, Mae Wolf, Beu- 
lah M. Woods, I. W. Moomaw's and Susan 
Stoner. Beginning with A. S. B. Miller's, all 
have worked at Anklesvar in the last five 
years including I. S. Long's. If all these 
could speak, volumes might be written to 
our great edification. 







'{; £\ '1«& 






■ :: g0ii'-< 








Pf y 








I 1 


■i "V mm . : , 






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,-.• ■ - •-■*> 


■ - . ".. 




Photo by Anetl 



GETTING DINNER. These girls are slicing up their vegetables and 
preparing spices for their evening meal. 



Photo by Kathryn Ziegler. 

MITHA AMTHA who now lives in Anklesvar. 



Vocational Training 

The Vocational Training School has come 
into full working orders in the last five years. 
Bro. Moomow had his heart set to the task 
of giving courses which prepare students to 
be farmers, carpenters and blacksmiths. It 
has been a satisfaction to see how the gov- 
ernment has depended on the school to lead 
out in the new agri- 

cultural course. One 

hundred and eighty-five 
young men have at- 
tended since 1925. 

In connection w i t h 
the Girls' School, the 
practical arts depart- 
ment has been started 
and fifty-four girls have 
been in attendance. 

Each year a few girls 
have been married and 
gone out into homes of 
their own. We trust 
they will greatly im- 
prove home conditions 
for India. Our students, 
both boys and girls, are 
given experience in 



June 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



189 




Mrs. D. J. Li 

PRACTICE SCHOOL FOR teachers in preparation at the V. T. S. at Anklesvar. 



evangelistic work as much as possible, along 
with their school program. 

Three Organized Churches 

Three churches have been organized in 
this area. In these five years four ministers 
were elected and one ordained to the elder- 
ship. Also deacons were put in that office ; 
they faithfully serve at love feasts and 
wherever needed. The McCann Memorial 
church is now being erected. Aside from the 
help received from the home church the 
Anklesvar church has pledged six thousand 
rupees. Some of this is coming in very slow- 
ly on account of the crop failures. Our vil- 
lage Christians are mostly farmers. The 
church has taken over the evangelistic work 
of Anklesvar area and many of the laymen 
are also rallying to the cause of evangelism. 
Village schools and Sunday-schools continue 
their work. The Sunday-school examina- 
tions are held yearly. 

Programs on Temperance; Literature 

The temperance cause receives its due 
amount of enthusiasm. Many programs have 
been rendered in and out of villages, especi- 
ally at our own station, Anklesvar. A little 



paper, "The Gujarat Temperance News," is 
edited by a member of this station. 

During the past two years, Sister Long 
compiled a children's song-book and also 
edited a monthly magazine for children. 
These are doing their mission of good all 
over Gujarat. India has her struggle against 
alcohol in common with other nations of the 
world. Christian teaching is doing much to 
guard the Christian communities from this 
age-long curse. 

J* & 

Steady Growth During Last Five 
Years 

PALGHAR 

H. L. ALLEY 

As early as 1916 an Indian evangelist was 
located at Palghar. In 1920 land was secured 
and buildings started, preparatory to the ar- 
rival of Bro. H. P. Garner and family July 1, 
1921, to formally open the work of the sta- 
tion. Following the Garners, Bro. A. G. But- 
terbaugh and family came and later Bro. F. 
M. Hollenberg and family. During the first 
two and a half months of 1925 the two fami- 
lies were together, the latter doing school 



190 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



work and the former 

district evangelistic 

work. After that the 

Hollenbergs were in full 

charge until Feb. 25, 

1927, when Bro. H. L. 

Alley and family re- 
turned from America 

and took over the work 

soon to be left by the 

Hollenbergs leaving on 

furlough. 

Last Five Years 
Jan. 1, 1925, the Pal- 
ghar Church of 24 mem- 
bers was less than one 

year old, the Boys' 

Boarding School was in 

its second year, while 

there were no village 

schools. During the five year period that 
followed, the church doubled its member- 
ship. Now there are three village schools. 
The boarding school is registered and re- 
ceives government aid. All regular courses 
are taught ; besides there is an English class, 
and work in agriculture and carpentry. The 
carpentry class is also registered. Boys who 
have completed the course have gone for 
further training as teachers. Those who do 
not become teachers may take further train- 
ing in carpentry. Thus we hope to prepare 
workers and also to develop independent 
Christian citizens. Much credit is due Mr. 
V. J. Gorde who has been head-master of the 
school since it began in 1923. 

Thus the past five years have recorded a 
steady growth in each line of work which 
gives encouragement and hope for greater 
things in the future. 

Cooperation in Education of 
Missionary Children 

Woodstock School 
SUSAN L. STONER 

The education of missionary children is 
no small problem to missionary parents. 
Rather than meet this need separately as 
individual missions, it has become inevitable 
that a cooperative effort is far more suc- 
cessful. 

Woodstock School is an institution es- 
pecially adapted to the needs of the chil- 
dren of missionaries and other Europeans 




Photo by Dr. Fox. 

THE ALLEY FAMILY, ALSO MRS. FOX AND DALLAS at left. 



in India. It was organized in 1852 and 
established in its present location in 1854. 
It has been owned and controlled by the 
American Presbyterian Mission since 1874. 
However, in 1923 the American United Pres- 
byterian Mission became a cooperating body. 
In 1927 the United Church of Canada, the 
Church of the Brethren, the Methodist 
Episcopal, the Disciples of Christ, the Y. 
M. C. A. Committee, and American Baptist 
Missions began to cooperate in the insti- 
tution, so now Woodstock is a union in- 
stitution supported and controlled by the 
mission societies mentioned above. 

Woodstock is ideally located within the 
municipal boundaries of the hill station of 
Mussoorie in the Himalayan Mountains. 
The climate is good. The beautiful wooded 
school estate consists of about 150 acres, 
overlooking the Dehra valley. 

There are four commodious and well- 
ventilated buildings providing for the class- 
rooms and dormitories for the pupils who 
range from kindergarten age through high 
school and a three year Teacher Training 
College. The school maintains a high stand- 
ard of scholarship, as it aims to fit pupils 
for entering European and American col- 
leges. Along with the mental development, 
there is provision for the social, physical 
and spiritual life of the pupils. The school 
aims to develop the highest character for 
happy living and useful service. 

The enrollment in 1929 was about 320 ? 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



191 



two-thirds of whom were children of Amer- 
ican missionaries. There are about forty 
members on the staff, including the office 
and boarding department members. Music 
is a strong feature in the school. Within 
the past eighteen years, 513 students have 
passed the Trinity College practical exami- 
nations from the first steps to the higher 
local, 235 obtaining honors. 

The Parent-Teachers' Association was or- 
ganized in 1922 and has come to be one of 
the most helpful factors in the life of the 
School. At the monthly meetings of this 
association, papers are presented by spe- 
cialists on various educational problems and 
achievements, and the special problems of 
parents and teachers in Woodstock are dis- 
cussed. For the past six years a sale has 
been held each year under the auspices of 
(Continued on Page 218) 

The Indigenous Church 

J. M. BLOUGH 

When missionaries first go into a new field 
there is of course no indigenous church, but 
they represent the indigenous church of 
another land and their one aim is to establish 
such a church in the new land. The process 
may require a shorter or a longer time, but 
the aim must always be the same. The mis- 
sion is to the church like the scaffold to the 
building; when the building is complete the 
scaffold is torn down. Just so when the 
church is established in 
any place the mission 
should cease to function 
there, especially in the 
work which is properly 
the work of the church. 
A mission should al- 
ways feel about the 
church as John felt 
about Christ when he 
said, "He must increase, 
but I must decrease." 
The mission is tempo- 
rary, the church perma- 
nent. 

In these days great 
emphasis is being 
placed upon the young- 
er churches assuming 
their rightful responsi- 
bility for the work of 



the kingdom in their area. This is commend- 
able, but the necessity for it could have been 
prevented if missions had dealt more wisely 
in the past. The church must be magnified, 
the church must be trained, the church must 
have authority, the church must function in 
her own rights of government, support and 
propagation ; she must be responsible for 
her ministry and for the evangelism of her 
neighbors. 

The method of government in the Church 
of the Brethren can easily be put into opera- 
tion on the mission field. In India in the 
very beginning as soon as there was a group 
of Christians at a mission station they were 
organized into a church ; when there were 
three churches they were organized into a 
district and began to function at once in the 
management of their business. At first mis- 
sionaries had to serve as their ministers and 
elders, and officers of district meeting, but 
this is rapidly changing so that now Indians 
are filling these places of authority and re- 
sponsibility, and doing it with credit, too. 

We rejoice in every effort of the churches 
to carry forth the work of the kingdom. 
Several have made Herculean efforts to 
build their own churches, all take part in 
voluntary evangelism, some members give 
their time freely in supervising schools and 
the town library. For every such effort we 
praise the Lord. Just lately the churches 
have taken over the management of the 

(Continued Back on Page 177) 




Photo by Anetta C. Mow. 



THE ANDADA CHURCH. The members are all day-laborers. They 
have built this church largely by their own efforts. One Moslem man gave 
a gift of 1,000 bricks; Hindus and Rajputs also helped. Membership, 75. 



192 The Missionary Visitor 

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmB. 



June 

1930 



mmtMtMmtMtmm\mrmm*mM 



Looking Toward a 

CHINA 



THE RECORD OF PROGRESS 



##########^##^##^########*##### 



A Short History of Ping Ting 
Chow Station 

F. H. CRUMPACKER 

1908, the Ping Ting Chow Station was 
opened. 

March 11, 1910, the first property was 
bought at Ping Ting Chow. 

May 25, 1910, the Crumpackers moved to 
Ping Ting. 

June 12, 1910, our first preaching services. 

Aug. 31, 1910, Miss Emma Horning joined 
the foreign staff. 

Oct. 15, 1910, Miss Minerva Metzger joined 
the staff. 

Nov. 10, 1910, our regular country itinerat- 
ing was begun. 

March 20, 1911, our Boys' School was 
started, with a teacher and three boys. 

April 17, 1911, our first local baptisms. 
Since then we have baptized in the station 
about 800. Our present membership is 704. 

May 10, 1911, we held our first love feast. 
Four foreigners and three Chinese com- 
muned. 

May, 1912, the mission received as a loan, 
Mr. Chao, of the American Board. 

May 23, 1912, was the beginning of our 
Boys' Orphanage. The experiment lasted 
about ten years. 

July 15, 1912, we opened our first sta- 
tion. It was at LePing. 

Sept. 6, 1912, Frank Heckman with his wife 
and two little girls, joined the Mission staff. 
Though he was with us but a few months he 
was the one man most instrumental in win- 
ning Bro. H. C. Yin, who is now our recog- 
nized Chinese leader for our entire church. 
Smallpox took Bro. Heckman from us Dec. 
of 1912. 

On Sept. 11, 1912, the Ping Ting church 



was organized with six foreigners and two 
Chinese as charter members. 

Oct., 1912, the Girls' School was started at 
Ping Ting Chow. 

Nov., 1913, we had a deputation from the 
home church, Elders H. C. Early and Galen 
B. Royer. 




THIS OLD LADY OF 70 has an only son, her sole 
support. He was caught selling opium and taken to 
prison, leaving her with nothing. We found her half 
starved and frozen. 

The woman's Sunday-school has taken over her 
support as a project. Each Sunday they bring her 
food enough to last for the week. In the afternoon 
the appointed ones take the food to her and give her 
a Gospel lesson. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



193 



In the fall of 1920 a second deputation 
came, Elders J. J. Yoder and J. H. B. Wil- 
liams. Dr. H. J. Harnly of McPherson trav- 
eled with this deputation and was a great 
help to the mission. 

1926, a third deputation came, Elders J. J. 
Yoder and Chas. D. Bonsack. 

All of the deputations helped the work 
more than figures can estimate. 

Nov. 2, 1913, the staff at Ping Ting was in- 
creased. Dr. and Mrs. F. J. Wampler were 
added to the medical de- 
partment, E. D. Vaniman 
and wife to the boys' school, 
and Anna Blough to wom- 
en's country work. 

A Bible training school 
for men was carried on for 
four years. A women's 
training school has been 
conducted since about 1918. 
Many of the women work- 
ers have come through this 
school. 

For a time a junior high 
school was conducted in 
connection with the primary 
school here. Later the mis- 
sion started a high school 
for the entire mission and it 
was located here in 1926. 
Mr. Seese and Mr. B. M. 
Flory both worked in this 
school. 

Those not mentioned 
above who have given time 
to this station are : Dr. Coffman's and Dr. D. 
L. Homing's, Edna Flory, who had been head 
nurse at the hospital since 1918, and Miss 
Bessie Rider and Miss Elizabeth Baker, also 
nurses. Mr. O. C. Sollenberger and wife 
gave several years' service to country evan- 
gelism, Mr. W. Harlan Smith and wife gave 
a year to country evangelism, and Mr. L. S. 
Brubaker and wife were just ready to begin 
work when the foreigners had to evacuate in 
1927. Mr. J. Homer Bright and family came 
to Ping Ting, he as mission builder and later 
as treasurer, and she as head of the women's 
sewing industrial work. Miss Ada Dunning 
was for some years in the women's country 
evangelism department. Miss Lulu Ullom 
was a worker in city, school, and country. 
Miss Mary Schaeffer is the present worker 



among country women. Miss Mary Cline 
and Mr. John Hollenberg each gave a short 
time to the teaching of English in our junior 
high school. I. E. Oberholtzer and family 
were here for a short time in Bible school 
and evangelistic work. Mr. Samuel Bowman 
and family were here a short time in school 
work. 

In the last five years the work of evangel- 
ism has been done largely by the Chinese 
who have taken the lead in tent and out-sta- 




PASTOR YIN AND FAMILY. This is a model family. The wife 
stands in the middle. The eldest son is to her right. He is in high 
school and so is the second boy who stands to his mother's left. The 
third boy is in our higher primary and the little girl is just starting 
in school. They all are happiest when at home together. Their family 
worship is appreciated by all. Pastor Yin was ordained about a year 
ago. He has a wide circle of friends within and without the church. 



tion work and Pastor Yin has had charge at 
the central church. 

The Boys' School that was directed for 
about fifteen years by Mr. Vaniman and 
other foreigners, is being principaled by a 
Chinese leader of our own school. The staff 
are directed entirely by the Chinese principal. 
The Girls' School, though still having a for- 
eigner as principal, has a very Chinese ap- 
pearance, with a staff of teachers mostly of 
our own school and children of our own 
members. 

The hospital has no foreign doctors. The 
two Chinese doctors have kept the standard 
high and in the past year have had a busy 
year, as heavy as any year in the history of 
our work here. 

The Women's Bible School has a good 



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June 

1930 




HOSPITAL STAFF AT PING TING CHOU. Front row. Left to right. Miss Edna Flory of 
Virginia. She is head nurse and also in charge of the Nurses' Training School. Next is Mr. 
Chang. He was for several years the evangelist in the hospital, but later became the account 
keeper and now for several years this has been his job. He also has charge of the servants 
and laundrymen. He buys all local supplies. Next to him is the evangelist. He is one of our 
own schoolboys and has ambitions to spend his life in evangelism. His name is Chiao. 

Second row. First is Dr. Hsu. He is the hospital superintendent and has been with us for 
several years. He is loved by the patients and has a splendid standing in the community. Next 
is Dr. Wang. He is a bit younger but is also a fine doctor. The two were in school together, 
and though one was a year or two ahead of the other it seems not to show in their work, for 
they are a splendid team in their line. Behind is the head Chinese graduate nurse. He is one 
of our own boys and is a splendid Christian, too. He often is heard talking to the very sick 
about trusting in the Lord and praying to him for strength and relief. 



force of several Chinese at work all the time 
on the program of evangelism. 

All of these departments are well housed 
in buildings suited to their needs. With the 
leadership gradually getting into the hands 
of the Chinese we feel there is some hope of 
indigenous leadership yet in this generation. 

The hospital raised locally about three- 
fifths of their budget for 1929. The boys' 
and girls' schools are receiving more each 
year for the support of the children in 
school. The church collections are better 
than any year in the past. In fact, the spirit 
of the place cannot be measured by numbers 
of members, neither by collections, but by 
the attitude of the people all about us toward 
Jesus Christ and towards God. Literally 
hundreds of people secretly believe that what 
we have is what they should have but they 
are still too much afraid of the unsettled 
conditions to take a stand for the church. 
The day of greater hope is dawning for the 
Ping Ting Church. 



Eighteen Years at Liao 

LIAO CHOU 

In June of 1912 the Liao station was 
opened by the coming of George Hilton and 
family. J. H. Bright and family, Anna 
Hutchison and Winnie Cripe arrived in Sep- 
tember of the following year. These several 
workers opened up the educational and 
evangelistic departments. In 1913 Dr. Bru- 
baker and family arrived and began the med- 
ical work. 

Men's Evangelistic 

Brother Bright followed Brother Hilton in 
carrying forward the work of the men's 
evangelistic department. R. C. Flory and 
family came in 1914. In 1919 E. M. Wamp- 
ler and family arrived, but on account of 
sickness it was necessary to leave the work. 
Two years ago Brother Wampler returned 
to Liao. In 1921 I. E. Oberholtzer and family 
were transferred to this station, and in 1929 
O. C. Sollenberger and family arrived. These 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



195 




Men's Ward, Liao Hospital. 



three have now divided up our large country, 
each having charge of the work of certain 
sections. In 1923 the Liao church was built 
and the following year dedicated. Three 
years ago Mr. Chang Tzu Hsiu, of the Pres- 
byterian Mission, came to assist in the work, 
and recently he and his wife were received 
as members into the Church of the Brethren. 
They are doing very satisfactory work. The 
seed is being sown in many quarters and the 
work is gradually making progress. 
Women's Evangelistic 
The women's city evangelistic work, with 



near villages, has been under the charge of 
Anna Hutchison from the beginning. In 1920 
the Women's Bible School was opened with 
Sister Hutchison also in charge. During 
these several recent years two Chinese Chris- 
tian women, Wang Chin Ai and Wang Hsiu 
Jung, have been faithful and valuable help- 
ers both as teachers in the Bible school and 
as helpers in the evangelistic work. The 
school is larger and the present outlook of 
the work is more hopeful than at any previ- 
ous time. 

In 1917 Nettie Senger arrived at Liao and 




CHINA MISSIONARIES' ANNUAL MEETING. Even though managing Clrnese church af- 
fairs is done by a joint delegate body or Joint Committees of Chinese and foreigners, the mis- 
sionaries still try to get together for a meeting once a year. There are things that pertain to 
the foreign group alone. This year three days of prayer and devotional uplift and about one 
day of business was the program. The group that got together in 1929 is shown here. A few 
of the mothers were not permitted to be present. The children enjoy these mission meetings 
wonderfully. 



196 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 




MATIEN CHURCH is a striking example of local Chinese interest. The greater part of this 
church should be credited to Chinese, and not to foreign funds. 



took up the country evangelistic work. In 
1929 Ruth Ulrey was appointed to assist in 
this large field of opportunity. Much seed 
has been sown with encouraging results in 
the changing of lives and the saving of souls, 
especially in the Chin Chou district. 
Boys' School 

In the spring of 1913 J. Homer Bright 
opened the Boys' School, with twenty-four 
boys enrolled. The Boys' School building 
was erected in 1915, and later Samuel Bow- 
man and Norman Seese each in turn had 
charge of this department of the work. Since 
1926 Mr. Tsai Yu has been principal of the 
school, with no foreigner in charge. 
Girls' School 

The Girls' School was opened in 1914 by 
Winnie Cripe, with pupils enrolled. The 
Girls' School at East compound was built in 
1919. Later Miss Cripe opened up the kin- 
dergarten and the coeducational school in 
the city, Mary Cline and Laura Shock each 
in turn taking charge of the Girls' School 
until 1926 when the work was combined at 
one place in the city by the exchange of the 
Boys' and Girls' School buildings. Since 
then Miss Shock has continued to have 
charge of the work. 

Medical Work 

In 1913 Dr. Brubaker opened up this de- 
partment of the work. In 1917 the hospital 
was erected and the following year dedi- 
cated. The same year Mrs. Pollock arrived 
and took up her work as nurse in the new 



hospital. In 1920 Dr. Horning and family 
came to Liao, and he had charge of the hos- 
pital until returning on furlough in 1926, 
when our Christian Chinese, Dr. Wang, took 
charge of the work. 

Developing Chinese Leadership 

SHOU YANG HSIEN 

WALTER J. HEISEY 

Mission work was begun in Shou Yang 
County by a group of independent mission- 
aries before 1900. It was later taken over 
by the English Baptist Mission. Owing to 
the large field being worked by the Baptist 
Mission in China, and the depletion of men 
and money during the world war, arrange- 
ments were made whereby the Church of 
the Brethren Mission should have oversight 
of this field. 

In the summer of 1919 Brother and Sister 
Byron M. Flory, Brother and Sister Walter 
J. Heisey, and Sisters Grace Clapper and 
Mary Schaeffer moved to Shou Yang to 
take over the work. Brother and Sister 
Harlan Smith joined the staff of workers 
in 1921 and later took charge of the work 
during the furloughs of the Heiseys and 
Florys. 

The work of the Girls' School and wom- 
en's evangelistic departments was later su- 
perintended at different times by the follow- 
ing sisters : Valley Miller, Elizabeth Baker, 
Lulu Ullom, Ada Dunning, Mary Cline, 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



197 




Photo by Harlan Smith. 

BROTHER CHAO FU LING, Shou Yang's first dea- 
con, with his family. Brother and Sister Chao were 
installed in the deacon's office in the spring of 1929. 
Sister Chao was baptized a bit more than two years 
ago, and since that time has been making remarkable 
progress in her Christian life. Even though a very 
busy mother she has, with the help of her husband 
and the women evangelists, learned to read In the 
last few months she has been taking a very active 
part in the women's prayer group. She has led the 
meetings several times in a very praiseworthy man- 
ner. It is a joy to see such lives growing in the 
grace and knowledge of the Lord Jesus. The Chao 
family are an earnest, sincere Christian family and 
we thank God for them. 




PAI CHEN HSING, one of SHOU YANG'S faithful 
little Christian women, with her baby girl. This is 
a very precious baby, as it is the tenth and only liv- 
ing child. All the others died before they were a 
month old. But this baby was born in the Mission 
Hospital at Shou Yang, and scientific care of both 
mother and babe are responsible for the happiness 
which this home enjoys with this baby girlie. 








HOSPITAL STAFF IN SHOU YANG COUNTY. They are, left to right: Hsing Lan Chih, first assist- 
ant nurse, trained by Dr. Hsing; Mrs. Doctor Hsing, graduate nurse; Dr. Hsing Yu T'ing, physician in 
charge; Sun Chung Ho, hospital evangelist, also registrar and treasurer; Han Ju Chi, second assistant 
nurse, receiving training. Since this picture was taken Dr. Meng has been added to the staff. 

The success of the hospital work at Shou Yang has been largely due to the practical and patient work of 
Dr. Hsing. No professionally-trained foreigners have been associated with the hospital. The foreigners in 
the station have been simply advisers in matters pertaining to general finances, etc. Dr. Hsing has worked 
under various handicaps. His equipment has been limited, and his buildings generally inadequate for the 
work. Notwithstanding, the work has grown until it has been expedient to add another doctor to the staff. 



198 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 




THE NUCLEUS of a Christian church in Yu county. (Smith.) 



Minneva. Neher and Ruth Ulrey. Sisters 
Clapper, Schaeffer and Neher have had 
charge of the work most constantly. 

During the years 1925-1929 Brother and 
Sister Heisey and Sister Neher have had 
charge of the work most of the time. Broth- 
er and Sister Smith were at the station 
through 1925 and Brother and Sister Byron 
Flory through 1926. After the evacuation 
of foreigners from the interior of China 
in 1927, Sister Minneva Neher and Ruth 
Ulrey returned to the station first, and were 
alone in the work until the Heisey family 
returned in August of 1928. 

Chinese Assume Responsibility 

Every effort has been made to stimulate 
Chinese leadership. While the foreigners 
were in evacuation, the Chinese proved them- 
selves willing and able to assume direct 
responsibility for the work. They main- 
tained the work under exceedingly difficult 
circumstances while the foreigners were 
away from the station. 

Since the spring of 1927 both the Boys' 
and Girls' Schools have had Chinese prin- 
cipals, the foreigners acting only as ad- 
visors. They have maintained the high stand- 
ard of scholarship which the schools had 
established and the interest has been ex- 
ceedingly good, considering the opposition 



on the part of some of the local educational 
and political groups in the government. The 
principals and teachers were all trained in 
missions schools, and were of the highest 
type of Christian character. 

(Continued on Page 236) 




S T STER WANG LING AN on left, and SISTER 

KUNG I TE on right, bearers of the Light to the 
women of Shou Yang. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



199 



Brighter Hopes for the Future 

TAI YUAN 

Tai Yuan is the youngest and smallest sta- 
tion of our mission. We have four mission- 
aries at present and only a few Chinese em- 
ployed by the mission. The major part of 
the work is in the evangelistic field as there 
are many schools of all grades and several 
hospitals, two of which are mission hospitals, 
hence no need for us to duplicate. 

The men's evangelistic work started in 
August 1923 with Rev. H. K. Chao in charge, 
assisted by Minor M. Myers who was work- 
ing with the Young Men's 
Christian Association. In 
the summer of 1924 Miss 
Lulu Ullom and Mrs. Chang 
came to Tai Yuan and 
opened the women's evan- 
gelistic work. And short- 
ly after, the same autumn, 
Mr. and Airs. Ikenberry 
joined those in Tai Yuan 
to work with the Y. M. C. 
A. in student work, reliev- 
ing Mr. Myers for full 
time in the mission. In 
connection with the wom- 
en's work a school for girls 
was started and continued 
for several years with fair- 
ly satisfactory results. 

Through the cooperation of friends and 
the untiring efforts of Pastor Chao, six were 
baptized the first year. Some of these were 
nearly ready for baptism before our mission 
began work in Tai Yuan. Others sowed the 
good seed and we gathered the harvest. 
Some special work was done among boys 
for several years with one of our young 
Christians as leader. This work was dis- 
continued about two years ago because Mr. 
Chang, the director, accepted another posi- 
tion, and funds were short. Some of those 
boys are very friendly to us and our work, 
and we are hoping they will become follow- 
ers of our Christ. 

Mr. C. C. Li succeeded Rev. Chao as pas- 
tor in 1926. At the same time the Myers 
family and Miss Ullom went to America on 
regular furlough, and then for a year Mr. 
and Mrs. Ikenberry gave part time in assist- 



ing the work of the mission. But they, too, 
left in April of 1927, as they were ordered 
out by the American consul. This left the 
Chinese without any missionaries to carry 
on, and some of the time under most trying 
situations, until the fall of 1929 when the 
Myers and Ikenberry families returned. 
Mrs. Chang is still without the help of a 
single lady missionary. 

The Chinese workers carried the responsi- 
bilities of the work in a very creditable man- 
ner during trying times. From the first year 
to the present, each year except two, there 
were those uniting with the church, making 




PASTOR C. C. LI AND FAMILY. Pastor Li has been with our mis- 
sion about seven years, coming from Shantung where he graduated from 
Shantung Christian University. After serving at Ping Ting as the 
hospital evangelist for nearly three years he came to Tai Yuan and has 
served the work here very acceptably during trying times while the mis- 
sionaries were on extended furlough because of the revolution. 



a total of eighty-one baptized. A number of 
very fine contacts have been made with 
homes and individuals whose homes are not 
here in the city, and we are hoping these all 
will bear good fruit for the Master. From 
what I am told, the work of all the churches 
working in Tai Yuan is in better condition 
than it was a year or two ago. We are still 
hoping for better things in the future. 

Our mission does not own property here 
so we have to rent quarters and are handi- 
capped by moving every now and then. We 
are hopeful of having a permanent location 
before so very long. While there are large 
obstacles in the way of our greatest work, 
there are a number of things which are en- 
couraging. Our local group is weakened by 
more than fifty of our members moving out 
of the city but we hope they are bearing 
witness for their Lord wherever they are. 



200 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 




MEN'S EVANGELISTIC GROUP at Shou Yang. Left to right, standing: Ho Lieh Ch'en (head Chinese 
evangelist), Shang Pei Mu, W. Harlan Smith, Li Yin Ch'iao, Walter J. Heisey. Sitting: Chao Fu Ling, 
, Wang Te Ch'en, Sun Chung Ho. Bro. Sun has charge of the evangelistic work in the hospital. 

This group is at present the only group of men working definitely for the promulgation of the Gospel in 
the Shou Yang and Yu counties. They are responsible for the evangelization of 1,253 villages, comprising 
82,483 homes, with a population of 381,996. There are 65 villages with 167 Christians living in them. Since 
the work was opened in 1919, 20 Christians have died. Who is equal for so tremendous a responsibility? 



FROM A GRASS HUT TO ORGANIZED 
CHURCH GROUPS 

(Continued from Page 180) 
removed a year and a half ago, but now 
those same people are becoming very in- 
sistent in their request for a school. 

The outstanding obstructionists to the 
work during the past five years have been 
the Arya Samajists. Through false propa- 
ganda, bitter criticism, unethical methods 
and persecution, they have made it very 
difficult for the carrying on of the work 
in some places. At the very close of the 
year 1929, however, they have been forbidden 
to hold meetings in Raj Pipla State, and one 
of their leading workers has been exported 
from the State. Not only has their propa- 
ganda been stopped to a large extent but 
the people who had been following them 
have discovered their tricks and have turned 
against them ; now where previously our 
people were not welcomed and even kept 
out, people are asking for schools and our 
support in helping them to get schools. 

The work in the Vali Boarding School has 
been curtailed to some extent because of 
shortage of funds. Our number is only 
seventy-five, whereas our equipment would 



care for one hundred boys. We have had 
to refuse a. number of boys because of lack 
of funds. So we might say that the harvest 
truly is ready but the funds are short. 

The Next Five Years 

W. HARLAN SMITH 

The outlook of the Church of the Breth- 
ren mission in China for the next five years 
is as bright as the promises of God and the 
patience of the saints. The work of the mis- 
sion during the past twenty or more years 
has produced a small Church of the Breth- 
ren in China. During the next few years 
this church must increase in power and in- 
fluence, while the mission must decrease in 
the same respect. The spiritual nurture and 
outward development of this young church 
will gradually become the main interest of 
our missionary force. The inevitable ad- 
justments that will need to be made between 
the mission and this growing church will re- 
quire much patience and sympathy, both on 
the part of our missionaries and our good 
friends in America. We are confident that 
our Brethren in America will stand by us 
(Continued on Page 227) 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



201 



mm^im^&im^^s^^&^^^^^&^&m&^^^&^^^&^^^^m&m^&Mm 



Marching Forward in 
AFRICA 

THE RECORD OF PROGRESS 



mmmmmmmwmmm 

Africa During 1929 

H. S. KULP 
THE STAFF 

The number of missionaries on the field at 
the beginning of the year was sixteen. It 
had been the original plan that all of these 
should be on the field for practically the en- 
tire year. Because of ill health it was neces- 
sary for Miss Shisler and Mr. Flohr to take 
their furlough earlier than had been antici- 
pated. Miss Harper left with Miss Shisler 
in February. The Flohrs left in April. The 
staff was distributed for the year as follows : 

At Garkida : Mr. and Mrs. Helser, Mr. and 
Mrs. Beahm, Mr. and Mrs. Heckman (after 
May 1), Dr. and Mrs. Gibbel (until May 1), 
Dr. and Mrs. Robertson, Miss Shisler (until 
February 1), Miss Harper (until February 1). 

At Gardemna : Mr. and Mrs. Flohr (until 
April 1). 

At Lassa : Mr. and Mrs. Kulp. Mr. and 
Mrs. Heckman (until May 1), Dr. and Mrs. 
Gibbel (after May 1). 

Two missionary babies were born during 
the year: Annabelle Flohr, March 14; Philip 
Kulp, October 29. 

EVANGELISM 

The outstanding event in the church life 
on the Africa field in 1929 was the organiza- 
tion of the First District of Africa. The 
Deputation from the Home Church in the 
latter part of 1928 suggested that the organi- 
zation of a District would be the means of 
meeting problems, present and future. The 
District Meeting convened at Garkida on 
February 21, 1929. All the officers excepting 
the moderator were native Bura Christians. 
The mission feels organizing the district is a 
great step forward in development of the 
indigenous church. This, to be truly indige- 



nous, must be self-governing, self-supporting 
and self-propagating. 

Although there were no baptisms during 
the year, a goodly number were added to the 
group under preparation for the rite. Before 
entering this group, they make a public pro- 
fession of their desire to follow Christ. 
Those who are in the church have been find- 
ing themselves and adjusting their lives to 
the social and ethical requirements of this 
new organization. This is a most difficult 
task in the light of their background and the 
existing Bura standards, and there is much 
persecution. The District Meeting appointed 
a committee to study this problem. The eld- 
ers also, in order to more wisely care for 
their flocks, have spent considerable time 
trying to find which native customs may be 
carried over into the church and which ones 
will need to be dropped or changed because 
they are incompatible with New Testament 

standards. 

At Garkida 

There is a strong evangelistic emphasis on 
all the work about the station. Besides the 
prayer meeting, evening classes are held to 
give instruction in Christian truths. In the 
Boys' Boarding School prayer meeting is 
held every evening by the boys. As a result 
of services in the hospital several have ex- 
pressed a desire to become Christians. Spe- 
cial efforts are being made to reach the lep- 
ers in the Leper Colony. The chapel build- 
ing at the Leper Colony has been donated 
by the Garkida church. 

The surrounding district is being reached. 
Week-Day Bible and reading classes are 
held in five villages. These are conducted by 
native Christians who are paid by the native 
church. In eighteen villages regular Sunday 
services are held. For twelve of these the 
native Christians are responsible. 



202 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



At Gardemna 

After Brother and Sister Flohr left for 
furlough Bro. Helser took over the work. 
Hyelandiga Tarfa, the native Christian who 
had been helping at Gardemna, took ill with 
typhoid and was taken to the Garkida hos- 
pital, where he had a long, slow recovery. As 
he asked to have the privilege to attend 
school at Garkida, to get further training, 
two other Christians from Garkida went to 
Gardemna to help in the work. Under the 
supervision of the missionary who visited 
them every week end they continued classes 
for the Christians and also gave some gen- 
eral instruction in reading, writing, and 
arithmetic. There is also a native Christian 
at Gardemna, who dispenses medicine under 
supervision of the doctor at Garkida. Except 
for one shilling a week (25c) which is paid 
to one of them for caring for the mission 
property, all the wages of these native work- 
ers are paid by the native church. Seven 
were added to the Christian group during 
the year. 

At Lassa 

Regular services have been conducted in 
five Margi villages during the year. This 
has been possible only because of the help 
of two native Christians who have come to 
Lassa from Garkida. They, like the mission- 
aries, have had to learn the Margi language. 
For the Bura group, who came to Lassa in 
the wake of the missionaries, two services 
are held weekly. From this group three have 
become Christians during the year. 

EDUCATION 
At Garkida 

The new Boys' School buildings were com- 
pleted in February. Dedication services held 
on February 20 were attended by about 500 
people, of whom 350 were seated in the 
school chapel. Quite a number of govern- 
ment officials have visited the school and 
have been universal in praising the work 
that is being done. The school was inspected 
on April 11 by Mr. Taylor, the Superintend- 
ent of Education for Adamawa Province. In 
his report to the Director of Education for 
Northern Nigeria he said, speaking of the 
Boys' School, that extraordinarily good work 
was being done among the Bura pagans. 
Another outstanding event in the Boys' 
School was the beginning to charge an en- 
trance fee. This was one shilling for those 



who enrolled at the beginning of the term. 
Nearly $30 was collected. When it is re- 
membered that $1 is the wages of an ordi- 
nary laborer for two weeks it will be seen 
that $30 represents quite a sum. The enroll- 
ment in the Boys' School reached 126, of 
whom seventy-eight were boarders. Consid- 
erable progress was made in the teacher- 
training by using pupil teachers. 
Girls' School 

Perhaps the greatest encouragement in our 
educational work for the whole year has 
been the extraordinary response on the part 
of the girls at the opening of the new school 
term on August 5. From fifty to sixty girls 
and young women began coming to school. 
Strenuous efforts were made on the part of 
the Garkida staff to meet the opportunity 
which this revival in interest in education 
among the women presented. A suitable 
building for the Girls' School has been 
planned and is under construction. 
At Lassa 

The opening of the Lassa School dates 
properly from July 29, 1929. A Primer was 
prepared and an edition of 100 copies was 
printed at Lassa on the multigraph. These, 
together with a series of charts, are the only 
school materials available in the Margi dia- 
lect. By the end of the year the school en- 
rollment had reached twenty-four. A plan 
for three school buildings was made. Two 
of these have been erected. 

MEDICAL WORK 
At Garkida 

The outstanding events in the medical 
work were the completion of the Ruth Royer 
Kulp Memorial Hospital and the opening of 
the Garkida Leper Colony. 

On June 15, 1929, five years after the death 
of the one of whom the hospital is a memori- 
al, the first operation was performed in the 
newly finished surgical building. This build- 
ing is the first permanent building to be 
erected by the Africa Mission. It is on a 
concrete foundation and has a metal roof. 
It contains the operating room, sterilizing 
and sterile linen rooms, maternity room, lab- 
oratory, a receiving office, drug room, store 
room and a room for white patients. The 
Sisters' Aid Societies and the congregation 
at Pittsburgh have fully financed the build- 
ing and its equipment. The Ruth Royer Kulp 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



203 



Memorial consists of the above mentioned 
buildings, and in addition, two wards with a 
capacity for sixty patients, a doctors' resi- 
dence and a nurses' residence. 

Encouraged by promise of liberal financial 
grants from the local government and from 
the British Empire Leprosy Association, the 
mission decided to open a Leper Colony at 
Garkida. The government has set aside 500 
acres for farming purposes for the colony. 
September 7, 1929, will probably mark the 
date of the opening of the colony. There 
are at present some fifty lepers in the colony. 
The total number of treatments in the hos- 
pital year, 41,859, will probably not be sur- 
passed for a long time. 

Some time was spent in research, so that 
more and more we are learning what are the 
specific causes of the sickness in the land. 
With this knowledge the diseases can be 
treated more effectively. 

Mention should be made of the fact that 
the doctors have been called many times by 
government officials, traders, railroad sur- 
veyors, and by neighboring missions. 
At Lassa 

Dr. Gibbel was stationed at Lassa from 
March until November. The rest of the 
year the medical work was carried on by na- 
tive dispensers. There were thirty-two 
minor operations performed and some 4,500 
treatments were given during the year. 

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

In order to accomplish its purpose in es- 
tablishing a native church, the mission has 
the tremendous task of providing a literature 
for the people. The first essential for this 
task is to master the native language. Con- 
siderable work has been done on a Bura 
Dictionary and Grammar. Three books were 
practically completed for the press — "Chris- 
tian Truths and Practices," a translation of 
St. John's Gospel, and a book of native folk 
tales and fables. 

INDUSTRIAL AND AGRICULTURAL 
WORK 

The industrial and agricultural work is 
carried on at the Lassa and Garkida stations 
in connection with the school work. It af- 
fords one of our biggest opportunities, for 
the people are all agriculturists, but the ag- 
ricultural possibilities of the country are as 
yet undeveloped. A plot has been secured at 



Garkida for agricultural educational pur- 
poses. Experimental work has been done 
with citrus and other fruits. Exotic varieties 
of rice and cotton are being experimented 
with, both at Garkida and Lassa. Flourish- 
ing vegetable gardens are kept up during the 
dry season by means of irrigation. Mr. 
Heckman, who has charge of this work at 
Garkida, has been busy with building, but 
in spite of that considerable progress has 
been made. Instruction is given in weaving, 
spinning, carpentry, and smithing. 

Christians in Africa 

CLARA HARPER 

In the fall of 1922 when Brother Stover 
Kulp and Brother A. D. Helser began work 
among 85,000 Bura people, every phase of 
the work had to be started from the very 
bottom. Good foundations have been laid 
for growth and expansion. 

Through the schools, the evangelistic 
work and hospital we feel that some three 
thousand of these people have been reached. 
In 1926 we began to see some of the seeds 
ripen. Thirty young men took their stand 
for the Master, declaring to their relatives 
and friends that they wanted the new way. 
In 1927 sixteen more took this stand. In 

1928 one hundred and twenty-five and in 

1929 ten took this step. It is not easy for 
these people to turn their backs on the old 
customs and traditions and follow the new 
way. Much persecution is ahead of them. 
We are glad many are standing this perse- 
cution and are going forward. Others are 
measuring the steps and will soon come out 
and stand on the side of Jesus. After they 
take the covenant they are given a period 
of definite teaching before they are baptized. 

A large group of people have heard the 
message of the saving power of Jesus Christ. 
Some have accepted Jesus as their Savior 
and many others are living better lives. We 
can see a general trend for better and 
cleaner living. Many are trying to follow 
the example of Jesus Christ but have not 
publicly confessed him. 

"David Livingstone said to his countrymen, 
'Do you carry out the work that I have be- 
gun. I leave it with you.' Was it not some- 
thing like this the Master said to His disci- 
ples ?" 



204 



The Missionary Visitor 



une 
1930 



" In Sunny Nigeria " 

GARKIDA 

ALBERT D. HELSER 

In September, 1922, the General Mission 
Board called H. Stover Kulp and Albert 
D. Helser to Elgin and commissioned them 
to open a mission in Africa. Garkida was 
the first station to be established by these 
brethren. They arrived at Garkida on 
March 8, 1923. Many tasks awaited them. 
A new language needed to be learned and 
written, houses had to be built, sick people 
needed to be treated, Gospels waited to be 
translated, and text-books needed to be 
provided for a school. 

During First Two Years 

On March 17, 1923, the site was con- 
secrated for the first building of the Africa 
Mission of the Church of the Brethren. 
Sickness made it necessary for the brethren 
to be away from the station for more than 
half of the remaining months of that first 
year. 

Early in December, Mrs. Kulp and Mrs. 
Helser arrived at Garkida and two mis- 
sionary homes were established. It was 
during this month that the first gospel mes- 
sages were given without the aid of inter- 
preters. The first regular school was opened 
in December, 1923. In February, 1924, Dr. 
and Mrs. Homer L. Burke, the first medical 
family of the Africa Mission, reached Gar- 
kida. On April 17, 1924, the first love feast 
of the Church of the Brethren was held 
in Africa. A little mud hospital was dedi- 
cated on May 11, 1924, and it soon became 
known as " the city of refuge " for the 
sick and suffering of that whole country- 
side. 

" The blood of the missionary is the seed 
of the church." On June 15, 1924, Ruth 
Royer Kulp laid down her life for Christ 
and the Church and for her Bura people 
whom she dearly loved. While the hearts 
of her husband and her fellow-workers were 
saddened, it was through this offering of 
life that the Bura people began to under- 
stand something of Christ's dying love. Her 
body with that of her little son was tenderly 
laid to rest on an eastern slope near our 
missionary dwellings. 

A little mud church-school building was 
dedicated on August 3, 1924. During this 



year a First Reader was written, Mark was 
translated and other materials were pre- 
pared. 

In January, 1925, Mr. and Mrs. William 
M. Beahm, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence C. 
Heckman, and Mr. and Mrs. Floyd E. 
Mallott and son arrived at Garkida. In 
December, 1926, Misses Clara Harper and 
Sara Shisler, and Dr. and Mrs. J. Paul 
Gibbel reached Garkida. Mr. and Mrs. Earl 
W. Flohr and family and Mrs. Kulp arrived 
at Garkida in January, 1927. 




CHILDREN OF ALL COLORS will readily mix 
with one another. Here you see three missionaries' 
children and one little black child. They have been 
playing and enjoying themselves. By name they are 
Esther Mae Helser, John Zowoka, Jane Robertson, 
and Kathleen Gibbel. John has little opportunity to 
play with other children of his size, and so he es- 
pecially enjoyed this opportunity. These little girls 
seldom have an opportunity to play with such a nice 
little black boy, either. 



Two New Stations 

Early in 1927, the Kulps left Garkida to 
open a new station at Lassa (first located 
at Dille), and Mr. Mallott left Garkida to 
open a new station at Gardemna. Dr. and 
Mrs. Russell L. Robertson reached Garkida 
late in 1927. Early in 1928, the Flohrs left 
Garkida to take over the work of the Gar- 
demna station. In 1929, the Gibbels left 
Garkida to take up work at the Lassa 
station. 

Evangelism 

The work at Garkida has been more or 
less divided into five departments — evangel- 
istic, medical, educational, industrial and 
literature. All overlap and yet each is dis- 
tinct. A missionary is often asked to work 
in several of these departments. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



205 




**#* 



THIS LEPER COLONY CHURCH is a project of the Garkida church. The plans were drawn 
by a committee from the church and it is being paid for by the regular Sunday offerings. A 
part of the labor was donated by the Christian group. Among the lepers who have been under 
treatment for some time are two women who have accepted Christ. The majority of the lepers, 
however, come from a distance and will receive their first knowledge of salvation through the 
services held in this building. 



The evangelistic motive is what takes 
missionaries to Africa. Not only is this note 
dominant in the direct evangelism, but it 
can be heard and seen at work in the hos- 
pital and the school as well as in the field 
and shop and literature work. The local 
church was built in the village by the local 
people without foreign help. All who accept 
Christ promise in their pledge to him to 
bear the message of his love and saving 
power to others. Some Sundays as many 
as forty go into the outlying villages to tell 
the glad story of salvation through Christ. 
The local church gives part support to eight 
native workers. One of these is at Lassa, 
two at Gardemna, and five go out to the 
villages near Garkida. The plan is not to 
baptize people quickly but to teach and to 
teach. Even after converts are baptized the 
regular class instruction continues. The first 
four were baptized on June 15, 1927, just 
three years after Sister Ruth Rover Kulp 
laid down her life in Africa. To date, more 
than twenty have been baptized at Garkida 
and more than one hundred have made their 
public covenant to follow Christ until death. 

The Medical Program 

From the first day at Garkida medical 
work has been done. Many who have been 
slow to listen, come eagerly to see what 



God's people do to an old filthy ulcer or 
to a hopeless leper. A number testify how 
they first believed through seeing this min- 
istry of love. The medical work is done 
as unto Christ, for he said, " INASMUCH 
AS YE DO IT UNTO THE LEAST OF 
THESE YE DO IT UNTO ME." The 
Sisters' Aid Society of the Church has made 
it possible to build the Ruth Royer Kulp 
Memorial Hospital. More than forty thou- 
sand treatments were given in this hospital 
during the past twelve months. The first 
operation was performed in the new oper- 
ating room on June 15, 1929, just five years 
after the one for whom the hospital is 
named made the supreme sacrifice for the 
cause. A leper camp has recently been 
opened, and already some of the lepers have 
given their lives to Christ. The government 
is tremendously interested in and most sym- 
pathetic to the medical program. 

Educational Work Ranks High 

The educational work is very promising. 
Most of our Christians have come to the 
church by way of the school. More than 
two hundred boys and girls have attended 
school long enough and regularly enough to 
be enrolled. From these we expect to get 
our native leaders who will carry on the 
great work. Boys' school buildings were 



206 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
3930 



erected in 1928 and girls' school buildings 
are being erected this year. The educa- 
tional work has been given first class rating 
by the government inspectors. We are 
happy to see the fervent, evangelistic spirit 
manifest on every side in the school. 

Industrial Work and Religion 

That " it is hard to get a hungry man to 
accept Christ " is as true in Africa as any- 
where. Our industrial department has not 
only been helping the people to weave wider 
cloth and build better houses, but new foods 
have been introduced, such as sugar cane, 
tomatoes, pawpaws, bananas, mangoes and 
better varieties of rice. Naturally the peo- 
ple look for the motive which prompts such 
help, and when they find that the motive is 
brotherly love and not gain, they glorify 
God who sent his people to live amongst 
them. 

Christian Literature Needed 

Christian literature is a tremendous power 
for good. Several missionaries have given 
considerable time to this important field. 
Bible translations are most valuable to 
young converts. To be able to answer 
scoffing by reading from God's Word, is a 
great witness. While only comparatively 
few can read, hundreds can listen. The 
growing young church must have Christian 



books to help it. The literature department 
is earnestly trying to meet this need. 

Christ is all in all and as we work we 
try to live him. Our deepest satisfaction is 
when we see men and women and boys and 
girls follow him whom to know is life and 
peace and joy. 

Among the Margi People 

LASSA 

H. STOVER KULP 

In March, 1927, a mission station was 
opened at Dille about 70 miles east of Gar- 
kida, in the Margi tribe. Rev. and Mrs. 
H. Stover Kulp started the work there. 
Dille is situated among hills with a large 
mountain near by. Among the rocks in the 
mountain, leopards made their abode. Their 
roars at night brought fear to many hearts. 
During the year we were at Dille two chil- 
dren were taken by leopards. Although the 
location at Dille was a beautiful one, it was 
soon discovered that it would not be satis- 
factory for a permanent mission station 
owing to the lack of water. The stream 
was a mile away from the village and was 
dry for four or five months of the year. 
The natives dug holes in the dry stream 
(See Next Page) 




WHEN THE BATTERY RUNS COMPLETELY DOWN in the African bush, sometimes one 
has to call the roll of ideas to get by the difficulty. After having spent some four hours trying 
to start this Ford by pulling, cranking, and other ways, we finally hit on the idea of recharg- 
ing the battery by turning the generator from the hind wheel of a bicycle. It was surprising 
how quickly results came— only a matter of ten minutes until there was enough "juice" in the 
battery to run the engine. A half hour was enough to run it without turning the generator. 
Necessity is surely the mother of invention. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



207 



The Gospel Accepted Gladly 

GARDEMNA 

CLARENCE C. HECKMAN 

It was in the summer of 1926, that the mis- 
sion first thought of opening a station at 
Gardemna. A site of about ten acres in size 
was located and applied for through the reg- 
ular channels. In the early part of 1927 Bro. 
Floyd Mallott went to Gardemna to start the 
work. This meant that he must build a 
house and out-buildings, get acquainted with 
the people, interest them in the Gospel and 
encourage them to have trust in him. Bro. 
Mallott was handicapped by being alone, 
Sister Mallott having gone to the homeland 
with their son. It was a lonely post and Bro. 
Mallott faced it with great courage. 

He stayed there one year until he was due 
for furlough. He did a real piece of work 
there. When he left, there were two men 
who had said they wanted to follow Jesus. 

Very early in 1928 Brother 
and Sister Flohr and children 
took up the work. They were 
accompanied by a native Christian 
and his wife, from Garkida. There 
was further building to do and 
starting of school and Christian 
teaching. Brother a n d Sister 
Flohr accomplished a great deal 
in the year they were there. At 
least twelve took the step and be- 
came Christians. Because of health 
reasons Brother Flohr's went on 
furlough early in 1929 and left 
many friends needing their help. 

In the middle of 1929 Bro. Hel- 
ser was given charge of Gardemna 
station and he went down each 
fortnight to hold services there. 
He was able to carry on the work 
with the help of Hyelandiga Tarfa, who had 
been trained largely by Bro. Flohr. At 
the end of 1929 Bro. Helser was due for 
furlough and Bro. Heckman was assigned 
to carry on the work in much the same 
manner as it had been done by Bro. Helser. 

Dika Waksha and Wadu Shelangwa had 
been taken down from Garkida to assist 
while Bro. Helser had charge and at the 
present time they are doing good service 
there for their Master. There are about 
twenty-five folks in the process of becoming 



Christians who need our help and prayers. 
During the year that Bro. Flohr's were at 
Gardemna the native Christians, with the 
assistance of village men and guided by Bro. 
Flohr, built an excellent native church. It 
was built without cost to the station and 
represents a coordinated effort on the part 
of all. 

AMONG THE MARGI PEOPLE 

(From Previous Page) 
bed and were able to get water once a day. 
The people were not at all sure of us 
at first. They had had very little contact 
with white people. They had never seen 
a white woman before. Their only contact 
with white people had been with govern- 
ment officials. They soon began bringing 
us their court cases to settle and we nad 
to convince them that that was not our 
work. They soon became interested in our 
building and helped us put up our houses. 




A CHRISTIAN GROUP AT GARDEMNA. This group in 
eludes part of those at Gardemna who have accepted Christ and 
are preparing for baptism. In the center is Brother Heckman, 
who is in charge of the station. The native-built church is in 
the background. 



First two round huts were built, one to be 
used as a temporary dispensary and the 
other as a temporary school building. We 
lived in these until our residence was built. 

From the beginning we did dispensary 
work. Mrs. Kulp had charge of this. It 
was appreciated by the people and helped 
win many friends. There was an average 
of from ten to twelve patients and many 
days there would be more than twentv. 

After about nine months of language 

(Continued on Page 265) 



208 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 

1930 



mmm\mmkmmmmmmmm 



m*mktmm 



With Our Brethren in 
SCANDINAVIA 

THE RECORD OF PROGRESS 



The Work in Sweden 

J. F. GRAYBILL 

The work in Sweden is forging ahead 
through all the difficulties and disadvantages 
attending the work. It is still up-hill work. 

The Norrises arrived, three in number, the 
latter part of August, and one week later 
Sister Buckingham left for America. Since 
here the Norrises have added one more to 
their number. What a help in the work 
when these boys grow up ! Pastor and Sis- 
ter Norris have been busy with the study of 
the language and their efforts are crowned 
with being able to converse in Swedish and 
Bro. Norris has several times preached in 
Swedish. 

The work has been carried on along the 
same line as before, with Sunday-school, 
Y. P. D., Aid Society, Junior Society, preach- 
ing and evangelistic work. However, the 
depressing financial and industrial condition 
has its visible effect on church work. There 
is a battle on for bread. This takes much of 
the life out of religious work and makes it 
a dead pull. 

The Malmo Church 

The first preaching by the Church of the 
Brethren in Sweden was done by Brother 
Hope in 1885. The first organization was ef- 
fected in 1888 and located at Limhamn, then 
a village five miles west of Malmo. A mis- 
sion house, including living quarters for the 
preacher, was erected. Services were also 
held in Malmo, which was at first considered 
a mission point and was shortly afterward 
organized into a church. 

During Brother and Sister Vaniman's stay 
in Sweden the mission at Malmo developed 
and supplanted the work in Limhamn so 
there were two organizations, one in Lim- 
hamn and one in Malmo. However, Brother 



Vaniman's feeble health compelled them to 
return to the States, leaving the work here 
without leadership for six years, which was 
very unfortunate. 

In Malmo halls were rented and the mis- 
sion moved all over the city. Upon our ar- 
rival in 1911 the services were held in a room 
ten by twelve feet, on the second floor of a 
house on a back street. 

The members lived mostly in Limhamn at 
this time. The Russellites had made inroad, 
not sparing the flock. At one time fifteen 
of the members left the church and united 
with the Russellites. This was quite a shock 
to the work, and as far as Limhamn is con- 
cerned the church never recovered from this 
shock. 

About 1912 or 1913 these two churches 
were again consolidated under the name, 
Malmo Church. We tried to secure better 
quarters for the work, which was very diffi- 
cult however, and finally almost impossible. 
The work looked promising. We had a large 
Sunday-school and a live wire junior society 
and young people's society, so arrangements 
were made to have permanent quarters. This 
resulted in the erection of a church which 
was dedicated in January, 1924. At the same 
time the mission house in Limhamn was sold 
and the money applied on the new church 
in Malmo. 

We have a centrally located plant on a 
prominent corner lot, with a good outward 
appearance and comfortably and convenient- 
ly arranged interior. The first floor contains 
a main audience room with a seating capac- 
ity of 400. In the rear, between the two en- 
trance doors, are three class rooms, and 
above these rooms a gallery with a seating 
capacity of 100. The main church has a ca- 
pacity of 600. 



June 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



209 




Top: MINISTERS IN THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN, SWEDEN. 
DEACONS IN SWEDEN. 



Bottom: SOME OF THE 



The first floor of the annex along the other 
street contains an audience room with a seat- 
ing capacity of 150, used for prayer meetings, 
the beginners' Sunday-school, and junior 
work, also a reading room, a pastor's study, 
a small room for the janitor and a kitchen. 
The second floor contains a roomy parson- 
age, and the third floor an apartment of two 
small rooms and kitchen which is rented out. 

The following is the cost of this plant 
which is the property of the Church of the 
Brethren. (Figures given below are kroner, 
the Scandinavian monetary unit, worth 26.8 
cents:) 

The plot of ground kr. 25,424.00 

The building and equip kr. 129,260.00 

Total kr. 154,684.00 



A good cellar is under the entire building, 
which is rented out for storage and work- 
shop and for which we realized 2,300.00 
kroner in rent. The total rent for the year 
amounts to over 3,000.00 kroner. 

The property is held in trust by the Gen- 
eral Mission Board. The plant is a credit to 
the church, a monument of the faith once 
delivered to the saints and an open door for 
all who desire to worship God in holiness and 
hear his word preached unto the salvation of 
souls. 

We have good equipment. This is neces- 
sary, but not of most importance. We need 
the grace of God and the guidance of the 
Holy Spirit to perform the Lord's work. We 
do not see the results we have prayed for. 

(Continued on Page 262) 



210 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 

1930 



mm 



LIFE STORIES 



VISITS WITH OUR MISSIONARIES 



mm 



A Visit With Dhanjibhai, an Aged Saint of India 



ANNA E. LICHTY 



SALAAM, salaam! May I just sit on 
the floor as is our custom in India? 
I am so thankful for the privilege of 
visiting the dear brethren in United States. 
The church in America is very dear to us 
in India, for she helped us to find Christ by 
sending missionaries to us. 

" Oh, you have heard about my palm 
trees? Well, let me tell you how I found 
Christ and what he has done for me. I 
was a wicked sinner — a heathen that wor- 
shiped idols, and very zealous in my prac- 
tice of heathen ceremonies. I was fairly 
well-to-do. I had a hundred tadi palm trees 
on my farm. They brought me a liberal 
income for I tapped them yearly and sold 
the sap which they yielded. The juice of 
the tadi palm ferments soon after it is ex- 
posed to the air and produces an intoxicat- 
ing drink. So I sold liquor and enjoyed 
drinking it also. But when McCann Saheb 
came to our village and preached Christ I 
realized that I was on the wrong road. I 
wanted Jesus Christ as my teacher and 
Savior. I accepted him and found salvation 
in him. My life has been full of joy and 
blessing ever since. 

"What about my palms? They are stand- 
ing there yet, tall and stately as ever. But 
I have not tapped one since the day Jesus 
came into my heart. With my chief source 
of income cut off, did I become a poor man? 
Did Christianity reduce me to poverty? O, 
no, the Lord has blessed me abundantly. 
Even when famine threatened we had suf- 
ficient to keep us from starving. 

" With Christ in my heart and Christ in 
my life I was so happy I could not refrain 



from testifying wherever I went. But I was 
an illiterate man. I could not read God's 
word that contained such wonderful truths. 
My children were small and could not read. 
As they grew old enough I sent them to the 
mission boarding school. I wanted them to 
have an education. Once I went into the 
courthouse with my Bible when court was 
in session. They recognized me as an ig- 
norant Bhil and spoke sharply to me. In 
fact, they were about to thrust me out. 
But I said, ' I am God's messenger. This 
is his word, his message. I will leave this 
book for you to read. I will return in a 
week and hear what you read.' 

" Once in my early Christian life I made 
a great blunder on a Sunday morning. 
When I was grazing my cow I noticed some 
weeds growing in my cotton field. I stooped 
and pulled a few, when suddenly I realized 
that it was the Lord's day and I was dese- 
crating it. How could I right the wrong? 
To me it seemed but right that I replant 
the weeds I had pulled and then hasten off 
to the preacher and confess. And thus I 
did. 

" I determined from the time I became a 
Christian, to give systematically to the Lord. 
When he was constantly showering blessings 
upon my family and me, why should I not 
return something to express my apprecia- 
tion and love of him? So I put a chalk 
mark around my grain bin, marking it into 
two equal divisions. Our grain bins in India 
are large earthern receptables which we 
keep in our houses. The average bin con- 
tains about fifteen bushels of grain. When 
the bin is full it is closed at the top. The 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



211 




THE HOME OF DHANJIBHAI in the village of Taropa. The school group stands in front of 
the house. Nagar, his wife and his son, teach in the school. 



grain is taken from the bin through an 
opening near the bottom. Two or three bins 
of this size full of grain may be found in 
what we would consider a well-to-do farm- 
er's house. One of my bins was equally 
divided into two divisions. The grain below 
the chalk mark belonged to the Lord. When 
the grain in the bin had sunk to the level 
of the chalk mark I would pay into the 
Lord's treasury the amount equal to the 
value of the grain. I continued that plan 
for a number of years. Then I tried a new 
plan which I think is better. I dedicated a 
field to the Lord. The proceeds of that field, 
above expenses, are given to the Lord. The 
cotton grows ranker and the kafnr corn 
yields more gram in that field than any 



other. In a good year I am able to give as 
much as Rs. 45 ($15) to the Lord. 

" O, the Lord has blessed me abundantly 
all these years. I could not enumerate all 
my blessings. They are too many. My chil- 
dren, five of them, have grown to manhood 
and womanhood, have married and have 
children of their own. Some of them are 
leaders in the church. Now I am an old 
man. Wife and I are awaiting the Lord's 
summons to come home. We are eager to 
meet our Lord face to face and serve him 
more perfectly over there. 

" Now I must go. I am glad for this little 
visit with you. Good-bye. God bless you." 




DHANJIBHAI, standing between Brethren J. J. Yoder and 
Charles D. Bonsack when they were on deputation to India in 
1927. 



His Hands 

The hands of Christ 

Seem very frail, 
For they were broken 

By a nail. 
But only they reach 

Heaven at last 
Whom these frail, broken 

Hands hold fast. 

John Richard Moreland. 



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June 

1930 



Great Hearts in the Mountains 



MRS. MABEL HERSCH 



Yes, we have a jolly time at the Church of 
the Brethren Industrial School when the 
snow comes. Last Christmas was more beau- 
tiful and enjoyable because of this wonderful 
blanket of white, covering hill and valley. 
Several of our boys made little sleds, to 
which they hitched our loyal Prince and Dia- 
mond, and the children took turns riding 
around the buildings and on the playground, 
singing as they went. 

At Christmas some of our workers and 
boys and girls went to five of our preaching 
points and gave a Christmas program. 

In January, when Bro. S. A. Harley held 
our series of meetings, about twenty young 
people stood for Christ. Our pastor, Bro. 
Knight, conducted a several weeks' training 
class for these young people. 

Recently, when we had a missionary pro- 
gram on India, one of our girls said, "I'd like 
to be a missionary sometime." 

If you visit us in the summer you will 
find a busy group as we pick and can the 
cherries, berries, peaches and other fruits 
and vegetables, to the number of about 
forty-five hundred quarts. In the winter, too, 
when the snow and cold are all about us, we 
are busy. We killed, and canned or cured, 
a beef, a sheep, and twenty hogs. Our girls 
have been making aprons, dresses, rugs, pil- 
low tops, comforters and different kinds of 
fancy work. Some of these we have sold ; the 
proceeds of which were 
sent to the Mission Board, 
and others we have here 
yet to sell. Though cold 
winds blow and chill 
rains fall, our eight hun- 
dred young chicks grow 
sturdy and strong. Our 
neighbors say, "They are 
the prettiest I ever see'd." 
Through the month of 
March our hens gave us 
an average of about one 
hundred and twenty-five 
eggs a day. 

In the picture you may 




WINTER VIEW of Greene Co. School Buildings. 

see Lina, a kind-hearted, grey-haired lady, 
who has lived and toiled all her life in the 
mountains. She is standing by the log house 
where she, her sister and other relatives, live. 
Her sister is almost blind and partially in- 
sane. Lina has never been married, but has 
toiled and raised more than a half dozen 
children who were left dependent upon her. 
One day she came to our clothing bureau 
and bought some clothing for herself and rel- 
atives. She gave me a dollar and half and 
said, "This is all I have today, but I want you 
to take out fifty cents for the church. I 
have been a member for more than a year 
and have not given any money to the Lord, 
and I don't think that is right." 




LINA, a kind-hearted, grey -haired lady 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



213 



Wh 



at s in 

WINNIE 



WHAT is your name, little boy? 
Come over here and sit on my lap 
and I'll tell you about some of my 
little friends in China. Oh, your name is 
John. Most of the Johns I know were 
pretty good men and the one among Jesus' 
twelve helpers whom he especially loved had 
this name too. Our Chinese Christians love 
the names John and Paul and often call 
their own little boys by these names hoping 
that they may grow to be useful and won- 




A BUNDLE OF MISCHIEF is this wee lassie. 
Wang Su Lh "in. Her parents are both Christians. 
Her father has been postmaster at Shou Yang for a 
number of years and her mother taught for awhile 
in the Shou Yang Girls' School. 



derful men like John and Paul were. Our 
Chinese minister, Bro. Yin, of Ping Ting 
Chou, has three boys and two of them he 
named Paul and John. His oldest boy he 
named before he loved Jesus as he does 
now so he did not think of naming him 
after one of the men of the Bible. He 
named him " Post," which meant he hoped 
his boy would be strong. These boys are 
all going, to school now and we hope they 
will become good Christian men and perhaps 
preachers like their father. 

Our little boys and girls in China have 
very different names from those you Amer- 
ican boys and girls have. Their names all 
have meanings. You will think them strange 
when I tell vou about some of them. Some- 



a Name? 

E. CRIPE 

times they are just called the first, second, 
third or fourth boy or girl. Sometimes a 
father and mother want a little boy or girl 
very much and then when it is born it is 
called " Wanted," or when they are poor 
and have several children if another baby is 
born it is called " Xot Wanted." Every 
Chinese father and mother want a little boy 
of their own and if only little girls are born 
they are greatly disappointed. I know one 
home where they had three girls and when 
the third one came they named her " Stole 
Your Brother." Now a little boy baby has 
been born to them and they are very happy. 
I know another mother who wanted a little 
boy baby very much and when her little 
girl was born she named her " Want Hap- 
piness," then the next baby was a boy and 
she named him " Have Happiness." 

A very strange thing happened in the 
home of one of my neighbors in China. For 
many years this man and his wife had 
wanted a little boy and when at last they 
had one they gave him a queer name. They 
called him " Homely Girl." Now you could 
not guess why they did this, could you? 
Well, I will tell you. They did not know 
about our Heavenly Father as a true God 
who loves and cares for us, but they prayed 
to paper gods in their home and to gods 
made of wood and stone in the temples. 
They knew these could not protect them 
from all the evil spirits which they believed 
were constantly about them in the air, so 
they tried to find a plan to keep the spirits 
from harming their little boy in order that 
he would not get sick and die. They thought 
spirits did not care for girls and if they could 
make them think their boy was a girl he 
would be safe. So, the first thing they did 
was to name this fine little boy "Homely 
Girl/' then they cut pieces out of the lower 
part of each of his ears. Then they thought 
the spirits would not want him. If they 
had known how to pray to Jesus to take care 
of him this would not have happened. 

Sometimes the Chinese children have very 
beautiful names, as names of flowers, names 
of great men, and names which mean they 



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June 
1930 



should have wisdom, grow strong, pure and 
good. They also love to play as much as 
American children do, only most of them 
don't know many games until we teach 
them. They often play they are attending 
a wedding and you would just laugh to see 
how they take outer garments, ankle-bands, 
caps or anything of bright color, off each 
other to dress up the bride and groom, then 
beat on an old tile, iron kettle or anything 
they can find for their music at the grand 
wedding. 

We have had good times at our kinder- 



garten, sometimes playing games or singing, 
or sitting about the big circle telling stories. 
Sometimes we all get very quiet as we talk 
about the Heavenly Father, of all he does 
for us and what he wants us to do, and 
then we bow our heads and talk to him. 
There are still many children and their 
parents in China, who do not know Jesus. 
The government is taking their idols away 
and they do not know now to whom to 
pray. I am glad to go back to tell them 
there is a true God and that Jesus loves 
them. "Don't you want to help me, John?" 



The Ruth Royer Kulp Hospital 

DR. RUSSELL L. ROBERTSON 



YOU'RE mistaken. I'm not soliciting 
for money in this evening's talk. Mis- 
sionaries have more things to thank 
you for than to beg you for. This fine, 
large hospital, one of the best in Northern 
Nigeria is all paid for, thanks to the good 
sisters of the Church of the Brethren. 

While I stay with you a short time I 
shall tell about some of the folks connected 
with the hospital who have made impres- 
sions on me. Being a hospital, and es- 
pecially because of its location in Africa, 
touching and emotional incidents occur 
almost daily. To begin with, Dr. Burke, 



Dr. Gibbel, Mr. Flohr and Mr. Heckman 
all gave of their best in its planning and 
construction. All of you know one or more 
of these missionaries. 

At present, one of the best living testi- 
monies of the part a hospital plays in the 
program of a mission, is Madika, the hos- 
pital laundress. It has been more than two 
years ago since she, a poor, sick, wretched 
looking woman hobbled into the hospital. 
One would have said then that she was 
at least sixty years old and past her years 
of usefulness. She had a large ulcer on 
each leg, a chronic case of bronchitis, and 




.fhoto b\ 



RUTH ROYER KULP MEMORIAL HOSPITAL. A close-up view of the yard and ulcer 
dressing veranda. Patients are sitting on the ledge of veranda. Doctor's horse is saddled ready 
for trip. In the foreground is a native assistant dressing a yaws ulcer which involves all of the 
right arm. The doctor is burning dirty papers and dressings. On this veranda in 1929, 24,210 
ulcers were dressed. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



215 



a rupture or hernia the size of your head. 
Her daughter, Diaga, came along to cook 
the meals. 

After a few weeks, when the ulcers were 
cured, Madika asked for an operation for 
the hernia. This was refused because of her 
poor physical condition and the bronchitis. 
But still she remained around the hospital. 
When we suggested that she go home she 
replied that she had no home. Her hus- 
band had turned her out because she was 
not able to work. Her daughter, Diaga, 
two or three calabashes and about a peck 
of guinea corn were all she had left. She 
repeatedly begged the doctor to perform 
the operation. This was always refused. 
We did not possibly see how she could 
undergo a major operation and live. Finally, 
when the danger was explained to her, she 
said, "Please do something; I cannot live 
with this suffering. I would rather be dead 
than alive in this condition. You do the 
operation ; if I die, all right, if I live, may 
God be praised." 

After a few more days of special prepara- 
tion and nourishing we undertook the oper- 
ation, knowing full well that if the patient 
lived it would be God's hand rather than 
the surgeon's that saved her. After the 
usual prayer she was as calm and cooper- 
ative during the extended operation as the 
most intelligent of you would be. Then 
with careful nursing on our part and much 
patience and suffering on her part, Madika 
made a complete recovery and in a few 
weeks became well and strong. 

Then we again suggested that she and 
Diaga go home. She said, " I cannot leave. 
Let me live close to the hospital. Is there 
not something that I can do?" We im- 
mediately thought of the laundry, which 
is a dirty, unpleasant chore ; washing ulcer 
cloths and bloody operative linen. Her face 
brightened as she said she would learn to 
do that job. Since that time, two years 
ago, any day you could have visited the 
hospital you would have seen Madika pleas- 
antly and patiently washing, boiling, drying, 
sorting and folding the hospital linen. 
Every morning as soon as prayers at the 
hospital are over, this old, wrinkled, black 
African says, " Good morning, son," and I 
say, " Good morning mother." About six 
months ago Madika took her Christian cov- 



enant and a few weeks later the daughter 
Diaga took her covenant. . . . My hum- 
ble opinion is that if I get to Heaven, Madika 
will be one of those to greet me. 

The first successful limb amputation in 
the hospital would make a long story. This 
time we did the begging, because the na- 
tives had never seen an amputation, and 
since they did not think a person could 
survive such an experience, they could not 
imagine an artificial limb. This one was 
the result of a fracture of several years' 
duration which had never healed, but pre- 
sented a foul, gangrenous foot. The man's 
only way of locomotion was sliding around 
on his buttocks. After every other hope 
of cure had gone he consented to amputa- 
tion. Now he is walking on a wooden leg, 
very happy. Since then others have been 
given relief and many years of life for 
similar maimed conditions. 

The thirty-eight confinements by the white 
doctors and nurses have made a tremendous 
difference in the attitude of the natives 
towards the hospital and its strange methods. 
Because not one obstetrical case has been 
lost they see the advantages of medicine 
and sanitary technic. Lately we have been 
called from as far as 15 miles for difficult 
cases. 

The capacity for in-patients in the hos- 
pital is sixty, and most of the rooms are 
full all the time. Morning and evening 
sees a host of out-patients wending their 
way to and from the hospital, for medicine 
or to have their ulcers dressed. Any hour 
of the day or night they come for cuts, 
bruises, scorpion and snake bites. They 
come walking ; they come on donkeys' 
backs ; they come on the back of a relative 
or friend. I have seen a mother carrying 
two children to the hospital, one on her 
shoulder and one on her back ; they come 
on hospital and on native-made stretchers ; 
they come on their hands and knees ; soon 
they will be coming in automobiles, in am- 
bulances and on the train. In 1929 a daily 
average of 114 treatments were given, or a 
total of 41,859. Thus in YOUR hospital at 
Garkida you are making it possible to do 
the very things that Jesus spent a large part 
of his time doing while on earth — healing 
the sick and cleansing the lepers. 



216 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 

1930 



'Three Hopes" In Africa 



SARA C. 

SOME other people are coming? No, I 
don't mind waiting — not any more. In 
America, people are no longer used to 
waiting. In the African bush the abc's of 
happiness are found in the ability to wait 
calmly for things to happen. We have to 
wait for most things excepting for news to 
spread. Newspapers, telephones, and radios 
are not necessary; news just flies. 

What about the African has impressed me 
most? The simple life he lives is perhaps 
the most outstanding impression one gets 
from the African. With nothing or little to 
worry about he is contented and happy. He 
is happy without things and in the presence 
of sufferings and losses. He can smile and 
forget an empty stomach. His happiness is 
contagious because it is real. 

Life in the bush is by no means monoto- 
nous. Just as the bush paths wind and wind 
and give one new scenes and surprises 
around the bend, so it is with a missionary's 
experiences. There is so much to hope for. 

The mother with a baby 
in her arms has everything 
to hope for. She expects 
him to learn to walk, to 
talk, to develop, to do 
things. As she watches 
him develop she has sur- 
prises every day. He may 
disappoint her today but 
she is certain that he will 
give her a glad surprise 
tomorrow. 

Central Africa is yet in 
her early childhood, but 
there is no doubt about her 
capabilities and potentiali- 
ties. They are there. Her 
first steps are giving her 
confidence and ambition to 
go on, and are at the same 
time giving us assurance and hopes for a 
great future. Her tottering steps and dis- 
connected words do not discourage us. They 
are all a part of learning to do things. 

Just off the compound is a settlement of 
Bura Christians. It is known as " The Chris- 
tian village." Our Christians are young both 
in years and experience and they felt the 



SHISLER 

need of an immediate Christian environment 
in order that they might be true to Christian 
ideals and at the same time help each other 
to grow spiritually. 

It is not a village without misunderstand- 
ing, sorrows, and failures. Just recently two 
homes have been broken up. One young 
woman, for whose future we hoped so much, 
left her husband and went to live with a 
pagan man in a pagan village. Another young 
woman died very suddenly. Yet others re- 
main and are making a sincere effort to live 
the Christian life together. 

But I must tell you the most interesting 
thing of all in connection with the Christian 
village. It is " The three hopes" — Samuel, 
Albert, and Paul, chubby baby boys who be- 
long to three of our Christian couples. In 
them lies hope raised to the second degree, 
for they will be second generation Christians. 
If one wants to project an ideal into the fu- 
ture, he needs only to incorporate it into 




THREE CHRISTIAN MOTHERS with their babies, Albert, Samuel and 
Paul. 



the Christian homes and the ideal is safe. 
Only babies now, but the hope of the Church 
of Christ in Africa tomorrow is found in 
them and in others who shall join their 
group. 

Where does our greatest hope lie? In de- 
veloping Christian character, because upon 
it all else depends — the Christian home, the 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



217 



Christian church, the Christian community. 
It is first, last and in between. 

I should like for you to meet some of our 
Christians. I cannot introduce you to all of 
them and I don't like to be partial. 

Probably our youngest baptized Christian 
is a girl, named Kubili. I say " probably the 
youngest " because in the bush a person's 
real birthday is the only one he has. The 
years are not counted. We only guess at 
time that is counted by years. Kubili is a 
capable dignified girl about ten years old. 
She never misses school except when her ab- 
sence is unavoidable. Speaking in American 



terms I should say that she represents a 
" good " family. Two of her brothers are 
baptized Christians. Her mother is an ideal 
Bura housewife. So from every standpoint 
Kubili should become a stronger and more 
useful Christian as the years go by. 

But I haven't yet given you the farthest 
look into the future. As the number of 
Christians and Christian homes multiply and 
their influence spreads, it is inevitable that 
Christian ideals shall gradually supersede 
pagan practices, and we shall have a Chris- 
tian civilization. Time and faithful steward- 
ship shall accomplish that end. 



Industrial Work and Village Uplift 

TOLD BY D. J. LICHTY OF INDIA 



WHAT are the prerequisites for the 
amelioration of the poverty, squalor 
and ignorance of India's humble 
village folk? Well, first of all it requires 
a faith that can move mountains, and an 
optimism born of Christ that their case is 
not hopeless. The contagion of this opti- 
mism must also be spread among the people. 
In the course of centuries they have become 
slaves to fear — fear of famine, fear of dis- 
ease, fear of debt and fear of the gods. 
In their attitude to superiors they have be- 
come servile and among themselves they 
are mutually distrustful and lack faith. 
Worst of all, they have become hardened 
to their condition so that no longer does 
anything very much matter. But let them 
look into the face of One who took upon 
himself the burdens of the poor of all ages 
and hear him say, ' Come unto me and I 
will give you rest,' while he assures them 
that he came to give them life more 
abundantly. This same Christ is in the vil- 
lages of India today. Wherever he goes 
there spring up discontent with things as 
they are and a desire for things as they 
should be. 

" The Christian message comes to the vil- 
lage. In a mysterious way it takes hold of 
the imaginations of a small group of people. 
They begin to seek after the better things 
of life under a new guidance. They send 
their children to school, preferably to a 
Christian school. Here there is opportunity 
of developing not only mental capacity by 
the accumulation of various sorts of knowl- 



edge, but also of forming such traits of 
character as are necessary for a successful 
and useful life. Fortunate is the boy or 
girl who passes up through the village school 
to the larger and better equipped mission 
boarding school. But here lurks a danger 
that is real. If, while seeking and preparing 
for a more ideal mode of life, the student 
comes to despise his own village and re- 
solves to spend his life elsewhere, his in- 
valuable agency for village uplift will be 
lost. Realizing this danger, the leaders of 
religious education have in recent years 
been developing schools on such a basis, that 
the student will from his training be con- 
vinced that the living conditions of his vil- 
lage are not impossible of improvement. 
He will come to believe that his home folks 
will follow his leadership for better things 
if only he has the opportunity of demon- 
strating to them the practical truths of 
Christianity. And why should they not do 
so ? Here is a young man, who if he had 
remained in his old environment would have 
grown up in filth and ignorance, a cigaret 
and liquor fiend, married in boyhood, hope- 
lessly in debt before coming to maturity 
and a dead weight on society the rest of his 
life. But instead, he returns a clean looking 
fellow, his eyes full of hope, with habits of 
dependability and a healthy attitude to- 
wards the dignity of labor. His brain has 
not been developed at the expense of mus- 
cular fibre for he has to do real work on 
the mission farm, in the garden and in the 
shops, in order to help earn his way through 



218 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



. . ... 



«iJSw*|k-~*~~^ 




III ' \i 



THE SCHOOL GIRLS learn to tape their own beds. 




school. A real bond of sympathy is main- 
tained with his people and thus he is not 
disqualified to help them in their problems. 
He comes to them with new ideas of the 
value of time, of industry, of soil culture, 
of fertilizers, of marketing, economics, sani- 
tation, social relationships and of coopera- 
tion on religious and social service. He may 
return to his people in the guise of a 
farmer, teacher, preacher, mechanic or gov- 
ernment servant, but if he is true to his 
training he will be a guide and inspiration 
to them for better things. 

" What is true of boys holds good for 
girls who are educated to like ideals. What 
is more comely and fitting in any village 
than to see a mother giving intelligent at- 
tention to her children and to home duties, 
a woman whose family and house bespeak 
industry, cleanliness, tidiness and regular 
habits, and one that is both able and willing 
to help a neighbor in need? 

" The Christian section of an Indian vil- 
lage was being inspected by an important 
official in company with the head man of a 
high caste village. He found only humble 
huts but clean, with plenty of light and ven- 
tilation and containing an occasional chair, 
desk and some books. Though of lowly 
origin, the women in appearance and bear- 
ing compared well with those of nobler 
birth. The children were clean and well 
behaved. The street was surfaced with 
gravel and the gutters void of rubbish. 
Turning to his companion the official said, 



' We who are more pretentious can learn 
much from these people.' 

"A student from one of our boarding 
schools helped the teacher of his village to 
induce a fine group of people to take on 
the Christ way. These in turn are an in- 
spiration to other villages to do likewise. I 
hope sometime to illustrate how the good 
leaven works from an individual and from 
one village to another. ( For the present, I 
want you to believe that the Christian 
schools of India provide a fulcrum by which 
her villages can be lifted out of their filth 
and squalor and be made so attractive that 
future generations will want to abide in 
them. The leverage to be used on this ful- 
crum reaches to American Here in India 
we are trying to establish the fulcrum on 
solid principles of Christian education and 
as near up to the load as possible. And 
now we say to all willing helpers ' Heave 
away.' " 

COOPERATION IN EDUCATION OF 
MISSIONARY CHILDREN 

(Continued from Page 191) 

the P. T. A. and it has been so successful 
that the association has decided to make it 
an annual affair. 

Woodstock is a growing institution and, 
in order to carry out a more extensive pro- 
gram to meet its needs, solicits the loyal 
support through prayer and financial means 
of the cooperating missions and other 
friends. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



219 



"Having the Will and Finding the Way" 



IDA METZGER 



SATURDAY morning! Home mail day! 
It brought a letter from Dr. Nickey 
in which she said, " The money for 
our new buildings is not in sight. I hope 
you people there are remembering this need 
also, that if it is God's plan for the work, 
the necessary money may be forthcoming." 
Yes, we prayed and God heard. 

The suggestion that he gave us was, " Ask 
the Indians ; let them build the new family 
line. Maybe they will not give much but 
at least what they do give will help and 
maybe it will inspire some in America to 
give more." On this suggestion Miss 
Blickenstaff and I started out. We made 
the appeal to several rich friends who gave 
a little, just a little. Feeling a bit discour- 
aged we thought we might as well go home. 
But we really should not go home without 
seeing our Mohammedan friend, the grain 
merchant ; he isn't rich but we should not 
pass him by. 

He looked at the subscription paper and 
said, " Oh this will not do, you must go at 
it on a bigger scale than this ! You need a 
committee, that is the way we do in India. 
Come along with me." Feeling rather 
foolish we went with him to see his neigh- 
bor, the Parsee merchant. This being a very 
popular loafing place, chairs are always 
available and we were asked to sit down 
in front of the shop. The Mohammedan 
began explaining to a rapidly increasing 
audience that the hospital was needing an 
extension to the family line and the mission 
was asking friends to help. Some of those 
composing the audience came voluntarily. 
others were called off the road. Turning 
to the Parsee, our Mohammedan friend said, 

" Now M , put your name on this paper.'* 

M wrote down rupees twenty-five. " No," 

said our friend, " that is not enough ; you 
should make it more." But the Parsee was 
resolute. The hour was late and Miss 
Blickenstaff and I started home. After 
going only a few yards, we heard some one 
calling, and looking back we saw our friend 
running to overtake us. We stopped to see 
what was the cause of his excitement. He 
said, " M has told me to change his sub- 
scription to fifty-one rupees." Good, we 



thought. We seemed to be getting on the 

way. Even if the subscription was not yet 

very heavy, our spirits were soaring, for 
enthusiasm is contagious. 




Photo by Dr. Ida Metzger. 

GETTING SUBSCRIPTIONS to build the new fam- 
ily line at the Dahanu Hospital. Dr. Metzger and 
Miss Verna Blickenstaff in front of the Parsee mer- 
chant's shop. 

From this point on we were mere figure- 
heads in the raising of the funds. We did 
not ask our friends to undertake the work 
but they did it voluntarily ; all they wanted 
of us was to accompany them as they ap- 
proached those of means. As we went to 
Dahanu we were accompanied by our Mo- 
hammedan friend and a Parsee. We went 
to the home of a fat and self-contented 
timber merchant. Being the noon hour he 
was comfortably lounging in his big front 
room. He was rather scantily clothed, so 
he excused himself to hunt up a shirt. Then, 
in order to make the best use of his time, 
he returned to the parlor to hear what 
was going on while he put on his shirt. 
Then he hunted up a coat and hat. " Now 
before we go you must have tea." The 
men had tea in the parlor and we ladies had 
ours in one of the inner rooms where the 
ladies of the household were gathered. 

Having had our tea, we started to walk 
down the main street of the town. There 
was a committee of missionary folk, a Par- 
see, Mohammedan and Hindu. The first 
call was at the home of an elderly Hindu 
gentlemen, commonly known here as " un- 
cle." He joined the committee, and then 



220 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



another joined our ranks, so that by now 
we numbered seven. Is it any wonder that 
people were very curious to know what it 
was all about and that some followed to 
see where we were going to stop? When 
we stopped they gathered about to see and 
to hear. 
Uncle led us to the home of one of his 

relatives, H The need was explained to 

H and he said, " Yes, I should like to 

build a block of rooms in memory of my 
grandfather but I cannot give as much as 
you require." After a little he said, " I 
will build half, that is, a block of three 
rooms and some one else can build another 
similar block." Good, half the project set- 
tled ! The Indians were triumphant and we 
were startled almost out of our wits. 



However there was one difficulty. He 
said he would give only a certain amount 
and this was less than the estimate made 
by the mission. I brought up this question 
to our Indian friends. Did this daunt them? 
Never! Two of them said, "We will take 
the contract for that amount and whatever 
falls short we will put into it." The mission 
accepted the gift, plans were made and very 
soon the building was started. 

But not every one was friendly to the 
project. Many unkind things were said 

about H and his gift. After some days 

a man stopped at the dispensary with some 
handbills which he was distributing about 
the community. They were entitled, " Da- 
hanu Mission Hospital and some misunder- 

(Continued on Page 266) 



Pastoral Calls in China 

ERNEST M. WAMPLER 



ARE we here already? How quickly 
you pastors here in America can 
make your calls ! We in China are 
not able to make many miles a day traveling 
on donkeys, but by staying at it all day 
and part of the night we are able to go 
quite a distance in a week. Do you remem- 
ber the story of our old readers, of the hare 
and the tortoise which ran a race? We 
live by the tortoise philosophy in China 
when it comes to traveling. 

O, would you like to know about our 
visits to our church members in China? I 
am glad you asked me to tell you about 
them. Our camp cots, bedding, clothing and 
a box of food have to be tied on the little 
donkeys. The driver uses quite a bit of time 
lifting the articles to go and finally divides 
it among them. One with a light load is 
reserved for riding when we get tired. We 
always want to get started early but here 
it is eight o'clock and we are not on the 
road yet. At last all the things are tied on 
to the saddle and the burden ready to be 
lifted onto the donkeys. We wind in and 
out the valleys, making about three miles an 
hour. How slowly we go, but the time 
passes rather rapidly. A man walking has 
overtaken us and we walk along together. 
Being a stranger he asks all kinds of ques- 
tions about America, whether it is cold, how 
the farmers cultivate their fields, what kind 



of crops they raise, and whether we use 
donkeys to travel, also if we are teaching 
Christianity. Often we meet some of our 
church members or inquirers and as we 
walk with them we talk of their Christian 
experience, of some of the joys of the Chris- 
tian life, and whether they are persecuted. 
Here we are at the inn where we stop 
for dinner. The time has passed so quickly 
this morning, but my watch says it is two 
o'clock and we are only twelve miles from 
Liao. The children come running and soon 
a large number are at the inn. As we eat 
our lunch we talk to them. Here are sev- 
eral bright-looking boys with small books 
in their hands. They are schoolboys. But 
the girls have no school to go to ; they stay 
at home and learn to do house duties in 
order to be efficient brides. After about one 
and a half hours in the inn the donkey 
driver is ready to go. We urge our donkeys 
along for they will have to go faster if we 
make our destination by night. Urging 
does not do much good. Night comes, but 
we have a lantern so we light it and travel 
on, seven and eight o'clock, but still we 
have about eight miles to go. Here is 
another small village inn and we inquire if 
they can give us lodging for the night. They 
have one or two places but that is not 
enough. On looking around a little we find 
a shed which was used for a stable, but now 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



221 



no animals are in it so we ask to put up 
our camp cots. The inn-keeper is willing. 
This being a bargain we get ready for our 
night's rest. At dawn we are awakened by 
the braying of the donkeys in the other 
stable. 

After three hours' travel w r e arrive at the 
place where we had hoped to stay all night. 
Here we have five church members. We 
make a short call at each of their homes, 
several of them going along as we go from 
home to home. In this home the father has 
been a church member for about ten years, 
but poor fellow, he has not made much 
progress in his Christian life. He seems 
to be content just to be a church member 
and reap the benefit of the good name of 
the church. O, yes, the church has a good 
name in China. People soon learn that a 
church member is expected to be a good 
person. 

Here we are at another member's home. 
Some children have run on ahead and told 
of our coming and the husband has come 
out to meet us. How glad he is and what 
a hearty welcome we receive as we enter 
his home. Water is put on the fire so they 
can serve tea. On the walls there are a 
number of Christian pictures and the idol 
gods have been taken down. As we talk 
about the church work he is much inter- 
ested ; he is eager to see it go forward but 
does not know much about how he can help. 
His previous religious experience does not 



help him in knowing how to propagate his 
new faith. This has to be taught to him 
along with the principles of Christianity. 

Several more hours on the road takes us 
to another village and the home of the 
Chinese evangelist of this territory. We 
will eat our dinner here. O, yes, we can eat 
with chopsticks all right, anyone can soon 
learn that. But how nice this home is here 
— everything clean and in order, nothing 
elaborate but it shows a distinct Christian 
atmosphere. Here the wife is also a church 
member and wields an influence for good 
among the women of the village. The evan- 
gelist will now go with us to some of the 
members' homes. The home we visit first 
is that of a young man, a Christian, w r ho 
has just been married. All of his close rel- 
atives are dead and the new bride has the 
freedom which most new brides do not have. 
She also has learned of the west and of the 
freedom of women and wants to enjoy these 
privileges. The husband is very uneasy, 
afraid she will run away with another man 
and he has paid two hundred dollars for 
her. As we talked of this, one Chinese said, 
" Freedom for wives is all right if it has a 
Christian ' flavor,' but freedom apart from 
Christianity is not good under Chinese cus- 
toms." That is just it, you must take all 
of the teachings of Christ if you want to 
enjoy the abundant life which he came to 
give. 




ERNEST WAMPLER READY TO START ON PASTORAL CALLING. 



222 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



A Chat About Bura Home Life 

LUCILE G. HECKMAN 



M 



AY I come to the kitchen and talk 
while you work? I am quite ac- 
customed to that sort of thing be- 
cause we make some of our best contacts 
while visiting with women as they are at 
their work about their compounds, occa- 
sionally helping a bit if they are doing some- 
thing we can do. 

" No, I wouldn't call their compounds 




SHELLAM TARFA, WITH HIS WIFE AND 
CHILDREN. He is one of the most mature Chris- 
tians and has a steadying influence on the younger 
Christians, many times giving them wise cousel. 
He was recognized as a "good Bura" before he be- 
came a "good Christian." 

(Below) MRS. HECKMAN WITH A BURA BABY 
ON EITHER KNEE. Albert, who was born on 
Brother Helser's birthday, was quite happy until 
Samuel was placed on the other knee. Then he 
voiced his disapproval. Both of these babies were 
born to Christian parents. 



' homes,' because so few of them really are. 
How can they be, when there are two or 
three or four wives in the compound with 
the attendant jealousy and quarreling. Then 
too, even blood ties are very loose. It is 
almost impossible to find out a child's real 
relations. Any woman who feeds a child 
is spoken of as its mother. The man in 
whose house it lives is known as master. 

" But we see a real contrast to this dark 
picture in some of our Christian homes. 
The compound is cleaner ; the clothes are 
comparatively clean; and the baby is bathed 
rather than smeared with a filthy mixture 
of oil and red clay. There are usually books 
about, and very often some one is reading 
aloud. The home life of our Christians is 
not yet what we would consider ideal, but 
they have come up a long way from the 
ordinary pagan home and we rejoice over 
the progress made. 

" Yes, indeed ! Bura girls learn just as 
quickly in school as do the boys. It is a 
problem, though, to keep them coming reg- 
ularly over a long period of time. It isn't 
much wonder, when they get only discour- 
agement at home. During the planting 
season, and again at harvest time, it is really 
difficult for them to come. Everyone who 
is big enough to swing a hoe is expected 
to work on the farm. Or if not that, they 
must tend the sheep and goats, or care for 
the younger children. And then when the 
harvest season is over and one builds up 
hopes of a good school attendance, he is 
distracted by a whirl of social events — games 
and dancing in the moonlight, farm clear- 
ings, weddings, hunting field mice when the 
bush burns, and fishing. And I have more 
than a suspicion that these are more potent 
to keep the girls out of school than the 
farmwork. A thoroughly human viewpoint, 
isn't it ? 

" Before I leave I want to have a look 
at the reading texts your children are using 
in school. One of the biggest tasks we 
have in a new field like ours in Africa is 
to provide really suitable textbooks for 
teaching reading. It is one problem to 
teach, and quite another to write one's own 
textbooks, 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



223 



" Yes, I think we have clone remarkably 
well in the literature line, when you con- 
sider that our missionaries' first task was 
to learn an unwritten language. Less than 
ten years ago not a sound of the Bura lan- 
guage had been written. We now have in 
print two primers, a reader, a book of Old 
Testament stories, the Life of Christ, the 
Gospel of Mark, the Book of Acts, a cate- 
chism, and a song book which also contains 
miscellaneous bits of scripture. The Gospel 
of John and a book of Bura folk-lore will 
soon be ready for the press. 

"Are the Bura people lazy? I was sure 
you would ask that question. It seems quite 
natural that people with black skins, who 
live down under the tropical sun, should be 
lazy, doesn't it? Even we missionaries have 
a tendency to get lazy sometimes. With 
the Bura, it depends largely on his task- 
master. If he is working for the white man 
he can be most exasperatingly lazy. But 
when he has work to do for himself, es- 
pecially farm work, he makes the hours 
count. 

" The African may be very easily spoiled. 
Given half a chance he can readily assume 
an attitude of superiority to manual labor. 
We, as a mission, are determined to avoid 
that if possible. We believe in the gospel 
of training the hand, as well as the heart 



and mind. Some industrial education has 
already been launched, and plans are being 
made for much more. 

" In the girls' school we hope to teach 
the arts practised by the Bura women. They 
include gourd decorating, granary making, 
the making of water-pots and cooking pots. 
Also we want to teach them ways and 
means of insuring better health, through 
sanitation and the use of more vegetables. 
In short, our desire is to develop better 
Bura wives and mothers. 

" How I wish I might just take you with 
me to Buraland next Sunday. I believe it 
would be an inspiration to you, as it is to 
me, to see the happy Christian faces gath- 
ering in the village church for the morning 
service. Following the service many of 
them will go to near-by villages to share 
their Christ with others who do not yet 
know him. None of them are old in spiritual 
experience, but they are eager to pass on 
that which they hold dear. I think it is 
your missionary spirit in sending us to them 
that makes them see their responsibility for 
spreading the gospel. 

" Thank you for asking so many ques- 
tions. That makes it easy to tell people 
what they really wish to know about our 
work." 



An Evening With F. C. Rohrer in North Carolina 



Another day of school over. Have you 
had to wait long? One of our schoolboys, 
who was graduated last year from our high 
school, is trying to get settled into some 
worth-while work 
and wanted to talk 
a while. I can hard- 
ly turn a boy away 
when he comes to 
me for such help. 
Mrs. Rohrer says 
they will be calling 
me "Dad" at school 
and "Professor" at 
home, because I 
am gone so much. 
But she is as inter- 
ested in the work 
as can be and helps 
all she can outside of the care of our four 




F. C. ROHRER 



children, who are from one to six years old. 
I have to be away at night sometimes, and 
at other times after supper, so it is lonely 
here for her. 

From Monday until Friday I am busy with 
class room duties. Then on Saturday I get 
into the Ford and drive to my appointments, 
forgetting school and family (sometimes) 
until I return late Sunday evening. Some of 
the churches are located off the main 
road, making it necessary to abandon the 
Ford and walk or sometimes make it on 
horseback. But I can assure you that a 
week-end spent in some of these secluded 
mountain churches gives one the greatest 
Christian experience. I believe that the Mas- 
ter must have been greatly refreshed in body 
and soul by his departure into the mountains 
of Galilee, whose scenic beauty can not be 

(Continued on Page 234) 



224 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



The Joys of P 



loneenng 

H. S. KULP 



HOW dy' do ! I was so glad for the 
invitation to visit you. Especially 
so since you said you wanted to 
ask me about pioneering in Africa. 

In the early days, now more than seven 
years ago, we had to " rough it " a bit. 
While we were traveling about seeking a 
suitable location and while we were build- 
ing our first houses, the hotels in which we 
put up were somewhat primitive. All our 
baggage was carried on the heads of men. 
Each man carried sixty pounds or more. 
A man thus loaded makes about fifteen miles 



village headman to whom a small fee is 
paid. Certain food supplies are brought for 
sale. These are supplemented from the 
travelers' supply of tinned goods. Cooking 
and sleeping outfits are carried along. 
Water in the dry season, especially in poorly 
watered areas, is the color of the clay which 
it holds in saturated solution. We disguise 
it in tea or some other drink. When we 
drink it we try to forget what it looked 
like before it became an ingredient of our 
drink. White clothes washed in the same 




Photo by Paul Rupel. 

A VILLAGE SERVICE. Here is Bro. Kulp at Lassa preaching to a group of Margis. They 
assemble under a big tree when the bell rings through the village. The work at Lassa is still 
in its infancy, but already a substantial start has been made. 



a day. Resthouses have been built at con- 
venient intervals along the main roads. 
These resthouses are mud huts with grass 
roofs. Most of them are circular, about 
20 ft. in diameter. They have been erected 
for Europeans only. (That also includes 
Americans.) But as European travelers are 
few, donkeys, sheep, and goats use these 
for shelter during the day. Native travelers 
are not averse to using them at night. The 
dust of ages collects, also the vermin of 
men and beasts. There is a variety of 
pungent but indefinable aromas. On alight- 
ing one sweeps and ventilates this hotel. 
Wood and water are furnished by the local 



fluid soon become dyed a fashionable 
" Sports Cream." 

As for vermin, if one lays out the bed 
clothes in the hot midday sun, there is 
temporary relief. Everybody has them. 
You know the shortest poem in existence. 
Here it is : 

" Adam 
Had 'em." 
Two young men were arguing as to whether 
the white people were infested with these 
pests. One of them insisted that we surely 
must be for no one was exempt. He knew 
certain important chiefs and he knew they 
(Continued on Page 266) 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



225 



The Sheer Joy of Service 



A. S. B. MILLER 



YES, I'll admit that this is the common 
accusation, that Christians in India are 
' Rice Christians,' those who have 
come for the loaves and fishes. But sit 
down now and let us talk about it. I am 
frank to admit that annual reports and 




Photo by Harlan Brooks. 

OUR CHRISTIAN SADU. He farms to pay ex- 
penses, but he takes his little "banjo" and sings the 
songs of Jesus' life. He visits many villages and 
other mission stations and always gives his testimony. 



general reports have very little to say about 
1 Volunteer Service ' among Indian Chris- 
tians, so you might naturally think that 
the only folks who actually do anything for 
the Lord are those who receive compensa- 
tion for their work. 

" Perhaps you did not read the December 
number of The Missionary Visitor which 
tells of the ' Laymen's Movement ' at Ahwa. 
These folks live out in the Dangs country, 
are poor economically, living on a. hand-to- 



mouth existence and often they do not have 
enough in the hand to reach the mouth; 
but they have a desire to serve the Lord. 
Realizing that they should serve their Lord 
and do something for him they decided to 
farm a field for him. They took their oxen, 
their plows, and themselves to that field 
one day and cultivated a field of rice, the 
proceeds of which they turned into the 
Lord's treasury. Again these same folks 
were instructed that in Bible times the first 
fruits were always dedicated to the Lord. 
As a result the boarding school boys brought 
their first garden products to give for the 
Lord's work. The first Sunday set apart 
for ' First Fruits ' Sunday was in November 
1926. Since then it has been observed each 
year, at which time the folks have brought 
of whatever products they had such as grain, 
chickens and in one case a calf. Besides 
this there was a cash offering, which on 
the last occasion amounted to forty rupees 
and three annas (about $14.50). A plan such 
as this is a beginning towards self-support, 
and considering the poverty of these folks 
this is a most noble offering. 

"And what shall we say about those lay- 
men, carpenters, contractors, masons, farm- 
ers and laborers of the Bulsar area who 
have taken such an active part in help- 
ing to look after the work in the dis- 
trict, giving of their own time without 
financial compensation or going to the 
library in the town to meet non-Christians 
with whom they talk about the Christ and 
witness for him? Nor should we forget 
about those volunteer workers who con- 
ducted four Sunday-schools regularly in 
near-by villages and hamlets, going each 
week for this purpose. A dozen or more 
young men were faithful in helping serve in 
a Sunday-school near Bulsar, going there 
every Sunday during a period of six years. 

" He was only a teacher in a village school, 
located in an out-of-the-way village far 
from the beaten tracks. Mission teachers 
in these schools are apt to feel that they 
have done their full duty if they teach the 
children who choose to come to them. Not 
so with Chavan master. He had an eye to 
see many opportunities to serve. His heart 



226 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



went out in pity to the poor and the sick. 
The mission dispensary was at Vada six 
miles away and the road was muddy. There 
were rivers and streams to wade and he 
always had a load of bazaar supplies to 
carry home for his own family. The large 
bottle of quinine mixture, some liniment, and 
other medicines did not add much to his 
load because he was thinking of the suffer- 
ing ones who needed these remedies. Sores 
and injuries he often bound up with his 
own hands and helped care for the sick in 
their homes. Does such volunteer service 
count much for the cause of Christ? Ask 
the people of Monj. When disciples of 
Christ bear testimony in such loving deeds, 
it is not hard for the people to understand 
that ' God is love.' 

" Nor would we forget about the students 
of the Anklesvar Vocational School who 
each Sunday evening walk from three to 
ten miles to conduct meetings for the pur- 
pose of spreading the gospel, and the girls 
of our boarding schools, who at every op- 
portunity go to villages to sing or give the 
gospel story through dramas. On one such 
occasion one non-Christian spoke thus: "Our 
girls cannot measure up to this. When they 
sing the words are meaningless, vulgar, with 
immoral teachings. Look at the neatness 
and cleanliness of these Christian girls' ap- 
parel and appearance ! Surely it is good to 
have them go to school to learn ways of 
improvement and modesty." Another said : 



" My daughter shall go to school this very 
year. Compared with these girls my daugh- 
ter seems an ox, for she knows nothing." 

" The list becomes long but we must men- 
tion Dhanjibhai, that saint who lives in 
Taropa village of Raj Pipla State, who re- 
fused to tap his Palm trees for the tadi 
(liquor), thereby losing five hundred dollars 
annually. 

" Nor can we forget the brother in Raj 
Pipla State who won his neighbor to Christ 
and now this newly changed man and his 
entire house has joined the forces of the 
Lord. 

"Nor can statistical figures tell of the 
spirit behind that great army of volunteers 
who each year throughout our mission area 
move in small groups from village to village, 
from farm, school and hamlet, to spread 
the good news among those who have not 
yet learned to know the Lord. Or those 
who work in their fields all day and assist 
the evangelists and missionaries during the 
touring season each year. Nor can we 
enumerate the untold evidences of personal 
testimony which has never come to our 
attention but has been a potent factor in 
the work of the kingdom in India, all done 
quietly and reverently, unrecorded in earth- 
ly books but written in the hearts of those 
whom God yearns to have as his own. And 
this testimony is the seed which some day 
shall bear fruit." 



The Joy of Missionary Service 



NETTIE M. SENGER 



YOU'RE glad I've come? Well, I want- 
ed to come to tell you about the great- 
est joy of my life. If I would ask 
you to guess what I mean to talk about you 
would all guess right for it's just the one 
thing the Master did while here, and the 
one thing he wants us to do — build char- 
acter, build Godlike character, and build 
it in ourselves and others as Jesus did. 
Since this vision of building character came 
to me I have not had an unhappy moment. 
There is always opportunity to see and ex- 
perience something new. One keeps so busy 
interpreting all the events of life in terms of 
character building, that it puts a halo about 
everything that happens. It's such fun beat- 



ing Satan back and coming out ahead, be- 
cause he likes to make some events of life 
look ugly and tries to make us think they 
are a misfit, or that the things happening to 
us are unfair and hinder our character build- 
ing, or that the vision of a Godlike char- 
acter after all isn't real and cannot be ob- 
tained. It never becomes monotonous prov- 
ing to him that he is wrong and that we can 
live in harmony with God, and that things 
which seem unharmonious are only our near- 
sightedness or looking through colored 
glasses. Everything becomes a stepping 
stone to assist us to mount the ladder as 
we walk in the new Christlike life. 
When we learn that this is the great mean- 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



227 




TRAVELING EVANGELISTS. Miss Senger and 
Miss Ulrey on the road when the thermometer reg- 
istered twenty below. (Below) BIBLE STUDY 
CLASS at Chin Chou winter of 1929. 

ing of life and can walk therein we can be- 
gin to point others the same way and help 
them lay the stepping stones for mounting. 
I have been a long time digging this treasure 
out of the field but now I have it and am 
showing others where and how to dig so 
they can get it too. Since I have this treas- 
ure, the vision of a Godlike life and how 
to get it, I go about in the villages of Shansi 
to show others the vision and help them start 
digging because the treasure can be found 
in their field as well as in mine. I help them 
polish, carve, and refine the treasure, and 
we all rejoice in what has been found. Jesus 
guides us else we would not know how. 

But isn't village work hard, you ask? 
Not with this point of view. You get so 
interested getting everybody to seek for 
their treasures and help them arrange them 
for use, that although you drop to sleep 
going, you don't feel tired. There is always 
something ahead that you are so interested 
in that you cannot stop. Even though 
thorns and briars prick, and the sun pours 
down hot, or it rains, we don't seem to 
heed because we are finding the one thing 
that we want. Folks, there's nothing quite 



so satisfying as village work with this aim. 
IT'S JUST REAL SPORT. Our lives grow 
together as we work and it becomes a great 
hiking trip with Jesus as guide in a search 
for character. 

When I see forward steps made, although 
ever so small, in the village life I know they 
are seeking and finding and putting stone 
upon stone in the great eternal building 
which is being made out of human materials 
guided by the skilled hand of the great Mas- 
ter Builder, and I help do the arranging. 

When you think of me traveling in vil- 
lages, don't think of me as sacrificing, but 
rather think of me as on a great expedition 
seeking for character, and happy all the 
time because I keep finding it. Some time 
again I will tell you some of the details in 
this expedition, and how some of my friends 
are finding their treasure, and how they lay 
their experience in order as stepping stones 
to make a great secure ladder to Jesus, and 
how Jesus the unseen Leader has directed it 
all. je & 

THE NEXT FIVE YEARS 

(Continued from Page 200) 
in this new program as loyally as they have 
in the program of the past. 

We begin this period with the mission op- 
erating three hospitals and three primary 
schools. We have four partly organized 
churches, with one ordained Chinese minis- 
ter, who is an elder, and a few deacons. 
With a scattered membership of one thous- 
and people, you can readily see what our 
task is for the next five years. The mission- 
aries, along with the Chinese evangelists and 
teachers, are planning to cooperate with the 
five year program in China, which has a 
twofold objective. The first is the cultiva- 
tion of the spiritual life of the Christians by 
giving them a deeper knowledge of Christ, 
a more intimate fellowship with him, and a 
more courageous following of him; second, 
because of the fruits of the first, to double 
the Chinese church membership by the end 
of the five year period. Our mission hopes 
to have several fully organized churches and 
a substantial native ministry by the end of 
the year 1935. This will require an inten- 
sive program of religious education. Much 
simple Christian literature will also be need- 
ed. The mission will likely appoint some of 
its best leaders to push this double task. 



228 



The Missionary Visitor 

Italian Church of the Brethren 

REV. PROF. G. ALLEGRI 



June 
1930 



Our mission is situated right in the heart 
of a large colony in South Brooklyn, and by 
every available means we are seeking to 
bring these people in touch with the Gospel 
and show them the way of salvation. Our 
aim is to hold up Christ. 

To understand the value of a mission one 
must first get acquainted with temperaments, 
customs and religious practices of the people 
among whom the work is carried on. The 
Chinese, Indian and African soul must be 
studied; errors and prejudices which beset 
their minds must be known; worldly inter- 
ests, in conflict with the acceptance of the 
Gospel, must be reckoned with in order to 
be in a position to value correctly the hard 
task entrusted to a missionary who is en- 
deavoring to lead souls into the kingdom of 
God. This is also true of our Italian people. 
I know many of our American Protestants 
are inclined to consider Italy a Christian na- 
tion, the Roman Catholic Church as one of 
the various denominations, with some pecul- 
iar practices, if you like, but Christian, any- 
way. 

It would be very easy, if there were enough 
space, to show that while the Church of 
Rome, to which nominally most of the 
Italians belong, 

holds the ar- 
ticles of the 

apostles' creed 

as a profession 

of faith, in 

practice lays 

aside all of 

these doctrines 

and s t i c k s to 

ceremonies and 

practices that 

have been cop- 
ied from old 

paganism. 

The visible 
head of Ro- 
manism is being called Pontifex Maximus, a 
title belonging to the supreme authority of 
the old Roman paganism. Purgatory can be 
found in the sixth book, or canto, of Virgil's 
^Eneid. Rosary, the praying tool, was copied 
from Buddhism and other heathen religions. 




Rev. Prof. G. Allegri 



Wafer and doctrine of transubstantiation 
have their origin in the mola, a little tool of 
the ancient Roman religion, ridiculed by 
Tullius Cicero in his book, "De Natura 
Deorum." Idols carried around in procession 
and worshiped and prayed to, so sternly con- 
demned by all the scriptures, is a pagan in- 
heritance of the religion of the Italians. 
Saints, males and females, chosen patrons, or 
protectors over cities, trades and professions, 
are all heathen stuff. Most of the church 
festivals are pagan in their origin, renamed 
with Christian names. 

Christian truths accepted only in name, 
and pagan practices followed in practical life, 
is the real condition of the people among 
whom we are called to minister and work. 
The Italians need to be enlightened in the 
Gospel as much as the Asiatic people. 

Obstacles are many, as it may well be un- 
derstood, among a people who are steeped in 
idolatry, superstitions, soothsayers and even 
witchcraft to a certain extent. 

Just one incident to show how even those 
who desire the truth are hindered because of 
superstitions and prejudices. A young man 
was given the word of God to read. After 
reading it he liked it and became so hungry 
and thirsty for the truth that he attended 
some of our meetings in order that he might 
be better enlightened. On noticing that he 
stopped coming, we hastened to ascertain the 
reason whereof. We found that each Sunday 
and Wednesday evening when he would 
have gladly joined us, his wife and mother- 
in-law practically held him a prisoner. This 
wasn't enough. They forced him to go to 
the priest to recant, and to be persuaded by 
him to destroy his Bible. He went with 
them, not because he meant to do as they 
wished, but because, even in the presence of 
the priest, he wished to show them how 
prejudiced they were. The priest was com- 
pelled to acknowledge that the Bible which 
this young man had was good, that it was the 
true Bible, and not falsified by the Protes- 
tants. But with all that they have succeeded 
in keeping him from coming to church. His 
wife threatened to kill their own baby and 
commit suicide if he left the Roman Catholic 
Church to become a Protestant. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



229 



China Women s Mission Industry 



MINNIE F. BRIGHT 



A NUMBER of years ago there was a 
small group of women attending the 
women's school. They were women 
who were poor in this world's goods but 
with a genuine purpose to learn to read and 
know more of the gospel story. Being poor, 
it was not so easy to leave home every day 
and spend time learning to read for they 
were needed in the home. The warm- 
hearted missionary, who had charge of the 
school, conceived the idea of giving them a 
little work to do by which they might earn 
a little money to help support themselves 
and thus redeem some of the time spent 
away from home. There were no funds to 
draw from for such a work, so the mis- 
sionary took from her own slender support 
to buy a little cloth from which they made 
small articles which were sent home to 
friends to sell. The small returns were 
reinvested and thus the half dozen women 
were supplied with a little work. 

It was not until the famine time of nine 
years ago that the work was entered into 
with any proportions. At this time the Red 
Cross gave $500 (Mex.) toward famine 
women and children at Ping Ting. Some of 
the missionary women considered it wise to 
use this money to pay the women for work 
they might do rather than give it out to 
them as a gift in food. Some of us had 
gifts sent to us to use in the famine relief, 
so with some of these gifts we bought ma- 
terials and gave work to some forty famine 
women. Out of the $500 we paid them for 
their work. With this they could buy food 
at a very low rate. Some of these women 
we found to be very worthy and of course 
some were not. After four or five months, 
when a new crop was being gathered, the 
famine relief closed down the work. All 
the people went to their homes except some 
of these women. Some were left widows 
during this time, others had nothing to go 
back to. We were left with a small group 
of them. Many others, even though they 
had gone home, were still very poor and 
their condition little improved. Some of 
these continued to need help. The work 
they had done during those famine weeks 
had been sent to the homeland to friends 



to sell. The returns were good, for money 
exchanged at a good rate. This provided 
us with a small working capital and we could 




MRS. CHIN AND HER LITTLE GRANDDAUGH- 
TER. The beautiful designs on the industrial work 
are cut by her free hand. Tell her the design you 
want and she will sit down and cut it out. Mrs. 
Chin is also a teacher in the Bible School, where the 
women learn to read the Bible and other useful 
books, as well as earn their living by sewing. 



continue helping a group of women without 
any personal expense. 

During the years since, the work has 
gradually grown. A large group of women 
has been helped during this time, and the 
blessing it has been to them will not be 
entirely known in this world. Materials, 
designs, and workmanship have been grad- 
ually improved until the work sells itself 
wherever it goes. The work requires mar- 
velous patience, skill with the needle and 
no little artistic ability ; yet with all this the 
women are never happier than when they 
have plenty of work to do. One of the 
Chinese women does all the designing and 
it is truly a marvel to see her cut the designs 



230 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



with her crude scissors without tracing a 
design. 

Every woman upon receiving work is 
urged to learn to read, and there are teach- 
ers provided for this purpose. She is taught 
how to be a better mother, a better home- 
maker, how to prevent contagion, and above 
all she is taught of the Savior who loves 
her. Many of these women can now read 
the gospel story. The work becomes a 
means to a great end and a. number of them 
have become Christians. When they are ill, 
or their children, they are given free medical 
care, and were it not for this help a number 
would have succumbed to illness long before 
this. 

From some of the profits accruing from 
the work we have been able to endow three 
beds in three different hospitals during the 
past year. Here, poor women, who cannot 
afford to pay hospital expense, may go and 
have free treatment. Also, the work is help- 
ing to support a young man in the seminary 
who is preparing for the ministry. The past 
year it has supported all the women's work 



at Ping Ting besides giving for famine relief 
and other gifts. For the coming year it is 
our hope that we can assume the support 
of all the women's work at Ping Ting, Shou 
Yang, and Tai Yuan Fu stations. Besides 
the women themselves receiving direct bene- 
fit, we are able to carry the love and light 
of Christ to many villages far and near. It 
is the only self-supporting work of the mis- 
sion. There have been, and are still, warm- 
hearted friends at home who have assisted 
in a most noble way in selling the work. 
Were it not for their cooperation the work 
could never have attained the success it has. 
The Master surely will reward them richly 
for ministering to these needy ones, hungry 
in soul and body. God has been graciously 
kind in remembering these dear mothers 
and children, making it possible for them 
to earn an honorable living and thus to 
learn of him. " For ye have the poor al- 
ways with you, and whensoever ye will ye 
can do them good," fell from the lips of 
One who cared. 



Building a Church in a Great Industrial City 



MERLIN C. SHULL 



IN April, 1916, twelve 
members of the 
Church of the Breth- 
ren, eight from one family, 
began religious services in 
the Central Y. M. C. A. 
About two months later, or 
June 10, the first meeting 
was held in a store front 
at 1249 Mack Ave. 

The work grew so rap- 
idly that in one year the 
store was inadequate so a 
little frame church at 3523 
Cadillac Ave. was pur- 
chased by the District 
Mission Board of Michi- 
gan for $3,500.00. The 
building was reconditioned 
by the resident members 
at a total cost of $8,000.00. 
This building was dedicat- 
ed in June, 1917. On Feb- 
ruary 2, 1918, a committee representing the 
District Conference of Michigan organized 




THE DETROIT CHURCH 

the church. Rev. J. F. Dietz served as the 
first pastor of the congregation. Forty-one 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



231 




CHINESE SUNDAY-SCHCOL of the Detroit church. 



persons were enrolled as charter members. 

From Sept. 1, 1922, to Nov. 1, 1928. Rev. 
and Mrs. A. O. Mote served as full time 
pastors of the church. The work grew 
rapidly under their leadership. The little 
church on Cadillac was soon outgrown, so 
on Sept. 19, 1926, the present church home 
was dedicated. This splendid building was 
purchased at a very reasonable figure. We 
are greatly indebted to the General Mission 
Board for a substantial loan to make this 
possible. The Ladies' Aid of our church 
has assumed the full responsibility of paying 
the installments on this loan so it is not a 
burden to the church. The church now 
has a yearly budget of $12,000.00, a large 
part of which goes toward paying for our 
fine building. At the time of moving into 
the building there were 217 members, now 
there are over 385. A city like this loses 
many members, so there has been a gross 
gain of 166. The Sunday-school attendance 
has more than doubled. I know of no 
church more respected by the community 
in which it is located than this one ; many 
are the expressions of appreciation. The 
church has some contact with about 150 
families in the community. It has been a 
wonderful investment of time, prayers and 
money. Our thanks shall always be to the 
General Mission Board and all others who 
made possible this wise step. 

Detroit is a great industrial center, the 



automobile capital of the world. Many 
Brethren people come here. Your son or 
daughter may be the next to come. These 
good people come from all over the brother- 
hood. It is therefore very fitting for the 
General Mission Board to make a. loan to 
a church like this. A poorly equipped or 
shabby looking building would not be ac- 
ceptable to the kind of Brethren people 
coming to Detroit, nor would it attract the 
people of this community. 

Though we are located in a strictly Eng- 
lish-speaking community, the foreigner is 
not forgotten. Almost from the beginning 
of the work a Chinese Sunday-school has 
been held each Sunday afternoon. Mr. M. 
B. Williams has been the very faithful su- 
perintendent of this school. Rev. Moy Way 
has been a great inspiration to it. Twenty- 
three men have been baptized. These boys 
have made liberal offerings both to home 
and foreign work. This spring has ex- 
perienced a revival of interest in the Chi- 
nese Sunday-school. The Detroit Board of 
Education is furnishing free to us a highly 
trained teacher of English. She spends one 
hour each week with the boys, teaching 
English. Our own faithful teachers conduct 
the worship services and Bible classes. The 
attendance of Chinese men is now averaging 
around twenty-five. There were seventy- 
four present for a special Christmas pro- 
gram. 



232 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



They Need Nice Things Too 



EFFIE V. LONG 



JUST a half hour to talk, and you want 
to hear about my most recent experi- 
ences and work in India? Well now, 
what I am going to tell you may not be 
so interesting- to you but it is to me. 

Just think of one million children of 
school age without a little weekly or month- 
ly paper to read, and without any nice story 
books to choose from ! None at all ! And 
they are children who go to school ten and 
a half months of the year, and many of 
them pass their grades from year to year! 

What do they read? Why, their school 
books, and they are very prosy sometimes. 
Then in the Christian homes they have the 
Bible and the hymn book, which comprise 
the family library in many homes. 

Missionaries and Christian teachers were 
so busy getting schools started, and gath- 
ering the children in, and helping and teach- 
ing older folks, that they did not find time 
nor had they the money to get out a monthly 
magazine and prepare nice, clean story-books 
with attractive pictures for children. The 
non-Christians got ahead, to our shame, and 
began a children's magazine, and here we 
had been hoping and praying for the money 
to begin one for years ! The way opened, 
after different committees and societies ap- 
proved of the plan, and oh, how exciting 
to think we were really going to have a 
Christian monthly for all the children of 
Gujarat ! Of course it must have pictures, 
and pretty ones, and we must print them 
in different colors and use good type and 
paper to make it attractive ! The children 
must love it! And they did, right from 
the start ! 

How the children eagerly look forward 
to its coming each month and if it is a day 
or two late they send a card to ask the 
editor why! The little outcaste boy, going 
to his " outcaste " work, comes by with a 
smiling face, proud that he has the paper 
and proud that he can read it. That sub- 
scription was a gift to him by some thought- 
ful missionary. 

It is a pleasure to see how the children 
respond when a story-writing contest is 
launched, for the best of which prizes are 
given and the stories printed in the paper. 



And how they work on the puzzles and 
enigmas to answer all and have their names 
appear in print ! India children are not 




CHILDREN'S GARDEN OR BALVADI. 

cover for the children's magazine. 



Front 



different from folks the world over, are 
they? 

In the stories and puzzles as well as in 
getting new names of subscribers, not only 
the Christian children but the Hindu, Mos- 
lem, and Parsee children as well, take an 
active part. They read the little magazine 
from cover to cover and of course get the 
Bible story too. When they work to win 
a prize it may be a hymn book or a New 
Testament or some Christian book. 

We named the little magazine " Children's 
Garden," and a very delightful place it is 
for the children to roam in, at will. 

" Children's Garden " or " Balvadi " as they 
call it, is now two years old. During the 
first eighteen months we went up to 600 
subscriptions. Several copies come to U. S. 
A., several go to Africa and one to Ran- 
goon. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



233 



Some children borrow it from their neigh- 
bors to read, some schools take it for the 
children, but there are hundreds and hun- 
dreds of other children and many of them 
Christian children, who long to have " Bal- 
vadi " to read, to hold in their hands, to 
press to their breasts, to look at the pictures 
from time to time, but alas ! their parents 
are too poor to give even the thirty-five 
cents per year for it ! 



If I were a rich man or woman I know 
what I would do ! I would be the happiest 
person in the world if I could assure the 
monthly visit of " Children's Garden " to 
every boy and girl in Gujarat, and there are 
over a million of them ! I would be doing 
a great work for God, too, for clean Chris- 
tian stories will bear fruit in the hearts of 
the India children even as they do in the 
hearts of children the world over. 



Introducing Mr. H. C. Ku 

ANNA CRUMPACKER 



HOW we wish you could see him, hear 
him plan for the progress of the mis- 
sion and feel the contagion of his 
optimistic Christian spirit! 

He was born near Ping Ting Chou a little 
more than thirty years ago. He was a very 
important baby, being the oldest son of the 
oldest son for several generations. All 
known means were used to guarantee life 
and intelligence to 
this unusually 
precious baby boy. 
On the third day of 
his life a proud 
happy grandfather 
went to the temple 
with a bit of red 
string and two 
cash. After the 
priest had blessed 
it, it was taken 
home to tie around 
the wee baby's 
neck. The plan 
was to repeat this 
each year for eleven years and then the 
twelfth year the boy must go himself. After 
the priest had been given the proper amount 
of money and a bit of incense and paper 
money had been burnt before the idol, the 
priest would cut the string and open a lock, 
which also was prepared for this occasion; 
long life and intelligence would thus be guar- 
anteed to the boy. 

The plan was most faithfully followed for 
eleven years, but a few days before the 
twelfth year was complete the mission school 
of Ping Ting Chou was opened and Hung 
Chuang had enrolled. Though he cried to go 
to the temple, permission could not be ob- 




MR. H. C. KU 



tained from the school authorities and the 
first real stir was felt in the Boys' School, as 
well as among some of the patrons. 

When Hung Chuang was about eight years 
old, his mother and younger brother died. 
His father contracted the opium habit, thus 
bringing untold sorrow and loneliness into 
his life. He says now that it was the story 
of Jesus loving little children that touched 
his heart and made him want to be a Chris- 
tian. He loved to play church. I recall dis- 
tinctly how he would sing and pray and 
preach in his play. He seemed to like that 
better than anything else. But these first 
years in school were much like the years of 
our other school boys. He cried hard when 
his long beautiful black cue had to be cut 
off. His father's opium habit deprived him 
of sufficient clothing and bedding. Frequent- 
ly these had to be furnished by the foreigner. 
On one occasion a missionary met him at the 
school gate. He had his bedding on his back, 
and a badly tear-stained face. His father 
had demanded that he pawn the bedding that 
had been given him in order that he might 
have opium. Fortunately the missionary was 
successful in his interference and afterward 
the father made no more such demands, but 
his further contributions toward the boy's 
board and keep were slight indeed. 

After four years in the Boys' School, Hung 
Chuang openly confessed Christ and was 
baptized. By this time he had become a 
leader in the religious activities of the school. 
Though never brilliant, he was a steady, 
hard-working pupil. His lessons were well 
learned and well remembered. In seven 
years he graduated from the grades and 
then entered the Oberlin Memorial Academy 
at Tai Ku. 



234 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 




-" w . • . 






ijr^' 




h:: » 



MR. KU'S WIFE AND BABY. She was gradu- 
ated from the girls' school and is now teaching half 
time in that school, besides caring for her home and 
baby. She is an ideal mother, taking such good care 
of the baby that it has never had a sick day. 



There he made an unusual record for sin- 
cere Christian conduct. His street preach- 
ing was also much appreciated. Though 
never really rugged, he grew tall, and his 
clean, happy countenance made him attrac- 
tive. After graduating from high school he 
had three years in the University of Peking, 
now known as Yen Ching University. 

At the close of that period he came back 
to the Ping Ting Boys' School, serving two 
years as teacher and now is serving his third 
year as principal. During this time he has 
won the respect of the entire community. At 
the first election for deacons in his home 
church he was one of the three elected and 
in this capacity he works with the same 
earnest conscientious spirit that always char- 
acterizes him. 

More than a year ago he was married to 
one of our Christian school girls. They have 



a happy, well kept home and are the proud 
parents of a lovely baby boy. 

When we think of the thin, sad-faced lit- 
tle boy who enrolled in school nearly eight- 
een years ago, and then look into the face 
of this strong Christian character, we can- 
not but think that he, too, has "increased in 
wisdom and stature and in favor with God 
and man." 

AN EVENING WITH F. C. ROHER 

(Continued from Page 223) 

compared to that of the Blue Ridge of the 
Carolinas. 

The work, the people, and the mountains 
are very interesting. Every state has its 
own peculiarities of speech. When I began 
to teach school our first year here, the chil- 
dren would look at me blankly when I tried 
to explain things. About the end of the year 
some one told me they couldn't understand 
what I said, that I talked "funny." The sit- 
uation was true from my side, too. But last 
summer while taking some boys to Washing- 
ton, D. C, a former North Carolinian com- 
plimented me by saying he thought I had 
been raised in North Carolina. 

Our schools? North Carolina has one of 
the finest school systems in the United 
States, but the mountain schools have not 
been brought up to date, yet. The country 
schools continue six months, usually finish- 
ing with half or two-thirds the number of 
students that started — if the teacher is a 
good one. 

Quarantine is not for the people here. The 
idea seems to be, "The children will have to 
have it sometime or other, anyway," the "it" 
being anything from chicken-pox to scarlet 
fever. 

Since our arrival in these parts we have 
felt that the greatest contribution we could 
make would be to help these weak churches 
to help themselves to secure or train workers 
for future leaders. Four years ago in this 
part of the district of North Carolina and 
South Carolina there were nine organized 
churches, five of which were working and 
the other four were practically dead. Today 
they are all moving forward with a working 
program. Besides, one new congregation 
has been organized and is ready to begin 
the erection of a churchhouse. Also, one 
(Continued on Page 267) 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



235 



Mission Schools Develop Christian Character 



I. W. MOOMAW 



IN one of our Mission Schools in India, 
a group of older boys were discussing 
whether or not a Christian farmer 
should work on Sunday. All agreed that it 
was contrary to Christ's teaching and that 
for a tired farmer and his tired oxen to 
have one day of rest in seven is sound 
business policy, too. But immediately to 
the minds of some came the question of 
guarding the ripening grain, corn, wheat 
and other cereals during the harvest season. 
During certain months it is essential for 
Indian farmers to guard their growing grain 
against the ravages of hordes of crows. 
Part of the boys believed that the birds, 
even the multitudes of crows, were God's 
creation. They could not produce food for 
themselves, so it would be only fair for the 
farmer to remain out of his fields on Sun- 
day and give the crows a. chance for one 
day in seven. The other boys reasoned that 
all the non-Christian farmers would be 
guarding their fields of grain on Sunday, and 
if the Christian farmers should not, the 
crows would " concentrate " on their few 
fields and clean them right up. 

They finally decided that a farmer was 
justified in guarding his fields of grain on 
Sunday, provided that if he could read, he 
would take his Bible along to the field, and 
that he would be sure to attend a church 
service in the evening. 

As a pattern for character training in 
mission schools we look to Jesus Christ. It 
is the knowledge of his way of life that 
sets up in the minds of Indian boys and 
girls those fine Christian attitudes which 
we so often find. Two of our missionaries 
have with great effort worked out a detailed 
Bible course beginning with the day a child 
enters school and continuing through his 
normal school training. The Bible has a 
definite place in the curricula of all our 
schools. The course of study is so outlined 
as to allow class discussions to center about 
real life situations like the one mentioned 
above. Where Indian students are led care- 
fully, they really enjoy a frank discussion 
of some of their problems. This we find is 
more desirable than merely to " preach " 
about Christian character. 



For older boys and girls the student 
council has been found very effective, not 
merely in discipline, but as a medium of 
character development. The students in 
such a case elect five of their number to 
act for the group in matters of discipline. 

One brilliant and likeable young lad per- 
sisted in smoking, a thing contrary to school 
discipline. After much persuasion on the 
part of his companions they decided that 
if he persisted in thus injuring his prospects 
for Christian service and in bringing re- 
proach on the entire group, he would forfeit 
the privilege of sitting down with the com- 
mon crowd to take his meals in the school 
dormitory. 

Very drastic, you say? I believe too 
that it was. But it worked after " preach- 
ing " had failed. 

You will be interested in a thing that 
happened nearly three years ago when some 
of the students in one of our mission schools 
had fallen into the habit of coming in late 
to the early morning chapel service. This 
annoyed the Indian Headmaster, who be- 
lieves strongly in promptness in attending 
chapel services. He called the matter to 
the attention of the student council, telling 
them it was their problem and that he 
hoped they would put an early end to it. 
That very day they decided that from then 
on the chapel doors would be locked when 
they had completed the second stanza of 
the first hymn. The few boys who arrived 
after the doors had been locked were as- 
signed some extra work in the evening on 
a job of excavation. This plan was highly 
successful, for it was not necessary for the 
boys to continue locking the doors after 
the first few days. But we never liked 
the idea of prescribing work as punishment. 
Honest toil is honorable and rarely should 
work be regarded as punishment. 

Probably more commendable even was 
the effort of some of our Indian school 
boys to find the ones of their number who 
had been " sneaking " some of their food. 
They had a common food supply and when 
it was learned that some of it was disap- 
pearing, there was cause for " righteous 
indignation." The matter came to a climax 



236 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 




INDIA SCHOOLBOYS learning the secrets of the soil, under the guidance of teachers who 
have learned the science. 



one Friday afternoon when the boys agreed 
corporately that they would eat no food, 
and that they would pray much, until the 
guilty lads would be found and would make 
their confession. That evening all the older 
boys, nearly sixty, went to bed without 
supper. Saturday morning after a. brief 
chapel service as usual, they went to work 
in their fields. There was no breakfast. 
At noon a group of tired, hungry boys came 
in from the fields. Instead of having dinner 
as usual they went straight to the river to 
wash their clothes, the usual Saturday after- 
noon task. All seemed satisfied to abide 
by the decision of the group. Late that 
evening the matter was cleared up by due 
confessions and the necessary discipline, and 
all enjoyed their supper. 

Missionaries and Indian leaders generally 
realize that many of the students committed 
to us have been deprived of the influence 
of a Christian home. Consequently every 
effort is made to surround them with life 
situations which will aid in the development 
of sound character. Gospel team evangelism, 
group projects in farming, the care of live- 
stock, vocational classes, older girls doing 
sewing for younger girls, management of 
cooperative school stores, a school bank, 
these and similar experiences provide a 
splendid environment for the development 
of character. In one school two boys are 
responsible for caring for those who may 



be sick. In some of- our girls' schools the 
older girls care for the smaller ones. 

Such illustrations might easily be multi- 
plied, but these few may give you an idea 
of how our mission schools serve in the 
development of Christian character. 

DEVELOPING CHINESE LEADERSHIP 

(Continued from Page 198) 

The hospital work at Shou Yang was de- 
veloped entirely under the supervision of 
Dr. Y. T. Hsing. The hospital has had 
neither foreign doctors nor foreign nurses 
to help in the work. The foreigners in the 
station have been advisors mostly in matters 
concerning finances. The total individual 
patients has more than doubled during the 
years 1925-1929, the total in 1929 being 1,493. 
Progress in Evangelism 

The work of the men's and women's Evan- 
gelistic departments had shown steady 
growth until the anti-foreign and anti- 
Christian outbreaks in 1926-1927. Since that 
time there has been a noticeable coldness 
and dropping off of Christian interest. This 
has been influenced by the memory of the 
cruel persecutions of Christians during the 
Boxer Rebellion in 1900. 

As the government becomes more stable 
there is an appreciable warming up of the 
Christian group. The Christians are gradu- 
ally coming to assume greater responsibility. 



J""e The Missionary Visitor 237 



1930 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

of the General Mission Board for the Year Ended February 28, 1930 

INCLUDING STATISTICS FROM THE FIELDS 



income- MISSION INCOME AND EXPENSE 

World Wide- 
Contributions for World Wide Missions 

(Schedule 27) $140,781.21 

Conference Budget (Schedule 14) 54,367.43 

Mary A. Culp Memorial Endowment (Schedule 

19) 30.00 

Mission Building and Contingent Reserve 

(Schedule 18) 67,136.30 

Bequests and Lapsed Annuities (Schedule 24).. 4,000.00 

Board of Religious Education Grant 5,000.00 $271,314.94 

India Mission (Schedule 1) 56,624.99 

China Mission (Schedule 2) 25,555.82 

Sweden Mission (Schedule 3) 2,386.22 

Denmark Mission (Schedule 4) 5.00 

Africa Mission (Schedule 5) 35,859.23 

Home Mission (Schedule 6) 18,027.61 

Memo — 

From Living Donors 327,613.49 

From other sources 82,160.32 

Total Mission Income $409,773.81 



Total Mission Income $409,773.81 

Deficit, March 1, 1929— 

World Wide Missions $130,517.37 

Less balances — 

India funds (Schedule 1) $ 15,219.01 

China funds (Schedule 2) 1,213.00 

Africa funds (Schedule 5) 12,284.76 

Denmark funds (Schedule 4) 1,429.13 30,145.90 $10*0,371.47 

Expense — 

Administration (Schedule 7) 9,832.31 

Missionary Education (Schedule 8) 14,617.14 

India Mission (Schedule 1) 125,910.01 

China Mission (Schedule 2) 49,626.93 

Sweden Mission (Schedule 3) 8,970.65 

Denmark Mission (Schedule 4) 177.74 

Africa Mission (Schedule 5) 30,329.10 

Home Mission (Schedule 6) 35,195.80 

Total Mission Expense 274,659.68 

Balance, Feb. 28, 1930 

India Funds (Schedule 1) 19,578.44 

China funds (Schedule 2) 1,213.00 

Africa funds (Schedule 5) 17,814.89 

Denmark funds (Schedule 4) 1,429.13 40,035.46 

Less deficit World Wide Funds 5,292.80 34,742.66 

$409,773.81 



238 The Missionary Visitor J™ e 

BALANCE SHEET 
as at Feb. 28, 1930 

Assets 
Cash — 

Cash in office < ..$ 300.00 

Cash in bank 13,92478 $ 14,224.98 

Commercial Notes— short term 133,278.21 

Accounts Receivable — 

Foreign bills paid and advances 3,934.15 

Gish Testament Fund — Overdrawn — (Schedule 14) 1,155.55 

Income Special 6,889.62 11,979.32 

Advances to Field Treasurers 

(Schedule 21) ...... 60,025.45 

Total current resources 219,507.96 

General Securities 

Church Extension Bills Receivable (Schedule 16) 30,304.03 

Contingent Investments Receivable 119,052.60 149,356.63 

Investments for Endowments and Annuities — 

First Mortgage Farm Loans 999,612.02 

City Real Estate Bonds 202,261.50 . 

Public Utility Bonds 458,489.50 

Railroad Bonds 64,122.43 

Brethren Publishing House 50,000.00 

Advances on Real Estate 34,061.83 

1,808,545.28 
Less Reserve for investment losses 43,515.43 1,765,029.85 

$2,133,894.44 



Liabilities 

Notes Payable (Schedule 23) $ 18,027.36 

Transmission Certificates (Schedule 22) 1,867.94 $ 19,895.30 

Specific Funds — unexpended balances — 

Ministerial and Missionary Relief (Schedule 13) 20,477.68 

Miscellaneous Funds (Schedule 14) 22,892.55 43,370.23 



Total current liabilities 63,265.53 

Reserve Funds — 

Mission Building and Contingent Reserve Fund 

(Schedule 18) 48,214.58 

Reserve for Mission Advances 62,423.93 

Mission Surplus 34,742.66 145,381.17 

Special Funds — 

Church Extension Fund (Schedule 15) 43,198.46 

Contingent Agreements (Schedule 17) 119,052.60 162,251.06 

Endowment and Annuity Funds — 

Mission endowment balances (Schedule 9) 742,927.48 

Miscellaneous endowment balances (Schedule 10) 111,749.95 

Endowment annuity bonds (Schedule 11) 595,690.97 

Mission Annuity bonds (Schedule 12) 312,628.28 ' 1,762,996.68 

$2,133,894.44 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



239 



SCHEDULES 
1. India Mission Fund 



Balances March 1, 1929— 

Q u i n t e r Memorial 

Fund 

India Village Church 

Fund 

Anklesvar Church 

House Fund 

Vyara Church Bldg. 

Fund 

Receipts — 

Contributions — 

India General dona- 
tions $ 2,806.56 

India Native Work- 
ers 550.25 

India Boarding 

Schools 1,274.13 

India Share Plan .... 5,166.26 

Dahanu Hospital .. 15.00 

McCann Memorial 
Church 111.92 

India Hospitals .... 57.00 

India Widows Home 3.65 

India Missionary- 
Supports 30,927.69 

Vyara Church Bldg. 4,186.89 

Ahwa Church Bldg. 60.62 

Student F. F. 1928- 
1929 422.35 

Aid Society Mission 
Fund 1927 5,475.96 

Foreign Mission 
Fund 2,667.41 

Junior League 1930 48.15 

Junior League 1928 619.47 

B. Y. P. D. 1928.... 159.50 

B. Y. P. D. 1929.... 1,343.92 



$ 6,571.91 
950.00 
5,637.49 
2,059.61 $ 15,219.01 



Endowment Income 
(Schedule 19) 
India General en- 
dowment 567.54 

Rohrer Memorial .. 60.00 

Bequests & Annuities 
(Schedule 24) 

Total receipts 

From World Wide 
Fund to balance 



Expenditures — 
American Missionaries — 

Supports 

Medical expenses .. 

Furlough rents 

Sending to field 

Doctors' literature .. 
Publications to Field 
Rural Life Study of 

I. M. C 

Unclassified expense. 

Total expense di- 
rected from home 

office 

Annual Budget Ex- 
penses (Field Oper- 
ating) 
Ahwa — 
Boys' Boarding 

School $ 829.79 

Evangelistic 1,933.94 

Girls' Boarding 

School 412.30 

Medical 157.28 

Property. Expense .. 524.25 
Women's Work .... 123.63 



Anklesvar — 

Evangelistic 1,842.91 

Girls' Boarding 

School 3,736.17 

Industrial School ... 118.67 

Practical Arts 436.34 

Property Expense .. 582.25 

Dist. Property Ex- 
pense 179.80 

Station Expense 357.75 

Vocational Training 

School 3,229.68 

Less Farm Income.. 8.09 



Bulsar — 

Boys' Board. School 2,699.22 
W a n k a 1 Boarding 

School 2,531.18 

Evangelistic 2,217.46 

Khergara Girls' 

Boarding 1,854.54 

Industrial School ... 373.45 

Property Expense . . 733.02 
W a n k a 1 Property 

Expense 123.63 

Station Expense 866.68 

Women's Work .... 139.63 

Less Medical Income 215.43 





Dahanu — 






Evangelistic 


764.62 




Girls' Board. School 


1,440.48 




Medical 


871.08 




Property Expense . . 
Jalalpor — 


466.95 








Evangelistic 


3,041.23 




Girls' Board. School 


1,915.01 




Property Expense .. 


169.06 




Station Expense ... 
Palghar— 


978.22 








Boys' Board. School 


2,700.88 


55,896.73 


Evangelistic 


570.14 




Industrial School ... 


332.51 




Property Expense .. 
Umalla — 


200.65 








Boys' Board. School 


3,486.23 


627.54 


Evangelistic — Vali . . 
Evangelistic — Am- 


1,187.87 




letha 


635.93 


100.72 


Industrial School . . . 


70.71 






34 77 


56,624.99 


Property Expense .. 


216.84 




Station Expense 


351.87 


73,644.45 










Vada— 
Dist. Board. School 




$145,488.45 


1,054.89 




Evangelistic 


1,421.12 




Property Expense . . 


181.44 




Women's Work 


78.32 


34,143.59 


Vyara — 




1,132.75 


Boys' Board. School 


3,502.61 


202.59 


Evangelistic 


3,351.05 


7,290.51 
200.00 


Girls' Board. School 


2,396.70 


Industrial School ... 


525.39 


174.28 


Property Expense .. 


362.22 


100.00 


Station Expense 

General — 


339.64 


215.20 






Administrative Of- 






fices 


733.34 


$ 43,458.92 


Baby Home 

Bible School— 


1,059.75 






1,807.67 




Bible School— 




Marathi 


947.88 




Council Fees 


219.63 




Famine Relief 


720.24 




Furlough 


7,105.60 




Income Tax 


35.45 




Landour Property 








138 91 




Language School ... 


94.25 




Medical 


210.07 


3,981.19 


Miss. Child. School 






Expense 


544.69 



10,475.4 



11,323.38 



3,543.13 



6,103.52 



3,804.18 



5,984.22 



2,735.77 



10,477.61 



240 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



Publishing 525.38 

Social Welfare 36.36 

Training 374.36 

Vacations 1,067.55 

Widows' Home 362.09 



15,983.22 



Total Annual Budget 
Expense 

New Property (new 
land, buildings, and 
equipment) 

Ahwa — 
Stable 


181.82 
363.33 


472.73 


Anklesvar— 
Villages Houses 
Well Boring . 




545.15 








Bulsar — 

Khergam Cookhouse 
Dahanu— 


72.% 
235.93 


710.91 


Toilets 




308.79 


Jalalpor — 

Fence 

Palghar— 

Boys' hostel .... 
Vada— 

Well 






109.09 

727.27 
109.09 


General — 




145.46 









Total New Property 
projects completed . 
Cost of partly com- 
pleted projects (to 
be itemized when 
completed) 

Less— the same last 
year 

Actual New Property 

expenditures 

Loss in exchange — 

On Supports 

On Annual Budget 

Expenses 

On New Property 
Expenses 

Total Expenses 

Balances, February 28, 
1930— 

Quinter Memorial 

Fund 

India Village Church 

Fund 

Anklesvar Church 

House Fund 

Vyara Church Bldg. 

Fund 

Ahwa Church Bldg. 

Fund 



3,128.49 



9,664.£ 



74,411.70 



12,793.38 




4,932.18 






7,861.20 


51.72 




114.39 




12.08 


178.19 




125,910.01 


6,571.91 




950.00 




5,749.41 




6,246.50 




60.62 


19,578.44 




$145,488.45 



2. China Mission Fund 



Balances, March 1, 
1929— 

Liao Chow Girls' 

School Building . . . 
Ping Ting Girls' 

Dormitory Fund . . 

Receipts 

Contributions — 
China general dona- 
tions $ 2,493.51 

China native worker 344.93 

China Boys' School 90.52 

China Girls' School 51.03 

China Share Plan 2,334.03 

China Hospitals .... 10.00 



813.00 

400.00 $ 1,213.00 



China Missionary 

Supports 16,964.78 

Liao Chow Hospital 60.00 
Student F. F.— 1928- 

1929 853.48 

Foreign Missions ... 1,333.71 

B. Y. P. D 854.75 

Junior League, 1930 24.08 



Endowment Income 
(Schedule 19) 

Total Receipts 

From World Wide 
Fund to balance ... 



Expenditures — 
American Missionaries — 
Supports 

Medical expense . . . 

Furlough rents 

Sending to Field.... 

To Annual Confer- 
ence 

Publications to field 

War Emergency ex- 
pense 

Tung Chow School 
Support 

Unclassified expense 

Total expenses di- 
rected from home 
office 

Annual Budget Expenses — 

(Field Operating) 

Liao Chow — 

Rent $ 31.66 

Repairs 603.43 

Boys' School 972.64 

Girls' School ....... 994.81 

Men's Evangelistic. 1,308.94 
Women's Evangelis- 
tic 918.92 

Medical 1,678.20 

Language Teacher .. 90.75 

Miscellaneous 105.03 

Ping Ting- 
Rent 38.33 

Repair 354.03 

Boys' School 1,181.29 

Girls' School 988.01 

Men's Evangelistic. 1,275.00 

Medical 1,926.93 

Language Teacher .. 90.00 

Miscellaneous 79.22 

Village School 233.75 

Show Yang — 

Repairs 232.54 

Boys' School 1,046.28 

Girls' School 613.37 

Men's Evangelistic. 857.71 
Women's Evangelis- 
tic 202.22 

Medical 632.42 

Language Teacher .. 162.00 

Chinese Buyer 59.90 

Miscellaneous 102.09 

Tai Yuan- 
Rent 566.76 

Repairs 173.48 

Men's Evangelistic. 603.74 
Women's Evangelis- 
tic 182.49 

Language Teacher .. 33.00 

Miscellaneous 21.81 

General- 
Agency Hire 205.61 

Building Department 
Expense Fund .18 



25,414.82 



141.00 



, 


25,555.82 




24,071.11 




$ 50,839.93 


$ 20,512.68 

744.30 

223.72 

5,525.33 




44.98 
83.25 




694.44 




911.74 
16.83 






$ 28,761.28 



6,704.38 



6,166.56 



3,908.53 



1,581.28 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



241 



Inter-furloughs 300.00 

Miscellaneous 418.11 

Scholarships 210.00 

T'ung Chow Tuition 70.00 

Chihli, Shansi, Chris- 
tian Education As- 
sociation 53.12 

National Christian 

Council 204.00 

Middle School - 914.08 2,375.10 

Total Annual Budget 

Expenses 20,735.85 

New Property (new 
land, buildings, and 
equipment) 
Liao Chow- 
Alteration and equip- 
ment 

Women's Work 300.00 

Ping Ting Chow — 
Middle School Li- 
brary 15.04 

Repair Hospital Roof 1,250.00 1,265.04 

Total New Property 

projects completed 1,565.04 

Cost of partly com- 
pletely projects (to 
be itemized when 
completed) 344.93 

1,909.97 
Less the same last 
year 286.82 

Actual New Property 

Expenditures 1,623.15 

Specials — 

Ford motor car 941.17 

Shrinkage building 
materials 485.06 1,426.23 

Gross Expenditures .. 52,546.51 

Less — Exchange gain — 
On Annual Budget 

items 2,299.53 

On New Property 
items 180.00 2,479.53 

. Rent Tientsin Prop- 
erty 162.48 

Sale Liao Chow prop- 
erty and adjust- 
ment of accounts 252.98 

Sale motorcycle 10.89 

Rent Ping Ting 
Chow property ... 13.70 2,919.58 

Total expenditures ... 49,626.93 

Balances, February 28, 
1930— 

Liao Chow Girls' 

School Building .. 813.00 

Ping Ting Girls' 

Dormitory Fund .. 400.00 1,213.00 



$ 50,839.93 



3. Sweden 
Receipts — 

Contributions- 
Sweden general do- 
nations 

Sweden Missionary 
supports 

From World Wide 
Fund to balance 

Fund to balance 

Expenditures — 
American Missionaries — 
Supports 



Mission Fund 



$ 232,05 

2,154.17 $ 2,386.22 



6,584.43 
$ 8,970.65 



Sending to field 

Outfit allowance — new 

missionary 

Publications to field 
Unclassified expense 

Total expense directed 

from home office 

(Field Operating) 

Annual Budget Expense 

Malmo — 

Publications $ 171.81 

Traveling 257.23 

Native Worker 482.40 

Native Worker rent 53.60 

Graybill rent 146.44 

Missionaries taxes . . 171.75 

Vannaberger — 

Native Worker 482.40 

Property expense ... 21.21 

Traveling 67.00 

Tingsryd — 

Native Worker 482.40 

House and hall rent 201.00 

Traveling 40.20 

Kjavlinge — 

Native Worker 482.40 

House rent 127.57 

Traveling expense .. 28.14 

Olserod— 

Native worker 482.40 

Property expense ... 82.63 

Traveling expense .. 40.20 

General — 
Furloughs 

Total Annual Budget 

expense 

New Property (new 

land, buildings, and 

equipment) 
Malmo — 

Part payment 
Church building . . 

Gross expenses 

Less exchange gain — 

On Supports 

On Annual Budget 
items 



527.93 

225.00 
11.90 
21.92 



$ 2,935.96 



1,283.23 



570.61 



723.60 



638.11 



605.23 
225.21 



4,045.99 



2,000.00 
8,981.95 



7.32 11.30 



4. Denmark Mission Fund 
Balance, March 1, 1929— 

Denmark Church 
Fund 



House 
Receipts — 

General donations .. 

From World Wide 

Fund to balance.. 



Expenditures — 

Johanson traveling 
expense 

Interest on Church 
loan 

Publishing literature 

Publications to field 

Gross expenditures .. 
Less exchange gain. 



$ 8,970.65 



$ 1,429.13 
5.00 



172.74 



$ 1,606.87 



25.14 

73.57 
77.11 
2.54 



$ 178.36 
.62 

177.74 



February 28, 



Balance, 
1930— 

Denmark Church 
House Fund 



$ 2,149.21 



242 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 

1930 



5. Africa Mission Fund 

Balances, March 1, 1929— 
Ruth Royer Kulp 
Memorial Hospital 

Fund 

Receipts — 
Contributions — 

Africa General $11,183.14 

Africa Missionary 

Supports 11,459.86 

Africa Share Plan... 1,444.36 
Student F. F.— 1928- 

1929 donations .... 2,236.45 
Student F. F.— 1929- 

1930 donations .... 723.80 
Foreign Missions ... 1,333.71 
Junior League 1929 

donations 5,731.97 

B. Y. P. D. 1929 do- 
nations 597.11 

Junior League 1930.. 24.07 $34,734.47 

Bequests (Schedule 24) 100.73 
Special leper work in- 
come 1,024.03 1,124.76 

Total receipts 



$ 12,284.76 



35,859.23 
$ 48,143.99 



Expenditures — 
American Missionaries — 
Supports 

Doctors' literature .." 

Furlough rents 

Educational prepara- 
tion 

Outfit — new workers 

Medical expense ... 

Sending to field 

Publications to field 

Committee of Refer- 
ence and counsel — 
Oldhan 

Christian Literature 
Work 

Exchange on money 

Unclassified expense 

Total expense directed 

from home office 

Annual Budget Expenses 

(Field Operating) 

Garkida — 

Girls' School $ 280.42 

Boys' School 753.30 

Medical Fund 1,312.20 

Evangelistic Fund .. 285.95 
Residence Equipment 1,093.50 
Upkeep of Premises. 573.48 

Upkeep of Shop 218.01 

General Expense ... 621.95 
Mail and Messenger 265.94 

Lassa— 

Educational Fund... 202.67 

Medical Fund 434.58 

Evangelistic 230.73 

Residence Equipment 413.10 

Upkeep of Premises 171.07 

Upkeep of Shop 48.60 

General Expense 416.34 

Mail and Messenger 139.93 



10,423.34 
100.00 
80.00 

318.79 

300.00 

189.00 

1,858.65 

53.09 



75.00 

77.27 
52.87 
15.99 



$ 13,544.00 



5,404.75 



2,057.02 



Gardemna — 






Education Fund .... 


138.09 




Evangelistic Fund . . 


143.20 




Residence Equipment 


147.25 




Upkeep of Premises 


68.23 




Upkeep of Shop 


42.83 




General Expense ... 


129.28 


668.88 


General — 






Furloughs 




2,856.81 





Total Annual Budget 

Expenses 

New Property (new 
land, buildings, and 
equipment) 
Garkida — 
Educational Buildings 291.60 
Boys' School Build- 
ing .86 

Remodel Hospital for 
Girls' School Build- 
ing 194.40 

General — 
Missionary R e s i- 

dences 972.00 

Circular Saw 156.86 

Organ 81.26 

Lathe 64.93 

Motor Car 5 917.69 

Total new property 
projects completed . . 
Cost of partly com- 
pleted projects (to be 
itemized when 
completed) 



Less the same last 
year 



10,987.46 



729.00 
1,215.00 



2,192.74 



3,407.74 



10,885.17 

14,292.91 

8,485.65 



Actual New Property 
Expense 



5,807.26 



Gross expenditures . . 
Less gain in exchange — 
On Annual Budget 


6.48 
3.14 


30,338.72 


On New Property 


9.62 







Net expenditures 
Balances, February 28, 
1930— 

General Fund 

Ruth Royer Kulp 
Memorial Hospital 
Fund 



5,530.13 
12,284.76 



30,329.10 



17,814.89 
$ 48,143.99 



6. Home Mission Fund 

Receipts — 

Contributions — 

Home General Do- 
nations $ 13,384.69 

Greene County, Vir- 
ginia, Mission do- 
nations 407.67 

Home Mission Share 
Plan 235.25 $ 14,027.61 

Bequests and Lapsed 
Annuities (Schedule 

24) 4,000.00 

Total receipts 

Balance from World 
Wide Fund to bal- 
ance 



Expenditures — 

Aid to Districts — 

(through pastorates) 

and interest church 

loans) 
Southern California 

and Arizona 

Florida and Georgia 
Idaho and Western 

era Montana 

Northern Illinois and 

Wisconsin 

Southern Iowa 



$ 18,027.61 

17,168.19 
$ 35,195.80 



$ 180.00 
599.98 

1,999.96 

1,782.46 
425.00 



June 
1930 

Southeastern Kansas 
Western Maryland. . 


3,876.41 

720.00 

1,049.21 

16.35 
99.96 

55.48 
42.35 
200.00 
270.00 


Th 

1,249.96 
350.00 
500.00 


Middle Missouri .... 
Northern Missouri.. 
Southern Missouri 

and Arkansas 

North and South 


424.96 
712.50 

549.96 

450.00 


North Dakota and 
Eastern Montana . 


150.00 
1,155.00 


Northwestern Ohio.. 

Oklahoma, Panhandle 

of Texas, and New 


949.96 
1,369.98 


Oregon 

Tennessee and 

Southern Alabama.. 

Texas and Louisi- 


2,854.98 

2,094.90 

150.00 


Eastern Virginia ... 
Southern Virginia . . . 

Washington 

Eastern Maryland . . 
Western Penn- 


124.98 

486.18 

2,150.00 

300.00 

1,000.00 


Northeastern Ohio.. 

Traveling' Evangelists — 
Okla. and N. Mex., 
So. Mo., 2nd W. 
Va., W. Md., E. 
Md.*, S. E. Pa.*, 
Tenn 


1,720.00 

2,068.90 
1,533.06 


Less offerings re- 




*Offerings in these 
districts overpaid 
expenses. 

Miscellaneous — 
Home Mission Coun- 
cil 




Greene Co., Va., Mission 

School operation — 
Workers' wages ....$ 
Pastor 




Commissary 

Board members ex- 




Dormitory equipment 

Office supplies 

Telephone dues 

Light Plant 

Heating Plant 


6,329.76 


Farm Operation — 


698.11 
193.37 
146.53 
48.30 
50.38 
48.27 
49.98 

422.80 

191.23 

27.25 

74.95 

199.53 




Fertilizer and lime.. 

Seed 

Cow feed 

Spray materials 

Fence 

Tools and repairs... 
General expenses — 




Tires and repairs 

Motor licenses 




Miscellaneous 


2,150.70 


New Property — 
Silo 


242.45 
26.23 




Projects not com- 
pleted 


268.68 


Gross expenses 

Less income from — 
Board, room and tu- 


1,774.87 

888.04 

15.72 


8,749.14 


Farm cash income.. 
Miscellaneous 


2,678.63 


Home Secretary De- 
partment expense 

Advisory Council ... 




65.64 



The Missionary Visitor 



243 



$ 23,730.76 



535.84 



150.00 



General literature . . 


29.81 




Information Service. 


7.90 




Miscellaneous 


5.00 




Office rent 


131.00 




Stationery and sup- 






plies 


39.99 




Office equipment ... 


48.00 




Postage and mailing 


89.48 




Salaries and office 






help 


3,517.43 




Telephone and tele- 






graph 


27.78 




Traveling expense . 


746.66 


4,708.69 






$ 35,195.80 



6,070.51 



7. Administration Expense 

General Secretary's 
Department — 

Board Meetings .... $ 726.81 

Information Service. 30.70 

Committee of Refer- 
ence and Counsel.. 551.67 

Miscellaneous 48.46 

Office rent 218.00 

Office stationery and 

supplies 60.60 

Office equipment ... 38.00 

Postage 49.54 

Salaries and office 
help 3,727.58 

Student Volunteer 
Work 28.77 

Telephone and tele- 
graph 41.05 

Traveling expense 205.23 $ 5,726.41 

Treasurer's Department — 

Auditing 120.00 

Fidelity bonds 27.50 

Interest on borrowed 

money 785.20 

Miscellaneous 27.87 

Office rent 186.00 

Office stationery and 

supplies 214.82 

Postage and mailing 276.91 

Salaries and office 

help 2,371.36 

Telephone and tele- 
graph 37.48 

Traveling expense . 58.76 4,105.90 

Total Administration 
expense $ 9,832.31 

8. Missionary Education 

Missionary Visitor 

Illustrating $ 549.28 

Binding files 63.47 

Subscription blanks. 101.74 

Printing and mail- 
ing (average circu- 
lation 13,189) 5,656.34 $ 6,370.83 

Less paid subscrip- 
tions 347.13 $ 6,023.70 

General 

Deputation traveling 139.76 

Exhibits 54.49 

Mimeograph sup- 
plies 331.18 

Missionary Education 

Movement 119.00 

Miscellaneous 17.00 

Mission Study 

Outside purchases . . 299.93 

Our publications ... .70 

Office rent 349.00 

Office stationery and 

supplies 139.26 

Office equipment ... 181.25 

Traveling 154.60 



244 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



Pamphlets, leaflets, 
etc 1,168.66 

Postage and mail- 
ing 1,228.52 

Salaries and office 
help .. 4,644.86 

Stereopticons and 
slides 67.49 

Telephone and tele- 
graph 29.60 8,925.30 

Less sales of — 

Outside purchases . . 230.81 

Our publications 74.55 

Slide rentals 26.50 331.86 

Net general expenses. 

Total Missionary Ed- 
ucation expense 

9. Mission Endowment 

World Wide- 
Balance, March 1, 

1929 $600,098.34 

Receipts numbered — 

112325 ...$ 500.00 

112641 . . . 350.00 

112994 ... 8,235.14 

114418 ... 15.00 

114704 ... 40.00 

115139 ... 30.00 

115223 . . . 500.00 

118730 . . . 500.00 

119145 . . . 50.00 



8,593.44 



$ 14,617.14 



$ 10,220.14 
Transfers — 
From annuities 

(Schedule 11) 

Death lapses 

(Schedule 11) 

$68,150.00 

Surrendered bond 
Schedule 11) 

.$ 250.00 

Surrendered mis- 
sion annuity 
(Schedule 12) 
$50,000.00 118,400.00 



Bequests 
(Schedule 24) 



900.00 129,520.14 



Balance February 28, 
1930 

India — 
Balance March 1, 

1929 

No receipts 

Balance February 28, 

1930 

China- 
Balance March 1, 

1929 

No receipts 

Balance February 28, 

1930 

H. H. Rohrer Memorial — 

Balance March 1, 

1929 

No receipts 

Balance February 28, 

1930 

Mary A. Culp Memorial — 

Balance March 1, 

1929 

No receipts 

Balance February 28, 

1930 

Total Mission En- 
dowment 



9,459.00 



2,350.00 



1,000.00 



500.00 



$729,618.48 



9,459.00 



2,350.00 



1,000.00 



500.00 



$742,927.48 



10. Miscellaneous Endowment 
Ministerial & Mission- 
ary Relief — 

Balance March 1, 

1929 $ 10.09 

No receipts 

Balance February 28, 

1930 $ 10.00 

Gospel Messenger — 

Balance March 1, 

1929 16,736.56 

Receipts numbered — 

112516 $25.00 

112613 25.00 

112721 25.00 

117094 25.00 $ 100.00 

Transfers — 
Bequests (Schedule 
24) 935.73 1,035.73 

Balance February 28, 

1930 17,772.29 

Gish Estate — 

Balance March 1, 

1929 56,667.08 

No receipts 

Balance February 28, 

1930 56,667.08 

D. C. Moomaw Memorial — 

Balance March 1, 

1929 8,819.90 

No receipts 

Balance February 28, 

1930 8,819.90 

Book and Tract — 

Balance March 1, 

1929 28,460.68 

Receipt numbered — 

115736 20.00 

Balance February 28, 

1930 28,480.68 

Total Miscellaneous 
Endowment $111,749.95 

11. Endowment Annuity Bonds 

Balance March 1, 1929 $637,570.97 

Recipts numbered — 

112400 . . .$ 100.00 

112401 ... 125.00 
112488 ... 15,000.00 
112711 ... 400.00 
113133 ... 3,000.00 
114895 ... 500.00 
115300 ... 500.00 
115739 ... 1,750.00 
115797 . . . 500.00 
116271 ... 1,000.00 
116421 ... 1,800.00 
116644 ... 500.00 
116737 ... 200.00 
117000 ... 300.00 
118019 ... 100.00 
118577 ... 100.00 
119144 ... 20.00 
119422 ... 100.00 
119917 ... 25.00 
120156 . . . 500.00 



Total receipts 



Less transfers — 
To World Wide En- 
dowment (Schedule 
9) 

Death lapses $68,150.00 

Surrendered annuity 250.00 



26,520.00 
664.090.97 



68,400.00 



Balance February 
1930 



28, 



$595,690.97 



June 




1930 






12. Missio 


Balance 


March 1, 1929 


Receipts 


numbered — 


112499. . 


...$ 500.00 


112670.. 


500.00 


112808., 


,... 1,000.00 


113033., 


200.00 


114166., 


,... 3,000.00 


114168.. 


. . . 500.00 


114999.. 


. .. 1,000.00 


115116.. 


,... 10,000.00 


115309. 


150.00 


116422.. 


20.00 


116821., 


400.00 


J263. 


. . . . 3,844.78 


117044. 


. . . . 2,500.00 


117669. 


150.00 


118573. 


500.00 


119449.. 


... 3,000.00 


119523., 


.... 1,200.00 


Total Receipts 



The Missionary Visitor 



$352,863.50 



28,464.78 
381,328.28 



Less transfers— 

To World Wide En- 
dowment (Sched- 
ule 9) 

Surrendered annuity $ 50,000.00 

To Bequests and 
Lapsed Annuities 
(death lapses — 
Schedule 24) 17,793.41 

To Tearcoat Congre- 
gation, First W. 
Virginia 906.59 



68,700.00 



Balance February 
1930 



28, 



$312,628.28 

13. Ministerial and Missionary Relief 

Balance March 1, 1929 $ 29,657.08 

Receipts — 
Brethren Pub. House 

(Schedule 25) $ 2,000.00 

Gish Estate endow- 
ment (Schedule 19) 680.00 
General endowment 

(Schedule 19) .60 

Bequests and lapsed 
annuities (Schedule 
24) 2,500.00 



Expenditures — 
In assistance to mis- 



sionaries, i 
ters, their 
or orphans 



l l n i s- 
widows 



5,180.60 
34,837.68 



14,360.00 



Balance 
1930 . 



Februai 



$ 20,477.68 



14. Miscellaneous Funds 

General Relief and Re- 
construction — 

Balance March 1, 1929 $ 126.51 

Receipts — 
Donations — 

Near East Relief.... $ 579.44 

General Relief 2.00 

China Famine Relief 3,452.70 

Flood Relief 148.50 

Sweden Relief 10.00 4,192.64 

4,319.15 
Expenditures — 

Near East Relief, 
Pittsburgh 30.00 

Near East Relief, 
New York 549.44 

China Famine Re- 
lief, Inc., New 
York 3,452.70 

American Red Cross, 
Washington 148.50 



Sweden Mission, 
Treas 10.00 

Balance February 28, 

1930 

Sundry Balances* 

Japan Mission 

Philippine Mission . 

Porto Rico Mission 

Arab Mission 

South America Mis- 
sion 

New England Mis- 
sion 

Cuba Mission 

Australia Mission . . 

Jerusalem Mission .. 

*Same balances as a year ago. 
Italian Mission 
Receipts — 

Donations 

Expenditures — 
Sent to D. M. B. of 
S. E. Pa., N. J. & 
N. Y 

Student Loan Fund — 

Balance March 1, 

1929 

No receipts or ex- 
penditures 

Balance February 28, 

1930 

Stover Lecture Foun- 
dation — 

Balance March 1, 

1929 

Receipts — 

Interest from invest- 
ment 58.20 

Payment on principal 200.00 



,190.64 



245 



128.51 



81.40 

234.42 
50.00 

152.34 

202.50 

331.27 

16.00 

200.66 



5.00 



5.00 



7,890.39 



7,890.39 



Expenditures — 

Reinvestment of prin- 
cipal 

Balance February 28, 

1930 

Gish Publishing Fund* — 

Balance March 1, 
1929 

Receipts — 

By sales of books 1,991.10 

Gish Estate endow- 
ment (Schedule 19) 2,720.02 



393.87 



258.20 
652.07 



189.61 



4,132.65 



462.46 



,711.12 

8,843.77 
Expenditures — 
Purchase of books.. 4,176.66 

Manuscript 90.00 

Printing 16.87 4,283.53 

Balance February 28, 
1930 

*See details elsewhere in this issue. 
Conference Budget — 

Receipts — 
Contributions — 

Conference Budget.. 84,752.14 

Conference Budget 
designated 525.68 85,277.82 

Expenditures — 
General Expense — 

Literature and gen- 
eral printing 586.56 

Miscellaneous 12.40 

Office equipment ... 21.25 

Office stationery and 
supplies 97.99 

Postage and mailing 477.10 

Office rent 122.50 

Salaries and office 
help 4,723.31 



,560.24 



246 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 

1930 



Traveling expense 



172.81 





6,213.92 




Distribution — 






World Wide Mission 


54,367.43 




Board of Religious 








15,363.88 




General Education 






Board 


3,551.84. 




General Ministerial 








5,367.84 




American Bible So- 






412.91 


85,277.82 






Book and Tract Work- 






Balance March 1, 






1929 




5,185.89 


Receipts — 






Endowment note in- 






terest 


55.85 




Endowment income 






(Schedule 19) .... 


1,708.14 




Sale of tracts 


8.31 


1,772.29 






6,958.18 


Expenditures — 






Missionary Gospel 






Messengers 


181.00 




Rebates on endow- 






ment 


56.23 




Tract Mailing 


44.35 




Tract Publication... 


143.28 




Administration 


16.41 


441.27 



Balance February 28, 

1930 

Gish Testament Fund — 

Deficit, March 1, 
1929 

Receipts — By Breth- 
Publishing House 
Sales (Schedule 25) 



6,516.91 



1,407.68 
252.13 



Deficit February 28, 
1930 


1,155.55 
2,100.21 

133.56 


Denmark Poor Fund — 

Balance March 1, 
1929 

No receipts 

Expenditures — 

In assistance to 
Danish brother ... 


Balance February 28, 
1930 


1,966.65 


Total of Miscellaneous 
Funds $22,892.55 

15. Church Extension Fund 

Balance March 1, 1929 $ 42,953.41 
Receipts — 
Interest on loans... 370.05 


Expenditures — 
Loss on Bright Star 
Oklahoma loan ... 


43,323.46 
125.00 


Balance February 28, 
1930 


$ 43.198.46 



16. Church Extension Bills Receivable 

1, 1929 $ 29,726.03 



Balance March 
Loans made- 
First Church, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y 



1,500.00 



Payments on loans — 
Figarden, Calif. . . 

Rockford, 111 

Fresno, Calif 

Detroit, Mich 

Lakeland, Fla 

Brooksville, Fla. .. 



34,226.03 



700.00 
800.00 
500.00 
500.00 
107.00 
60.00 



Battle Creek, Mich. 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Johnson City, Tenn. 



450.00 
280.00 
400.00 



Loss on Bright Star, 
Okla 



3,797.00 
125.00 



3,922.00 



Balance 
1930 . 



February 28, 



$ 30,304.03 



17. Contingent Agreements 

$138,582.41 



Balance, March 1, 1929 
Receipts — 
Eight new entries.. 



Transfers — 
To various 
accounts . 



1,720.59 
140,303.00 

21,250.40 



Balance February 
1930 



28, 



$119,052.60 

18. Mission Building and Contingent Reserve 

Balance March 1, 1929 $ 71,933.48 

Receipts — 
Bequests and Lapsed 

Annuities (Sched- 
ule 24) $ 10,200.10 

Brethren Pub. House 

earnings (Schedule 

25) 8,000.00 

Investment Income 

and Expense 

(Schedule 19) 20,217.30 

Brethren Publishing 

House Reserve ... 5,000.00 



Expenditures — 
Transfer to World 
Wide Fund 



43,417.40 
115,350.88 

67,136.30 



Balance February 
1930 



28, 



$ 48,214.58 



19. Investment Income and Expense 

Receipts — 

Interest received from — 
Endowment contracts $ 339.51 

Farm Mortgage 

loans 49,651.56 

Public Utility bonds 19,076.00 

Railroad bonds 2,604.93 

City Real E s ta t e 

bonds ....$10,239.23 

Less premiums write- 



off 



87.50 10,151.73 



Short Term loans... 




3,628.03 


Local bank balances 




712.89 


Foreign bank bal- 






ances 




487.41 


Concessions on bond 






purchases 




292.25 $ 86,944.31 


Expenditures — 




Annuities paid 




54,206.84 


Endowment income 






transferred — 






R o h r e r Memorial 






(Schedule 1) 


60.00 




India general .(Sched- 






ule 1) 


567.54 




China general (Sched- 






ule 2) 


141.00 




Ministerial & Mis- 






sionary Relief 






(Schedule 13) 


.60 




Gish Estate- 






Publishing Fund 






(Schedule 14) .... 


2,720.02 




Ministerial and Mis- 






sionary Relief 






(Schedule 13) .... 


680.00 





June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



247 



D. C Moomaw's Me- 
morial 529.19 

C. C. Wenger Trust 180.00 

Book and Tract 
Work (Schedule 
14) 1,708.14 

Gospel Messenger 

(Schedule 25) 1,045.84 

Mary A. Culp Me- 
morial 30.00 7,662.33 

General expenses — 

Annuity publicity .. 222.94 

Auditing 120.00 

Fidelity bonds 27.50 

Information service. 122.95 

Legal services 53.20 

Miscellaneous 21.54 

Rental safety box.. 30.00 

Office rent 143.50 

Office equipment ... 42.50 

Office stationery and 

supplies 124.88 

Postage and mailing 122.96 

Recording fees 13.20 

Salaries and office 

help 3,515.15 

Telephone and tele- 
graph 52.68 

Traveling expense . 244.84 4,857.84 

Total expenditures ... 66,727.01 

Net receipts to Mis- 
sion Building and 
Contingent Reserve 
(Schedule 18) 20,217.30 $86,944.31 



Credited for— 
Expenditures on field 



6,081.46 



20. 



Balance March 
No Receipts — 
Expenditures — 
India Land Invest 
ment Fund 



Reserve for Mission Advances 

1929 $ 62,770.73 



346.80 



Balance February 28, 
1930 



$ 62,423.93 



21. Advances to Field Treasurers 



India Treasurer — 

Balance on field 
March 1, 1929 .... 
Charged for — 

Drafts paid $100,000.00 

Advices sent 11,731.44 

Other Transfers ... 1,543.61 



Credited for — 
Expenditures on field 

Balance on field, Feb- 

28, 1930 

China Treasurer — 

Balance on field March 
1, 1929 

Charged for — 

Drafts paid 33,000.00 

Advices sent 6,563.17 

Other transfers 2,399.80 



Credited for — 
Expenditures on field 

Balance on field, Feb- 
ruary 28, 1930 

Sweden Treasurer — 

Balance on field 

March 1, 1929 

Charged for — 

Draft remittances 6,696.45 

Advices sent 47.38 

Other transfers .... 1,121.84 



$ 30,945.95 

113,275.05 
144,221.00 
119,143.17 



18,682.53 



41,962.97 
60,645.50 
44,430.41 



$ 25,077.83 



16,215.09 



1,562.27 



7,865.67 
9,427.94 



Balance on field, Feb. 






ruary 28, 1930 






Denmark Treasurer — 






Balance on field 






March 1, 1929 




167.01 


Charged for — 






Draft remittances .. 


133.25 




Other transfers 


31.53 


164.78 



3,346.48 



Credited for— 
Expenditures on field 

Balance on field, Feb. 

ruary 28, 1930 

Africa Treasurer 

Balance on field, 

March 1, 1929 

Charged for — 
Funds transferred .. 12,867.83 

Advices sent 10,726.17 

Other transfers 583.15 



331.79 
175.20 



18,544.09 



24,177.15 



156.59 





42,721.24 




Credited for — 






Expenditures on field 


28,550.68 




Balance on field, Feb. 






ruary 28, 1930 




14,170.56 


Greene County, Virginia, 






Mission Treasurer — 






Balance on field 






March 1, 1929 


308.04 




Charged for — 






Advances by check 


9,500.00 






9,808.04 




Credited for — 






Expenditures on field 


8,749.14 




Balance on field Feb- 






ruary 28, 1930 




1,058.90 



Total Advances to 
Field Treasurers . . . 



22. Transmission Certificates 



Balance 


outstanding 






March 1 


1929 






Numbered- 








112322 .. 


.$ 22.50 


116181 .. 


..$ 10.00 


112418 ... 


. 41.00 


116181 .. 


.. 200.00 


112464 ... 


. 17.00 


116363 .. 


.. 25.00 


J248 .. 


. 19.94 


116444 .. 


.. 20.00 


J248 .. 


. 34.78 


116556 .. 


.. 10.00 


112875 ... 


. 23.00 


116611 .. 


.. 100.00 


112850 ... 


. 4.05 


116585 .. 


.. 20.00 


J251 ... 


. 40.00 


J264 .. 


.. 6.00 


J251 .. 


. 8.73 


116715 .. 


. . 10.00 


J251 .. 


. 10.39 


116760 .. 


. . 34.40 


J251 .. 


. 5.51 


116786 .. 


. . 10.00 


114032 ... 


. 40.00 


117190 .. 


.. 250.00 


114075 ... 


. 20.00 


117196 .. 


. . 20.25 


114182 ... 


. 257.50 


117277 .. 


.. 23.40 


114290 ... 


. 25.00 


117277 .. 


. . 7.80 


114713 ... 


. 97.00 


117277 .. 


. . 7.80 


114852 ... 


. 10.00 


117277 .. 


.. 7.80 


115230 ... 


. 20.00 


117456 .. 


.. 4.00 


115243 ... 


. 25.00 


117715 .. 


.. 25.00 


115516 ... 


. 10.00 


J267 .. 


. . 50.00 


115516 ... 


. 10.00 


J267 .. 


. . 50.00 


115516 ... 


. 10.00 


J267 .. 


. . 50.00 


115516 ... 


. 10.00 


J267 .. 


. . 50.00 


115500 ... 


. 17.38 


118984 .. 


.. 50.00 


J258 .. 


. 5.55 


118984 .. 


.. 5.00 


J258 ... 


. 10.30 


118984 .. 


.. 35.00 


J260 .. 


. 29.39 


120077 .. 


.. 301.75 


116031 ... 


. 55.00 


120176 .. 


.. 15.00 


116049 ... 


. 50.00 


J270 .. 


.. 2.75 


116057 ... 


. 10.30 


J270 .. 


.. 34.78 


116118 ... 


. 20.00 


J270 .. 


.. 57.12 


116124 ... 


. 5.00 


J272 .. 


.. 169.34 


116142 . . 


. 5.00 







60,025.45 



877.50 



248 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



Total receipts for 
which certificates 
Nos. 2641-2705 were 
issued 



Expenditures — 

Certificates redeemed 

Balance outstanding 
February 28, 1930... 



' 2,631.51 
3,509.01 
1,641.07 

$ 1,867.94 



Balance March 1, 1929 
Receipts — 

Money borrowed . . . 



Expenditures — 

Notes paid off 



23. Notes Payable 

$ 15,454.90 
33,710.46 
49,165.36 
31,138.00 



Balance February 
1930 



18,027.36 



24. Bequests and Lapsed Annuities 

Receipts — 

From bequests — 

Numbered — 

112369 M. B. & C. R...$ 50.00 

112517 India 100.72 

112517 Africa 100.73 

112942 M. B. & C. R... 787.50 

112993 M. B. & C. R... 250.00 

113286 Gospel Mes 935.73 

114873 M. B. & C. R... 656.67 

114881 M. B. & C. R... 180.00 

115774 M. B. & C. R... 467.30 

116557 World Wide End. 500.00 

119456 M. B. & C. R... 10.05 

119852 M. B. & C. R... 246.60 

120015 World Wide End. 400.00 

120395 M. B. & C. R... 465.00 $ 5,150.30 

From lapsed annuities 
(Schedule 12) 

For M. B. & C. R. 7,293.41 
For Foreign Missions 4,000.00 
For Home Missions.. 4,000.00 
For Ministerial and 
Missionary Relief.. 2,500.00 17,793.41 

Total receipts $ 22,943.71 

Expenditures — 

Transfers to — 

India Mission Fund 
(Schedule 1) 100.72 

Africa Mission Fund 

(Schedule 5) 100.73 

Gospel Messenger 
End. (Schedule 10) 935.73 

World Wide Endow- 
ment (Schedule 9) 900.00 

Mission Building and 
Contingent Reserve 
(Schedule 18) 10,200.10 



Probate Papers 20.55 

Legal Services 85.00 

Taxes on estates... 100.88 10,406.53 

World Wide Mission 
Fund 4,000.00 

Home Mission Fund 

(Schedule 6) 4,000.00 

Ministerial & Mis- 
sionary Relief Fund 
(Schedule 13) 2,500.00 

Total expenditures ... $ 22,943.71 

25. Brethren Publishing House 
Receipts — 

1928-1929 earnings 
turned over $10,000.00 

Income — Gospel Mes- 
senger endowment 
(Schedule 19) 1,045.84 

Office rent charged 
to departments 
(Schedules 6, 7, 8, 
14 and 19) 1,080.00 

Gish Testament sales 252.13 

Total receipts $ 12,377.97 

Expenditures — 

(Transfers) 
20% of earnings to 

Ministerial and 

Missionary Relief 

(Schedule 13) 2,000.00 

80% of earnings to 

M. B. & C. R. 

(Schedule 18) 8,000.00 

Gospel Messenger 

endowment interest 

paid over 1,045.84 

Office rental paid 

over 1,080.00 

Gish Testament Fund 

Credit (Schedule 

14) 252.13 

Total transfers $12,377.97 

26. Reserve for Investment Losses 

Balance March 1, 1929 $ 52,876.88 

Receipts — None 
Expenditures- 
Charged off losses 
on six farm loans 9,361.45 

Balance March 28, 1930 $ 43,515.43 

27. Memo, of World Wide Mission 

Donations 

Designated for— 

World Wide Missions $111,423.12 

Women's Deficit Fund 11,391.72 

B. Y. P. D. 1929 305.14 

S. F. F. 1928-1929 68.65 

Challenge Fund 17,592.58 

Total $140,781.21 



Statement of Gish Publishing Fund for Year Ending Feb. 28, 1930 

Invty. Sold to 

No. 3-1-29 Bought B. P. H. Min. 2-28-30 

11 Bible Doctrine 12 50 39 23 

23 Cruden's Concordance 45 1 44 

26 Bible Atlas 22 25 1 23 23 

31 Twelve Apostles 158 1 34 123 

33 Sick, Dying, Dead 136 6 42 88 

36 Universalism Against Itself 203 12 191 

37 Problems of Pulpit and Platform 76 28 48 

68 Archaeology and the Bible 7 25 20 12 

86 A History of the Christian Church 2 50 40 12 

92 Greatness and Simplicity of the Christian Faith ... 49 1 48 



J™ o e The Missionary Visitor 249 

93 Essentials of Evangelism 21 

93AA Man and His Money 5 

95 Parish Evangelism 31 

97 The Heart of the Old Testament 5 

101 The Christian and His Money Problems 2 

102 Pastor's Manual 362 

107 Report of Washington Missionary Conference .... 6 

108 The One Volume Bible Commentary 34 

111 Visitation Evangelism 27 

116 The Local Church 17 

120 A Christian Program for the Rural Community . . 2 

121 The Clash of Color 31 

122 Educational Blue Book and Directory of the 
Church of the Brethren 1 

124 How Jesus Won Men 17 

125 The Christian Doctrine of Peace 44 

126 The Church and Missions 43 

127 The Virgin Birth 35 

128 The Church's Program for Young People 

129 The English of the Pulpit 35 

130 What to Preach 

131 The Christ of the Indian Road 

132 The Portion of the Children 9 

133 Qualifying Men for Church Work 39 

134 Dramas of the Bible 86 

136 History of the Christian Church 126 

137 New Studies in Mystical Religion 97 

138 The Making of the Minister 103 

139 Every Minister His Own Evangelist Ill 

140 The Man of Sorrows 93 

141 Ministerial Ethics and Etiquette 146 

142 Pulpit Mirrors 110 

143 The Desire of All Nations 50 

144 The Potency of Prayer 106 

145 Five World Problems , 95 

146 Christ and Money 103 

147 The Lord's Prayer 

148 Not Slothful in Business 

149 The Madness of War 

150 The Building of the Church 

151 The Changing Family 

40 History of the Christian Church Vol. II 

152 Doran's Ministers' Manual (1930) 

153 Modern Evangelism 

154 Them He Also Called 

155 Voices of the Great Creator 

157 Between War and Peace 

158 Preaching With Authority 

2702 3850 18 4819 1715 

Statement of the Fund 

By Balance on hand March 1, 1929 

Sales, 4819 Books to Ministers $1,973.28 

Sales, 18 Books to B. P. H. at cost 17.82 





4 


17 

5 




3 


28 

5 
2 




147 


215 




1 


5 


100 


4 95 


35 




9 


18 




2 


15 




1 


1 




3 


28 




1 






17 






39 


5 




38 


5 




35 




50 


1 49 
35 




50 


50 




60 


60 




35 


44 
38 






79 


7 




113 


13 




93 


4 




103 






105 


6 


25 


109 


9 




120 


26 




110 


10 


120 


2 158 


10 




99 


7 


25 


114 
103 


6 


500- 


418 


82 


250 


216 


34 


250 


232 


18 


250 


220 


30 


250 


239 


11 


150 


135 


15 


360 


1 359 




250 


237 


13 


275 


255 


20 


250 


248 


2 


200 




200 


250 




250 




Income Gish Estate Endowment v 

To Cost of 3850 Books bought 3,534.31 

Postage and Packing on same 642.35 

Printing List of Books 16.87 

Manuscript Bought 90.00 4,283.53 



Balance on hand February 28, 1930 $4,560.24 



250 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 

1930 



China Mission Territory 

MARY SCHAEFFER 

In China it is hard to get very accurate 
figures on area or population. Therefore, all 
we give here at best is only an approximate 
estimate, even though we tried to get official 
figures whenever we could. 



ChlNA 

membership^ 

1 MCREASt 


###:* 


>$> 


1300- 
1200- 

itoo - 

iMn- 


















i 
/ 


t 






> 


/ 

/ 






i 
/ 

/ 

/ 


i* 






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900- 




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" 





The China mission territory is located in 
the east central section of the province of 
Shansi. It is about 150 miles long, and 75 
miles wide, with an approximate area of 7,- 
500 square miles, and a total population of 
1,306,355, exclusive of Taiyuanfu. 

The territory is divided into three regions : 
Ping Ting, Liao Chou, and Shou Yang. The 
Ping Ting region consists of two counties: 
Leping with a population of 140,000 and Ping 
Ting 315,000; making a total of 455,000. The 
Liao region consists of five counties : Liao 
with a population of 80,601, He Shun 72,638, 
Yu She 57,319, Wu Hsiang 143,760, Chin Chou 
115,041; making a total of 469,359. The Shou 

China Mission Statistics 





TABLE NO 


1. FOREIGN STAFF 




T3 
















<u 
















H3 
















£ 












to 
















u 




o 

to 

«3 






c 




a 

3 


o 


to 

a 

o 




G 

a 


V 

B 




o 


a 


rt 






T3 


"3 




'C 


H 


c 










to 








ft 


1 


c3 

u 

o 


o 
P 


> 

s 


a 
p 


o 




19081 *34 


10 




10 


12 






*38 


11 


3 


14 


10 







* 2 of this number on furlough. 

* 19 of this number on furlough. 
1929 figures in bold face type. 
1925 figures in light face type. 



TABLE II. THE CHURCH IN THE FIELD 





Native 


The Church 




to 


.3 
o 














rs 

bo 


rt 








c 
.2 


u 

3 












03 

<U 


tu 
« 

bo 
^3. 


.4 


'3 

3 " 


a 


to 
U 

bo 

.2 


73 

.3 

u 




a 

3 

Ph 

T) 

G 


.3 
U 

u 


Mission Station 






c 




tH 


rt 


bO 


a 


,3 
to 


> 




to 




U* (0 

U 






c 


£ 




x: 




u 


a 








*o 




v! 


J 


"rt 


'3 


*0 

u 

S 

"8 

O 




U 

cu 

N 

'3 

rt 
hfi 


rt > 


s 

Q 

13 
N 


o 
U 

c 
.2 


a 

"rt 


in 

c 
.2 


Pti 

tn 1-. 

U lO 


o 
.3 
o 
to 

>> 

rt 
13 
G 


rt 

H 

CO 


CO 

• 2Q 
3 1 

!•* 










£ 






a 


M 


o 


ja 




3 






H 


o 


P 


O 


O 


pq 


u 


H 


O 


O 


Cfi 


CO 




17 


1 


9 


7 


1 


6 


35 




704 






1 


|240 1224.13 

1 320| 168. 64 




17 


1 


9 


7 


1 


5 


37 




560 


400 


100 


1 




15 

15 


1 9 
1 8 


6 

7 


1 
1 


16 

4 


10 

18 




300 

185 




50 


1 

1 


187 1 81.20 




265 1 34.17 




g 




6 


? 


1 


6 


1 




169 






1 


120|114.25 

176] 66.21 




9 




6 


3 


1 


5 


38 




140 


80 


70 


2 




"\ 




? 


1 


1 




7 




82 








| 


66.66 




2 




1 


1 


1 


1 


23 












1 




Totals 


41 


1 


?6 


16 


4 


78 


53 




1,255 

885 




220 


3 


547)486.24 

761|269.02 




43 


] 


24 


18 


4 


15 


116 




480 




4 



1929 figures in bold face type. 
1925 figures in light face type. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



251 



Yang region consists of two counties : Shou 
Yang with a population of 182,968, and Yu, 
199,028, making a total of 381,999. Taiyuanfu 
is the capital of the province. It is quite a 
large city, with several missions working 



there. Our mission works a section but has 
no definite population assigned to it. 

The country is very mountainous and the 
villages in some of the counties are small be- 
cause the farming land on which they de- 




/ \-MATlEN 



33: 



^ 






i 



^ — : 



CHIN CIKXT7 



^ 



7> 



<r 



<0*^*?t> 



3 

> 

^ MISSION PlErLD 

cnuRcn-orTrtE-BRemRtN 

LTLTLT-OLD CHINESE; WALL 

COUNTY 5«VT; BOUNDaRY 

. MOTOR ROflP; f iiiii u RfllLPOeP 

this neiP coveR5 e» territory 75 miles 

WIDE" BY 150 MILLS LONG. THE WHlTEr 

SeCTIONS SHOW WHERe CHRISTIAN INPLU- 
ENC& MAS B&fN Gffef>-re3T. 



252 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



pend for a living is scarce and not very good. 
In some sections the water is scarce and all 
the water available is that which is gathered 
into large pools during the summer rains. 
They have not been able to find water even 
though they have dug wells. They do not 
have machinery to drill deep wells. Then at 
other places there are many springs and 
small rivers, making the surrounding land 
very fertile. 

There are some coal mines and small iron 
works, giving employment to some of the 
people, and the Shansi merchants are scat- 



tered over all of China. But the most of the 
people are farmers. They rise early and work 
until late, though not so intensely as Ameri- 
cans. They turn the barren mountains into 
grain-producing terraces. No land is wasted 
that can be made to produce. When the 
rainfall is sufficient a living can be made 
from the land; when not sufficient it means 
suffering for many. 

The graph will show that not a great pro- 
portion of the population have become Chris- 
tians ; there is still much to do. While 
growth in numbers does not seem so large, 



TABLE III. GENERAL EDUCATION 





i 

o 

o 
3 

S-H 

3 

CO 

|o 

r3 

Z< 
H 


Kinder- 
garten 


Elementary 
Schools 


Middle 
Schools 


Bible School 




Mission Station 


co 
S3 
u 

u 

ri 

bo 
<u 
3 

M 


CO 

■ft 

3 


to 

"o 

o 
,3 
o 


to 

"E 

3 
Ph 

ri 
o 
H 


in 

o 

PQ 


u 

O 


09 

3 
o 
,3 
o 
w 


CO 

'» 

3 

Ph 

"ri 
O 


in 
>. 
O 

pq 


en 
6 


"o 

o 
.3 

u 

en 


to 

3 

73 

3 

ri 
O 

H 


en 

*rt 


CO 

U 

co 

s 


co 

"o 

P 
1 

CO 
_> 

"C 
o 
m 

u 

<u 
h 


Pin^ Tine 


354 

407 


1 

1 


10 

20 


4 

9 


198 

387 


121 

272 


77 

115 


1 


110 


90 


20 


1 
1 


36 




.36 $1,427.94 






204 

26S 


1 

1 


10 

46 


2 

3 


169 

189 


106 

129 


631 

60 1 1 


34 


34 




1| 25 

11 




25| 
1 






86 

138 


1 


8 


2 

3 


78] 52 | 26 
118|118| 


1 


20 


20 










161.11 






Totals 


644 

814 


3 2S 


8 

15 


445J279 lfifi 


1 no > 


20 


2 61 


61 


1,589.05 




2 


66 


694 1 


519| 


175 


2 


54| 


54 


2 


1 





1929 figures in bold face type. 
1925 figures in light face type. 



TABLE IV. MEDICAL 





For. 

Staff 


Native Staff 


Hospital and 


Dispensary 












3 


3 
cu 

6 

o 










ri 










CO 




co 

.2 

"3 












3 


£ 










en 

3 










.(U 




P 
1 


Mission Station 


s 




3 


3 

s 


CO 

C 


en 
3 




bo 

3 






3 


en 




en 


to 


Pi 


to 










<u 




ri 






O 


















3 


& 




3 




3 


£ 


.a 


en 
'to 




bo 






•5 


03 

u 


£ 




cO 


-3 


tu 

s 


CO 




oj 




en 




en 

< 


< 




o 


eo 

3 

.Si 


.a 


en 


ri 


K 


cu 

a 


CD 






CD 




.2 


to 


.2 


rt 


^s 


TJ 


"ri 


3 


n 




X 


o 


O 


O 


3 


H 


"ri 




co 

,3 


to 

3 




en 
^> 

.3 


g 

'5 


3 
'ri 


'a 
o 


CO 


US 

Pm 


en 


ri 

(L> 


<v 
m 

,0 


en 
09 


o 

'co 


o 


"ri 
o 


"ri 
O 


-5 

u 




Oh 


fc 


Om 


PM 


H 


H 


w 


pq 







H 


o 


> 


^ 


§ 


H 


H 


§ 






1 


? 


| 1 


1 


1 


75 


675 


1 


2,518 


821 611146 




3 193 


9,264 1 7,305.24 




1 


2 


3 


1 1 




1 


75 


666 


1 


1,902] 40| 83|145 




2,568 


9,198| 6,030.45 




1 2 


1 




1 




1 


70 


376 


1 


2,965 


17| 50|123l 
11 1 30|H9| 


1 445 


3,015 3,421.00 




1 1 1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


60 


434 


1 


2,143 


1,194 


3,337| 1,298.93 


Showyang 


: 


1 




2 


1 


1 


40 


185 


1 


3,270 


46| 60 


30 




1,493 


3,579| 2,844.30 






1 




1 




1 


30 


135 


1 


2,814 


10 1 30 


50 




837 


2,814] 1,114.96 


Totals 




3 


/l 




/I 


? 


1 


185 


1,186 


3 


8,753 


145|171 

61 1 143 


?<W 




6,131 

4,599 


15,858 1 13 570.54 

15,3491, 8,444.34 




2 


3 


5 




3 


1 


3 


165 


1,235 


3 


6,859 


314 





1929 figures in bold face type. 
1925 figures in light face type. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



253 



OURCMINPi HELD 




ONCOUT Or 1110 A CHRISTIAN 



the people entering the church do so because 
they really want to be saved. Results of 
seed-growing cannot be measured by graph. 
Many people listen eagerly to the gospel 
story and try to live Christian principles even 
though they are not yet ready to face the 
stigma or the persecution that sometimes 
comes when they enter the church. Many 
prejudices and misunderstandings are re- 
(Continued on Page 269) 

Inventory of China Mission 
Property, 1930 

Values given in Chinese currency, Mex. 
dollar worth 50c. The total valuation in 
China is $147,000. Mou is a unit of space, 
about one-fifth of an acre. 

PING TING CHOW 
Classification with size, and date of construction or 
purchase of building, indicated: 

Present 
Value 
Reading Room, small Chinese court. (First 
possession at Ping Ting Chow, which 
served both as home for Crumpackers and 

chapel), 1910 $ 500.00 

Chinese Pastor and Others, 1 large and 6 
smaller courts, 1912-13 with 1 court added 

1919 3,000.00 

Boys' School, 12 mou, 1913, additions '16, '22, 

'26 13.000.00 

Girls' School, iy 2 mou, 1915, additions 1918.. 8,000.00 

Woman's Bible School, 3 l / 2 mou, 1918 3,500.00 

Hospital with Equip., X-Ray and Furnace, 

15 mou, '16, '18, '20, '22 4,500.00 

Church with rooms for men attending class- 
es, 6 mou, 1915, 1918 8,000.00 

Electric Light Plant, building, machinery 

cables and meters, 1921-1922 7,000.00 

Residence No. 1 (Ladies), 6 mou, 1915 5,000.00 

Residence No. 2, iy 2 mou, 1918 5,700.00 

Residence No. 3 (Nurses' Home), 3 l / 2 mou, 

1920 6.000 00 

Residence No. 4 (J. H. Bright), 3V 2 mou, 1920 6,000.00 
Residence No. 5 (F. H. Crumpacker), 6 mou, 

1922 6,400.00 

Residence No. ^ (B. M. Flory), 6 mou, 1922.. 6,400.00 



Land East of City, 38 mou, 1922 2,200.00 

Cemetery, 1 mou, 1913 400.00 

Auto and Garage, 1 mou, 1922 1,000.00 

Total $127,100.00 

LIAO CHOW 

Classification with size, and date of construction or 

purchase of building, indicated: 

Present 
Value 

Boys' School, 10 mou, '15-'16, '18, '21, '25. ...$ 20,000.00 

Girls' School, 10 mou, 1915, 1925 16,000.00 

(The schools exchanged places in 1925.) 

Woman's Bible School. (This property is ad- 
jacent to Girls' School, most of which had 
formerly been part of original Boys' 
School.) 4 mou, 1915, '18. '25, '29 3,000.00 

Hospital with Equip., X-Ray and Furnace. 
12 mou, 1915, '16, '18, '21, '24 31,500.00 

Church with Reading Room, 5 mou, 1916, 
'20, '21, '22-23 18,000.00 

Chinese Pastor and Others, 2 mou, 1914, 1915, 

1920 900.00 

Residence No. 1 (I. E. Oberholtzer), 7 mou, 

1918, 1921, 1928 ' 6,500.00 

Residence No. 2 (E. M. Wampler), 7 mou, 

1921 6,000.00 

Residence No. 3 (Nurse and Lady Worker), 

5 mou, 1921 5,750.00 

Cnimproved Property in City, 8 mou, 1923, 

1926 600.00 

Cemetery, 6 mou, 1914 350.00 

Autos and Garage (New Ford 1929), 1921, 

1928, 1929 3,200.00 

Total $111,800.00 

The Sollenbergers are living in rented quarters 
which have been used since 1912. During this time it 
has been the home of the Brights, Seeses, and Ober- 
holtzers. Chinese workers have also occupied this 
court. Another court, also Chinese style, adjoining 
the Girls' School, is the home of Laura Shock and 
Anna Hutchison. This court has been rented since 
1913, and was used first by the Boys' School, after 
which it became the home of R. C. Flory's and then 
Samuel Bowman's, when in 1925 it became a Ladies' 
Home. 

SHOW YANG 
Classification with size, and date of construction or 
purchase of building, indicated: 

Present 
Value 
Large Residence (Ladies) (Pre-Boxer, 
bought of English Baptist Mission), 4 mou, 

1919, 1922 $11,000.00 

Boys' School, 24 mou, 1920-21, 1922 26,000.00 

Girls' School (Part of Property bought of 

E. M. Mission), 6 mou, 1919, 1922 3,500.00 

Woman's Work Quarters (part of property 
procured of E. B. M.), 1 mou, 1919 1,000.00 

Chapel (Chinese Store Buildings adapted and 
quarters for workers), 4 mou, 1919, 1921... 2,800.00 

Hospital (Chinese Style Courts with homes 
for two doctors), 4 mou, 1924, 1926, 1927... 5,000.00 

Residence (semi-foreign) (W. J. Heisey), 2 
mou, 1919, 1920-21 2,000.00 

Residence (2 Chinese Courts) (So. Com- 
pound) (W. Harlan Smith), 8 mou, 1920- 
21, 1922_ 2,200.00 

East Portion of South Compound (gardening 

for Missionaries), 19 mou, 1920-21 1,500.00 

Total $ 55,000.00 

J. Homer Bright, 
Mission Treasurer. 
TAI YUAN FU 

The station was opened in 1921. Our missionaries 
living in Taiyuan are in rented quarters. Since their 
return to China last fall, the Myerses are living in a 
foreign house rented from the English Baptist Mis- 
sion. The Ikenberrys are in newly built Chinese 
quarters. The court space is small— too small for 
growing children. Some brick beds were removed 
and wooden floors put in a couple of the main rooms. 
Another location is rented for a chapel and Chinese 
workers. 



254 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



India Mission Statistics 



TABLE I. FOREIGN STAFF 



TABLE VI. HIGHER EDUCATION 



1894 



*12 of this number on furlough. 
*14 of this number on furlough. 
1929 statistics in bold face type. 
1925 statistics in light face type. 



J4 












en 




u 




























^ 


CO 


£ 












o 


3 
O 






a 






u 


£ 


rt 


V 

Q 


o 


3 

73 
u 
3 

'rt 
T3 

In 

o 


.S 

"c3 

O 

c 

p 


CD 
> 

5 


T3 

"C 
rt 

H 
c 


g 

In 

oj 
Eh 

u 
o 

.3 

co 


CO 

1! 
C 

u 


1894 


*53 


12 


4 


17 


| 20 




9 



| *61 I 18 I 3 I 20 I 20 I 





Bible Training Schools 


Station or District 


s 
o 

3 

en 
3, 


3 
<u 

3 

CO 

*rt 
o 
H 


s 


s 
u 


Bulsar (Gujarati) . . 

Vada (Marathi) 

Totals 


1 
1 

2 


18 
18 
36 


11 

9 
20 


7 
9 
16 



TABLE II. THE CHURCH IN THE FIELD 





Nat. Staff 


The Church 














3 










3 






.3 














bo 






























u 
















u 














« 










3 




ft 


3 














bfl 


U ■ 

rt 


>> 




m 


■£ 




3 
Ah 


,3 












m 


3 


<u 






ft 








CJ 


Mission Stations 






s 
u 




,3 
o 


> 

rt 

M 


bJO 

a 


3 

S 


IS 




U 




H3 

3 

rt 


u 
O eo 




"d 


s 

<u 

3 
T) 


t3 

<u 
3 
"rt 

o 


3 


U 

id 

"3 

rt 
to 


el 

rt > 

S fe 
CO 

s-c 

OJ Ih 

.3 a 


u 

s 

p 

N 

ft 


s' 
o 
U 

s 

rt 
vi 


19 
JO 

s 

"rt 


3 

rt 

'u 


u 

73 

P. 2 


Efl 

o 
o 

u 
to 

rt 

-a 
3 


u 

<U 

.3 
o 
rt 

CO 


a 
to — 

5 o 
.2Q 

|i 

is ° 

1* 




o 






£ 


Ih 




rt 


.3 


o 


JS 




3 






H 


o 


P 


q 


O 


pq 


u 


H 


u 


o 


co 


CO 


u 




1 H 

| 23 




12 

14 


2 

9 


i 
i 


S 

7 


18 

10 


412 

297 


188 

193 


27 

12 


120 


6 

8 


260 

392 


86 




68 



Amletha | 6| | 5| 1| 1| 2| | 150| 61 1 61 1 90| 3| 186| 140 



Andada \ 


3 


1 


2 




1 


2 


8 


150 


58 




200 


2 


55 


56 


Anklesvar 


19 

46 


2 

1 


12 

23 


5 

22 


1 


12 

17 


46 

27 


1,200 

1,100 


840 

875 


650 

550 


100 

127 


13 

19 


450 

547 


218 

302 


Bulsar 


16 

34 


1 

2 


12 

23 


3 

9 


1 

1 


2 

3 


22 

55 


500 

450 


171 

276 


2 

12 


150 

300 


3 

3 


264| 350 

475 1 189 




14 

8 


11 S| 8 

1| 4| 3 


i 


4 


8 

7 


120 

176 


59 

58 


6 

150 


55 

22 


2 

5 


1161 110 

176| 53 






23 

22 


2| 13 

2| 11 


8 
9 


1 
1 


2| 16[ 420 

2| 26| 480 


236 

168 


220 

127 


600 

353 


10 

4 


435 | 310 

3001 130 




Jamoli 


4 


1 4| 


1 


3| 16| 160| 64| 64 1 42| 3\ 100| 78 


Jitali 


2 


11 11 


1 


21 | 250) 106| 3\ 3001 2| 40 1 67 


Khergam 


30 


1 26| 3 


1 


1| 19| 323| 134| 77 1 698| 2| 237| 168 


Palghar 


10 

8 


1 

1 


V 


1 

1 


U 


90 

90 


52 

37 


8 


40 


2 
1 


105 1 20 
90) 




Rohid 


2 


11 1| 


1 


2\ 15| 100| 66 1 42) 100| 3\ 58| 16 


Umalla- Vali 


13 

27 


11 10| 2 

1 19| 8 


1 

2 


4j 111 5001 278| 278| 130 
2| 39) 869] 361 1 233 1 


5 

10 


3221 260 
343| 272 




Vada 


12| 


5 

6 


4 
6 


1 
1 


1 


3| 62| 41 1 17[ 751 2 
5| 85) 43 | 8| | 1 


701 90 

50| 


Vyara 


58 

61 


3 

1 


401 15 

42j 18 


1 
1 


22 

25 


21 

94 


2,300 

2,150 


1, 590 1 1,340 
1,394(1,250 


300 

75 


22 

26 


710 

940 


275 

337 


Totals 


223 

241 


15 

8 


156 

149 


52 

84 


151 60 

10| 60 


203 

284 


6,737 

5,697 


3,944 

3,405 


2,789 

2,342 


3,000 

877 


80 

77 


3,408 ?-7dd 




3,313 


1,351 



1925 statistics in light face type. 
1929 statistics in bold face type. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



255 



TABLE III. GENERAL EDUCATION 





s 
o 


Kin. 


Elementary- 


High & Mid. 


Industrial 


Tch. Train. 


1 




o 


Schools 


Schools 


Schools 


School 


"3 


Mission Stations 


u 
m 

a 

rH in 

■§•8 


CO 

a 

V 

n 
be 




03 


'3. 

3 
Pi 






(A 


'B 

3 






| 

s 


J2 

Pi 

S3 






pi 



3 


co 

a 
u 

w 




u 


13 
< 

co 
OJ 




o 1 




(3, 

3 


O 

C 


o 


CO 

>» 

O 


00 

■- 


o 


"3 


OS 




go 


ca 


73 
o 


o 


OB 


r. 


O 


5 


Ed 


So 3 




H 


^ 


- 


f. 


H 


O 


O 


■f. 


H 


PQ 


'J 


— 


- 


pq 





— 


H 


^ 


to 


to 




| 226 

| 257 


1 


12 


8 

8 


199 

244 


178 

165 


21 

79 


1 
1 


2 

13 


2 

11 


2 


1 

1 


13 

10 


13| 

10| 














1 518| 
1 436| 




14 

19 


398 

287 


311 

186 


87 

101 


2 

2 


89 

88 


38 

29 


51 

59 


1 
1 


31[ 22| 9 

S| 5| 


1 


61 


| 




61 1 | 6 


Bulsar 


1,169 






?A 


1,042 


735 30; 


3 


57 


55 


2 


4 


70 1 70 














642 


1 


45 


12 


587 


561 


26 


1 10 


10 




1 


44 1 44 














120 

225 


1 


20 


5 

9 


85 

216 


55 

189 


30 

27 


1! 15 

l| 9 




15 

9 






















Jalalpor 


436 






11 


395 


266 129 


2 


41 1 29 12 
















14 




487 






16 


460 


363 


97 


3 


27j 15| 12 












! 




32 


Palghar 


| 119 

| 85 






4 

1 


61 

85 


61 

85 




1 


28 


27 


1 


1 


30 30 
1 1 




1 




Umalla-Vali 


341 






10 


299| 277| 22 


2| 42| 38 4 












247 


7 


86 


7 


138| 121 18| 


2| 23 | 23 | 


1 






1 9 


Vada 


| 65 

| 94 


1 

1 


11 

13 


5 

8 


65 

81 


64 

71 


1 

10 




















1 


3 


Vyara 


| 472 






22 


400 


320 


80 


2| 37 


28 


9 


1 35 35 






1 




| 675 






34 


635 


476 


159 


2| 40 


31 


9 


1|120|120 






1 1 1 


Totals 


3.4% 3 


43 


107 


2,944 2,267 677 


14|311 


217 


94 


8|179|170| 9| 


1 




14 




13,1481 9 


144 


114 


2,733|2,217|517 


12)210 


119 


91 


4|179|179| ! 1 


61 1 61 




50 



1929 statistics in bold face type. 
1925 statistics in light face type. 



TABLE IV. MEDICAL 





Foreign 
Staff 


Native Staff 


Hospitals and Dispensaries 


Mission Stations 


a 

i 

00 

s 
.2 
jo 

CO 

J3 

to 


c 

U 

E 
o 

1 

C 

eg 

u 

>. 


V] 

m 
5 
2 


3 

<L) 
1 

1X1 

C 

.3 

'o 
'7. 
>t 

- 


a 

V 

S 

o 

1 

en 

c 
'J/J 
to 


p 

BO 



Ed 

/- 
DO 

CO 

< 

u 

'rt 
H 


Z 

s 

o 

1 

co 

(CJ 
V) 

'« 

to 

< 

•3 
0) 

H 


co 
"cd 

'S 

o 

x 


bo 
B 

a 

<u 
u 
O 
to 

_c 

co 
OJ 

pq 


B0 



"cd 

to 

c 


71 

e« 

BO 

<D 
ft 

Q 


CO 

.a 

cd 

s 

<D 

A 

CO 

s 

CO 

a 

I 

Ed 
u 

to 


CO 
V 
in 

cd 

"cd 
o 

CO 




co 
u 

E 

z 

X 

c 

CO 
> 


CO 

Pi 

O 

ca 

V 

a 
C 


id 


co 

C 

.o 
cd 

Ih 

(U 

a 
O 

Ih 

O 

c 

§ 


CO 

to 

"cd 

3 

2 

c 

O 

H 


co 

fl 

<u 

B 

cd 
V 

i- 

H 

O 

H 


CO 
Ih 

jd 
"o 

p 
1 

OJ 

V 
V 

to 
y 

t3 

u 




1 
1 


















1 
1 


No rec. 

2,743 




118 




56 




2,861 










1 

1 


1 

1 


1 

1 


1 
1 




1 

1 


2 

1 


1 
1 


18 
9 


338 

263 


1 


21,372 

23,414 


24 

47 


415 

480 


77 

46 


318| 6,449|21,787| 8,223 




328| 7,561 123,8941 9,943 






2 

1 


2 

1 






1 
1 


4 

1 


1 

1 


191255 

4| 85 


1 
1 


11,732 

6,624 


47 

12 


81 

86 




♦280 

*150 


5,703 

1,891 


11,732 

6,710 


3,058 




816 






I 


1 1 




1 
1 


22,494 

5,072 




99 

136 






16,333,22,494; 102 




2,764| 5,208| 68 


Totals 


1 1 
1 1 


31 3 


11 


2 

2 


61 2 


37 

2 3 


593 

343 


4 
4 


55,598 

37,853 


71 

59 


595 

820 


77 

46 


598128. 


11,383 




2 


2 


1 




2 


2 


534 


[12,216 


38,673 


10,827 



•Includes major operations. 
1929 statistics in bold face type. 
1925 statistics in light face type. 



256 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



TABLE V. PHILANTHROPIC 





Widows' Home 


Baby Home 


G 
cl 

in 

c 
.2 

'oo 

"1 


co 

.2 
s 

c 


o 
H 


u 

S 

o 


IS 
u 


-S3 

■o 

co 


13 
o 


en 
>> 

O 
PP 


o 


Bulsar 


1 

1 


11 

15 


8 

10 


3 

5 




1 
1 





Dahanu | 


1 








1 


20 


7 


13 


Umalla-Vali | 


1 








1 


30 


17 


13 


Totals | 


1) 
if 


11 

15 


8 

10 


3 

5 


1 

1 


20 

30 


7 

17 


13 

13 



1929 statistics in bold face type. 
1925 statistics in light face type. 



Total India Medical Patients 
During 1925-1929 



| 1925| 1926| 1927 | 1928 | 1929 




7,561 5,559 
1,891 3,218 


7,417 
4,268 


6,001 1 6,449 


Dahanu 


8,591 1 5,703 


Total 


9,452|8,777|11,685|14,592|12,152 



T HE IMPIft flELP 

AHWA - 

PWKLfSVAR 




ING BACK THtr DABKNES& 
E-APLANATION M£f 

PROP0BTION Or HELD 5Y5TET1ATIcaLLY WORKED ' 

PARTI ftLLY » * | 

WHERf THE GOSPEL STOOY 15 ONKNOVKN 



Inventory of India Mission Property, 1930 

(Given in Indian currency, the unit of which is the rupee, currently worth 36 cents. 

of property in India is $414,921.96.) 



The total valuation 



Properties 



LAND 

Compounds 

Village Plots 

Farm Lands 

BUILDINGS 

Bungalow No. 1 

Bungalow No. 2 

Bungalow No. 3 

Bungalow No. 4 

Quarters for Hired Help 

Wood House, Godown, etc 

Workers' Quarters 

Boarding School Buildings 

Village School Buildings 

All Other Buildings 

Medical Buildings 

Shop and Industrial Buildings 

Churches (Mission Owned). 

Stables .' 

Garages 

All Other Buildings 

WELLS 

WIND MILLS, Pipes, Tanks, etc.. 
FURNITURE AND EQUIPMENT 

Bungalows 

Medical 

Boarding Schools 

Village Schools 

Churches (Mission Owned) 

Offices 

Shops, Farms and Gardens 

CONVEYANCES 

Carts and Tongas 

Automobiles 

ANIMALS 

Horses 

Oxen 

Cows, Goats, etc 

TOURING OUTFITS 

Tents and Equipment 

MISCELLANEOUS 



30,931 

125 

32,500 

14,000 
12,000 
21,000 
20,856 
3,600| 9,000| 



15,000 
20,000 



200 
5,600 
13,600 

600 
2,000 


800 
28,269 
6,500 

69,500 




63,300 


2,000 

1,200 

600 

3,000 


2,000 

8,400 
1,150 


1,600 
100 

215 
| 130 


2,400 

500 
200 




550 



60,000 
3,500 



8,000 
10,000 
15,000 

4,000 1 

300 

20,000 

21,000 

2,000 

30,000 

900 

15,000 
300 

4,0001 



6,000 
1,300 



18,000 



3,000 
200 
2,500 
17,500 
2,000 
600 
58,500 



3,000 
4,300 
1,500 

12,000 



400 
12,400 
16,800 
3,000 



400 



500 
1,000 
200| | 300| 



110| 400| 



6,000 


1,600 


1,500 


2,500 


3,600| 


1,000 


1,200 


700 


1,000 


1,600 


1,500 


1,450 


1,150 


800 


1,550 


6,500 


4,800 






175 


300 


• 600 


500 


200 


300 


200 


100 
30 


200 




150 
50 


2,400 










250 




20 


400 





100 



200 1 



2,400 

3,200 

17,000 
16,000 
2,000 

2,800 

300' 

6,000 

16,000 

1,550 

500 

100 

2,000' 

1,600 

900 

4,000 
400 

1,800 

100 

400 

50 

50 

200 



| 400| 550j 150| 



,000 



10,000 



2,000 
100 
5,000 
12,000 
2,000 



2,000 
300 



1,100 

350 

6,000 

11,760 
19,600 



5,100 

400 

12,740 

16,660 

2,000 

5,780 

22,500 
4,900 



900 
900 



15,000 
19,000 



5,500 
1,000 
2,500 
47,000 
1,800 
3,000 

1,200 

1,000 



4,000 
1,000 

1,400 

800 
300 



400 



370| 



1,000 






1,800 








1,600 




175 
35 


200 
900 
200 


200 


150 




300 
200 


40 

1,200 

300 


200 


600 


125 


1,250 


300 
300 


575 


290 


200 


1,000 


500 


350 



112,331 
10,475 
46,000 

102,760 
114,600 
38,000 
20,856 
35,000 

3,700 
95,009 
167,060 
11,400 
78,650 
94,780 
67,500 
39,500 
13,000 

3,100 

5,100 
34,600 

8,050 

13,650 
11,675 
3,815 
1,330 
130 
2,400 
1,820 

2,280 
4,400 

240 

3,725 

, 735 

4,465 
425 



TOTALS 



|7O,890|326,931|213,O50|123,805|58,160|47,70O|119,4O5|81,8O0 110,82O|l, 152,561 



Prepared by L. A. Blickenstaff. 



June 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



257 




m** 


if 




E 2 

5 1 


a in 

p 

15 

or r 

o u 












ANK1RVAD 


437 


|(o2 


4-Z 


4 


UMALLA-VAL1 


1.617 


U2 


\Z 


3 


JALAlPOWttWSftftl 


711 


320 


28 


/ 


vre>Rp> 


751 


-HI 


115 


/ 


Ohwa 


13.5U 


142 


Ip 


1 


iULSAR-KHERGAM 


ai3 


3X5 


05 


2 


JAHAn)U 


W3 


238 


10 


1 


^ALGHaR 


4o(o 


IJ7 


4 


/ 


VADA 


2«3 


159 


4 


/ 


TOTALS 


7050 


2132 


254 


15 



■At^G-Wft 



258 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



iNDia 

MtriBtRSHIP 


< 


^#*##^ 


■^QAA- 








y 

s 




oyw 

3800- 

3700- 

3600- 

3560- 

34<W- 




i 


s 


f 






1 
1 










1 

/ 
/ 








/ 


> 








/ 
/ 






Iff 










1 1 





Children Attending Mission 
Schools in India 1925-1929 

ANKLESVAR 

Boys Girls Total 

Practising School 104 

7th Standard 120 ■ 120 

Teacher Training 52 52 

Carpenters not previously- 
counted 15 15 

Village Schools 800 

Girls' Boarding Hostel 189 189 

Day pupils 11 51 62 

Practical Arts 54 54 

AHWA 

Compound School 204 54 258 

Village Schools 245 56 301 

BULSAR 

Boys' Boarding 268 60 328 

Wankel Boys' Boarding 292 6 298 

Village Schools 220 

DAHANU 

Girls' Boarding 24 90 114 

Village Schools 200 2 202 

JALALPOR 

Girls' Boarding 140 

Village Schools 600 150 750 

KHERGAM 

Girls' Boarding 59 101 160 

Village Schools 814 93 907 

PALGHAR 

Boys' Boarding 220 4 224 

Village Schools 80 6 86 

VADA 

*Girls' Boarding 8 16 24 

Hindu Boarding — temporary 31 31 

Pinjarl Boarding 35 1 36 

Day Pupils 18 1 19 

Village Schools 173 15 188 

VALI 

Boys' Boarding Hostel 165 165 

Day pupils 16 16 32 



Village Schools 560 51 611 

VYARA 

Boys' Boarding Hostel 258 258 

Day pupils 42 

Village Schools 1100 200 1300 

Girls' Boarding 14 121 135 

*Girls were moved to Dahanu, June 5, 1927 

Prepared by Lillian Grisso. 

The Africa Mission Field 

H. STOVER KULP 

The field of activity of the Africa mission 
is in the British Protectorate of Nigeria. The 
total area of Nigeria is 360,388 sq. mi. It has 
a population of 18,631,442, or an average 
density of about 50 per sq. mi. The coast 
region differs so much from the interior that 
the British have found it wise to divide Ni- 
geria into two large divisions for administra- 
tive purposes. These are known as Southern 
Nigeria and Northern Nigeria. Southern Ni- 
geria has a population density of 90 to the 
sq. mi. In Northern Nigeria it is 40. 

Our mission is in the eastern part of 
Northern Nigeria. In cooperation with other 
societies at work in this country, guided by 
the principle of mission comity, the area 
chosen for the Church of the Brethren is 
that occupied by the Bura tribe and those 
closely allied to them in language and cus- 
toms. These are the Babur, Chibbuk, and 
Margi tribes. Practically all of this area is 
in the southern part of Bornu province al- 
though a small portion of the territory lies in 
the northern part of Adamawa province. 

All the Baburs, all but a few thousand of 
the Buras and a great many of the Chibbuks, 
are in the Biu Division of Bornu Province. 
This Biu Division would form about the west- 
ern two-thirds of our territory. East of this 
is the land occupied by the Margis. The to- 
tal area is about 6,000 sq. mi. with a popula- 
tion upwards to 200,000. This is an average 
density of 33. The density of Bornu Prov- 
ince is 22.6 while that of Adamawa is 23.4. 
These figures indicate that the density of our 
district is considerably greater than that of 
the surrounding area. 

The territory itself is a strip about 95 miles 
long and 65 miles wide. It lies between 12° E. 
and 13.°30' E. longitude and between 10.°15' 
N. and ll.°30' N. latitude. The western part 
is in the Benue River Basin and is drained 
by the Hawal River. Garkida is on the 
Hawal River. The eastern part is drained 
by the Yedseram River and is a part of the. 






June 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



259 



Chad Basin. Lassa is about a mile from the 
Yedseram. 

The population is entirely rural. The peo- 
ple live in small villages. The larger villages 
have from 40 to 50 compounds. Villages con- 
taining more than 100 compounds are rare. 

The people are farmers. Sorghum vulgare, 
commonly known as guinea corn, is the 
staple food crop. It has a long growing sea- 
son. It is usually planted in May and har- 
vested in November or December. Beans are 
grown with the corn. The people are still 
in the hand-hoe stage of development. All 
the adults, men and women, work on the 
farms. Each household farms but a few 
acres. Okra, roselle, and other relish crops 
are grown by the women. Cotton and pea- 
nuts are the principal crops grown for ex- 
port. Indigo is also grown and is used in the 
local dye pits. Some is also exported to 
other tribes. The Buras have a system of 
currency with cotton as the basis. This in- 
dicates its antiquity in Bura agriculture. 
Spinning, weaving, dyeing, sewing, brass 
moulding, weaving of baskets and grass mats, 
making sandals, carving stools, decorating 
gourds are the principal arts and crafts en- 
gaged in. Practically every household has a 
flock of chickens and a small herd of goats. 
There are also many sheep. The more 
wealthy may possess horses and cattle. 

The people live in compounds of irregular 
jhape. Each compound contains a number 
of small round huts with conical grass roofs. 



The walls of the huts are usually of mud. 
The people sleep on grass mats or skins 
spread out on the floor or on a raised mud 
platform. When additional protection from 
cold is needed at night, as it is about ten 
months of the year, the door is closed tightly 
and a fire is made. As the huts have no other 
opening but the door the stuffy condition of 
the hut can be imagined. 

The position of women varies among the 
different groups. Among the Buras they 
have their own farms and possess a consid- 
erable amount of economic freedom. Polyga- 
my however is universal. Any social system 
legalizing polygamy degrades womanhood 
and practically compels widespread illicit 
sexual relationship. This polygamous system 
with all its ramifications is the greatest bar- 
rier to the acceptance of the Christian mes- 
sage. 

Religiously the people are Animists. But 
here as elsewhere Animism as a religion will 
never be able to withstand the contact with 
other cultures, so that only temporarily will 
it be any great barrier to the advancement 
of Christianity. 

The above mentioned 200,000 people are 
our immediate responsibility. Our present 
plans are for the evangelizing of this group. 
There is in Northern Nigeria an untouched 
field of 6,000,000 or more. These are Mo- 
hammedans. The Government of Nigeria has 
for a number of years prohibited missionary 
work among them. There is every indica- 




260 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



tion that this ban will be removed at an early 
date. Immediately north of our present field 
live 750,000 Kanuri people who belong to this 
group. Surely when the door of opportunity 
is opened to reach these people, we shall not 
be able to deny our part of the responsibility 
to occupy a part if not all this Kanuri area. 

Africa Mission Statistics 

TABLE I. FOREIGN STAFF 



TABLE III. GENERAL EDUCATION 



Date of First Work in Field 











S3 










<u 






c 




P 






<o 










§ 




£ 




a 


13 




-c 




T3 


C 






CO 

1 


"rt 

6 


03 
"P 
O 
S3 
P 


> 


rt 

£ 
P 



1922 



I 181 7| lj 8| 2| 3 



TABLE II. THE CHURCH IN THE FIELD 







bO H 


>, 


■ 


■ 








CD 


S3 






a 










U 

u 
3 


> co 
M' 2 


bo 


$3 


3 


Sg 








j3 

u 


co C 


_G 


S 


.3 


S-t o 


15 


co 


Mission Station 


T3 

<u 

N 

"a 

rt 

bo 

o 




13 

<L> 

N 

ft 


u 
c 

• co 


rt u 


n 

^ S3 

1-3 


J! 
o 
co 

03 
T3 
53 


.2 




o 


m 


U 


H 


o 


tn 


u 



Garkida 
Gardemna 



1| 18| 141 22 52 

I. I. I. I. 8*1 | 



Lassa 


...| 1| 4| 


| 14| 8*| 


7\ 


|$ 40.00 


Total 


...| 2| 22| 


| 155| 38 | 


59| 


| 40.00 



*Includes missionaries. 
|No report. 







Elementary Schools- 




Mission Station 


53 

~ 3 


co 


co 

"a 

s 






































o <" 




o 


o 








H 


c/3 


H 


pq 


O 


fo 




108 


I 2 


198 


126 


72 


$38.00 




24 


1 


24 


24 




.25 





Total | 222| 3 \ 222 \ 150 | 72 |$38.25 

*The school was at Dille before the station was moved 
to Lassa. 



Inventory of Africa Mission 
Property, 1930 

GARKIDA: 

Ruth Royer Kulp Memorial Hospital 
and equipment $15,000.00 

Other property 6,500.00 

LASSA: 

Property 2,500.00 

GARDEMNA: 

Property 1,000.00 

TOTAL $25,000.00 

Two facts should be borne in mind with 
reference to the value of mission property in 
Africa. One is that our mission sites are 
merely lease holds. None of the land we oc- 
cupy is owned by the mission and therefore 
does not enter into the valuation. The other 
is that in these early years it has not been 
felt wise to invest in permanent buildings. 
Consequently the Ruth Royer Kulp Memori- 
al Hospital buildings and equipment repre- 
sent more value than all other mission prop- 
erty combined. 

Prepared by William Beahm. 



TABLE IV. MEDICAL 









CO 














CO 
















S3 

a 
co 




'ft 






co 

CO 

a 
U 


co ' 

<D 

B 

o 


S3 
O 


c 
.2 

rt 


3 


S3 
U 




Mission Station 


CO 

53 

rt 




co 

CO 

< 


co 


o 

w 

53 


.a 

'u 
co 


(3 


*c3 


X 
o 


a 
O 


<L> 

O 


13 

S3 


rt 

CO 

H 








co 
u 

3 


co 
> 


"3. 

CO 

O 


CO 


S3 
CO 
ft 
CO 


.S3 

'o 

o 


CO 

43 


co 

°co 


u 

o 

'rt 


o 
e 


O rt 


"rt 


co 

u 




f^ 


£ 


£ 


X 


m 


Q 


> 


o 


> 


Sd 


§ 




h 


to 


Garkida 


1 


2 


3 


1 


60 




594 


18 


30S 


40 


134 


1,281 


41,859| 


1J72.50 




1 


2 






1 
1 










32 


350 


4,500] 






1 "^ 


4.50 











Total 



■ 1 2| 2| 5| lj 60| 2| 594[ 19| 320| 40| 166|1,631|46,359|$77.00 



Note: The above figures are for 1928. Statistics for 1929 have not been received. However, 
dicate that there has been steady growth in all departments of our mission in Africa. 



reports in- 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



261 



Scandinavia — Statistical and Financial Report 



SWEDEN 



Congregations 




in 

Z 

i 


0} 

.a 

'u 

O 
7. 
f. 

5 


B9 

5 
o 

Q 


(A 

> 

be 
rt 


ex 

c 

a; 


CO 

bo 

c 

V 

Q 

Ph* 


be 

CD 

<l> 

3 
"c 

3 


U3 

bo 

.s 

» 

>. 
o 

< 


in 

> 

u 
O 


en 

M 

o 

V 

o 

C 
2 


en 
en 
rt 
V 

fa 

> 

o 


0] 

"o 

o 

01 

5 

CO 


N 

m 


— 

rt 

Q 


— 

nj 

o 

Ih 

u 


> 
'33 
u 

u 

U 


Z- 

en 
i- 

E 

CD 


u 

13 
p. 

o 

en 

C 
_o 

3 

— -r ! 
£ 5 




o 

"!r. 

i 

be 
o 


o 

en 

i 
I 

o 

m 




2 
2 


i 




3 164 

3 472 


37 

46 


46 




5 

36 


386 1 

765 [ 4 


1 


1 2 


1 

1 






63 

68 


354.40264.501 95.50 

284.01| 16.48| 370.84 




Malmo | 2 

1 2 


2 
1 


2 


2 

3 


120 

166 


48 
32 


44 

41 


47 26 

48 1 39 


91 

234 


4 

4 


3 

4 


1 

1 


1 

6j 1 


1 


2| 54| 443.001242.00 1,155.17 

1| 54| 704.00| 43.24 2,101.64 




1 


2 
2 




2 


100 
202 


10 

14 


7 




12 


60 

86 


3| 2 
2| 3 


1| 21 

1| 1 






33 

13 


1 1,493 .81 




86.50| 55.25] 393.60 




1 
1 


1 






72 

73 


2 

21 








10 

82 


2| 1 1| 
2[ 1| 1| 








10 
10 


40.00; 70.00 

187.00[ 


149.00 




172.75 












7 
11 






1 


10| 2| 1| 
7| 1 1 1 1 


1 


6 20.00; 45.00 

7| 20.00| 40.00 


44.00 




51.23 


Totals 


6 
5 


4 2 




51 




6 


924 


11? 


87 


48 


75 


1,1741 12 


B| 


4 


6! 


2 




11152 


1,281.511154.97|3,090.06 



1929 statistics in bold face type. 
1925 statistics in light face type. 

Missionaries' support (including taxes) Kr. 

Native workers' support 

Traveling Expense 

Rents 

Property Expense 

Publication 

Miscellaneous 



1929 


1925 


8,147.46 


6,154.47 


9,000.00 


10,490.00 


1,614.82 


1,605.34 


1,971.20 


1,333.00 


387.48 


419.07 


641.07 


599.00 


143.00 





One Kr. equals 26.8 cents. 



Kr. 21,905.03 20,600. 

J. F. Graybill, Treasurer. 



DENMARK 











en 








0) 












to 












> 


bo 


W 




a 










co 


G 


C 


































Congregations 








u 

X 


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ft 


.2 


in 


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3 


u 

en 


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rt 

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en 


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>i 






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CD 












33 


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>> 


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— 
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a 


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3 


> 


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CD 

s 


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rt 








(0 






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^ 


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— 


Pu 


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Ph 


U 


J 


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Q 


^ 


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fa 


§ 


Thy 


1 


1 


? 


11 




1 


1 3 








15 


318.471 55.00|233.50 

979.591100.001 




1 




4 


40 






35| 3 


1 






52 


Vendsy ssel 


I 1 






3 










1 




1 


16 


36.00 45.00 






2 






27 


63 




34 


4 


1 






19 


168.47| 76.00 


4.00 


Total 


1 ? 


j 


21 16| 

4} 67| 63 


1 




3 


1 


1 1 


61 1 354.47 100.001233.50 

71 1 1.148.061 176.00] 4.00 




\ 3 






8Q 


7 


2 


1 



1929 statistics in bold face type. 
1925 statistics in light face type. 



Traveling expense 
Property expense 
Publication 





1929 


1925 


Kr. 


93.79 


212.80 




274.50 


231.82 




287.74 


146.68 



One Kr. equals 26.8 cents. 



Kr. 656.03 591.30 

J. F. Graybill, Treasurer. 



262 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
930 



Inventory of Scandinavia 
Mission Property 

SWEDEN 

Property in Malmo Kr. 154.684.GO 

Property in Vanaberga 8.000.00 

Property in Olserod :..'..... 9.C00.00 

Total Kr. 171.684.00 

DENMARK 

Mission House in Bedsted Kr. 9.000.00 

One Kr. equals 26.8 cents. 

The Work in Sweden 

(Continued from Page 209) 

The spirit of the age and great opposition 
from the State Church, church competition, 
the anti-Christ element makes our work dif- 
ficult. We are in touch with a good class of 
people. We continue to sow the good seed, 
praying that some may fall in good soil and 
bear fruit for the Master in God's own ap- 
pointed time. 

The Vannaberga Church 

This church was organized in 1890, two 
years after the church in Limhamn, and is 
located sixty miles north of Malmo in a 
thickly populated country. The plot of 
ground was staked off by Sister D. L. Miller 
of sacred memory, who also made a liberal 
donation to the work at this place. The mis- 
sion home consists of a good sized hall and 
good living quarters for the preacher, who 
has occupied the home and headed the work 
here from the very beginning. The value of 
this property is 8,000 kroner and it is in good 
condition. 

The membership in this church is very 
much scattered. The preacher makes his 
monthly visits to these isolated members and 
holds meetings in their homes. As a rule the 
meetings are quite well attended. 

This church has an outpost eighty-five 
miles farther north at a place called Tings- 
ryd, a town of several thousand inhabitants. 
A preacher is located at this place. In 1920 
it was utterly impossible to rent a hall for 
the work that looked so promising. Two 
brethren volunteered to build a chapel and 
finance the project if the mission would rent 
it for services, the rent to pay interest on the 
loan and also to pay off on the principal. 
This was gladly accepted and in the not far 
distant future we can add one more property 



valued at 10,000 kroner to the church's pos- 
sessions in Sweden. This is a hard field and 
progress is not so rapid. We sow in faith 
and leave the increase unto the Lord. 
The Kjavlinge Church 

This church was organized in 1895 and is 
located twenty miles north of Malmo. Dur- 
ing the first part of its history this church 
prospered under the able leadership of a 
young elder. His service however was too 
short. He was called to his reward. There 
was also an active official board, including a 
few young ministers. A mission house was 
built in a growing village and the prospects 
were good. 

The untimely death of the elder had a dis- 
couraging effect on the church. There was 
no one to take over the leadership. Church 
competition appeared on the scene and the 
once prosperous church decreased until there 
were only a few members present. Some had 
moved to other places and are members of 
the church there. Some went to other de- 
nominations. The house was sold in 1911. 
There is an elderly resident minister in the 
congregation who holds services in the first 
elder's widow's home and at several other 
places. The prospects at this point are not 
encouraging. 

The Simrishamn Church 

This church is located sixty miles east 
from Malmo, by the Baltic Sea. The mem- 
bers were organized into a church in 1916. 
At one time the work looked encouraging 
and we had planned to locate a preacher at 
this place, but we lacked a suitable place for 
worship, and the Baptists, in whose hall we 
had our meetings, would not agree to open 
their hall for a more aggressive work. So 
we dismissed the plan. 

The members are aged and we simply pas- 
tor the work here by occasional visits to en- 
courage them to remain faithful to the end. 
The Olserod Church 

This is the last organization effected in the 
Church of the Brethren in Sweden. For over 
twenty years there were two members living 
at this place, who held their membership in 
the Vannaberga Church and Elder Jonsson 
had occasional meetings there. There " had 
not been dividing lines between the churches 
in this country. About 1913 we made dividing 
lines and gave each church its territory for 
work. At the same time we also located an 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



263 



elder at Olserod in a small village. The op- 
position from the State Church was strong, 
but there was no other free church work es- 
tablished in this section. In 1916 the Olserod 
Church was organized. As the work grew, 
opposition increased so that no hall could be 
rented for 1920. There was a property for 
sale and this was bought as a mission home. 
With the death of the elder's wife the church 
here received a shock and growth ceased. 
The elder concluded that his work was done 
here and asked to be moved. He now has 
charge of the church where he was called to 
the ministry. An active young man was put 
in charge in 1923. In a few years the work 
outgrew the quarters and plans were made 
to build a larger house and at a better loca- 
tion. The former house had to be sold at a 
loss. A splendid one was erected at a cost 
of 9,000 kroner. This involves a debt of over 
4,000 kroner, which the church has volun- 
teered to shoulder and pay. We had urged 
the church to hold the property in their name 
if they made themselves responsible for the 
debt, but they prefer to pay for the Mission 
Board's property, which speaks creditably 
for them. They have no wealthy members 
but shoulder the responsibility in faith and 
hope which putteth not to shame. 

This church is well organized and has a 
healthy growth. They have outposts within 
a six mile radius where services are well 
attended. May the good work continue. 

Growth in Offering for Mission Work 

In our offering for mission work we are 
still far from the goal but we are trying to 
keep in sight. The encouraging feature 
about this is the development in the right 
direction. I know of a Sunday-school in the 
States that could not meet its own expendi- 
tures thirty years ago, but if I am not mis- 
taken this very Sunday-school raised over 
$3,000.00 toward the mission deficit in 1929. 

A comparison of twenty-seven years re- 
veals the following growth : 

The total offerings to general work are as 
follows : 

kroner 

In 1902 127.95 

1909 48.40 

1919 1,925.00 

1929 4,561.83 

The reader can now d^ w t\is own conclu- 
sion. 



The Work in Denmark 

In this field the work has been handicapped 
by Elder M. Johansen's throat trouble. He 
is not able to do any public speaking worth 
mentioning and has not exercised much dur- 
ing the past year. Most of the services have 
been held by the writer who made three 
trips, held thirteen meetings, conducted 
three council meetings, and one love feast, 
and made ninety-three pastoral visits. 

The members lament the conditions and ask 
what the prospects are for permanent help. 
There is a little Sunday-school at Bedsted. 
The work here is badly in need of some one 
to lead them. We expect to give them more 
encouragement in the future. 

In Denmark we have one mission prop- 
erty, built in 1916. The value of this prop- 
erty is about 9,000 kroner. There is a small 
loan on it. Several properties were sold dur- 
ing the past seven years because of lack of 
workers and poor location. 

MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Conference Offering, 1930. As of April 30, 1930, the 
Conference (budget) offering for the year ending Feb- 
ruary 28, 1931, stands as follows: 
Cash received since March 1, 1930 $13,141.47 

(The 1930 budget of $311,000.00 is 4.2% raised, where- 
as it should be 16.6%.) 

Mission Board Treasury Statement. The following 
shows the condition of mission finances on April 30, 
1930: 

Income since March 1, 1930 $20,639.21 

Income same period last year 47,820.72 

Expense since March 1, 1930 41,302.13 

Expense same period last year 40,027.67 

Mission surplus April 30, 1930 14,079.74 

Mission surplus March 31, 1930 20,064.22 

Decrease in surplus, April, 1930 5,984.48 

April Receipts. Contributions were received during 
April by funds as follows: 

Total Rec'd 
Receipts since 3-1-30 

World Wide Missions $1,630.60 $4,790.01 

Aid Societies' Mission Fund— 1927 1,093.30 1,528.65 

Home Missions 28.00 82.96 

Greene County, Virginia, Mission 25.00 35.00 

Foreign Missions 336.97 608.11 

B. Y. P. D.— 1929 37.50 254.61 

B. Y. P. D.— 1930 61.00 61.00 

Home Missions Share Plan 9.00 14.00 

Challenge Fund 145.00 500.00 

India Mission 137.10 189.10 

India Boarding School 85.00 111.25 

India Share Plan 155.00 155.00 

India Missionary Supports 360.64 711.43 

Vyara Church Building Fund.... 100.00 100.00 

Ahwa Church Building Fund.... 50.00 50.00 

China Mission 5.00 183.63 

China Native Worker 52.83 52.83 

China Share Plan 24.35 249.35 

China Missionary Supports 103.06 317.26 

Africa Missionary Supports 473.40 1,054.43 

Africa Mission 168.82 323.99 

Africa Share Plan 511.39 1,006.39 

Near East Relief 11.00 11.00 

China Famine Relief 2,289.98 3,651.55 

Africa Leper Fund 20.00 20.00 

Conference Budget Donations.... 177.49 751.70 

Conference Budget Designated... 67.77 87.77 



264 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



The United Student Volunteers 

BERTHA LONGENECKER* 



The United Student Volunteers of the 
Church of the Brethren Schools look back 
over the past five years just enough to see 
wherein they may profit and move on. 

Typical of youth they are interested not 
so much in the past but in the great future. 
So just a little glance at the past five years. 
The aim has been to be united with Christ in 
service and to recruit young people to con- 
secrate fully their lives to the propagation 
of the gospel. The group is composed of 
those who have been called by God to de- 
vote their lives primarily and directly to 
ministering to spiritual needs either in the 
homeland or abroad. The group includes as- 
sociate members who feel definitely called 
by God to enter a Christian vocation or pro- 
fession and in so doing devote their lives 
without reserve as a Christian steward in 
sharing equally with the missionaries the 
task of world evangelization. 

They believe that while they are in school, 
they are LIVING, and thus should carry on 
missionary work while they are making 
preparation for greater tasks that are just 
beyond. This is done in a number of ways : 
(1) Mission study and devotional life on the 
campus. The youth of our colleges are eager 

*Vice President and Educational Secretary. 



to spend their lives where the need is great. 
Through mission study the volunteers keep 
tuned in to the cries of the lost world. Many 
a youth has grown by leaps and bounds up- 
on entering into the devotional life with the 
volunteers. Testimonies come similar to this 
one : "I had been a Christian for a number of 
years, but once I began associating and 
praying with consecrated volunteers a mar- 
velous change took place in my life which 
resulted in my becoming a volunteer." (2) 
Deputation to the churches has been a power 
in the Kingdom of God. Churches have been 
awakened to new missionary zeal by the 
messages brought by the volunteers and the 
influence of their lives. One definite influ- 
ence has been that of getting the young peo- 
ple to consider making preparation to give 
their lives in some great Christian service. 
The volunteers have had their lives enriched 
many fold through service. The members of 
the teams return to the campuses having dis- 
covered some of the joys of Christian serv- 
ice. (3) Supporting missions financially. 
During these five years the volunteers have 
had a definite project each year. Following 
is the list of projects : 
1924-25 — Evangelism at Vyara, India. 



Volunteer Membership, Deputations, Missionary Projects 











a 






















£ 
















bo 


<u 




o 






u 
u 


C 

o 


en 


t/3 


>> 

rt 


5 


bfi 


4) 


<v 
W 


ns 


u 


en 

<L> 


O 




PQ 


3 

5 


PQ 


p 


G 


> 

,-1 




Pm 


s 



Membership 



1924-25. 
1925-26. 
1926-27. 
1927-28. 
1928-29. 



1 43 


19 


37 


1 


22 


40 




39 


12 


11 


57 


8 


33 




18 


34 




42 


15 


11 


43 


6 


34 


10 


12 


32 


28 


36 


20 


14 1 


48 


1 


36 





31 


35 


26 


33 


J30 


10 1 



| 224 
218 

| 235 

| 230 



Deputation 



1924-25. 
1925-26. 
1926-27. 
1927-28. 
1928-29. 



26 



207 
279 
231 
196 



Project 



1924-25. 
1925-26. 
1926-27. 
1927-28. 
1928-29. 



$647.00 
609.12 
485.13 
405.77 
561.00 



$100.00 

139.35 

2.00 

122.50 

105.00 



$320.00 
717.00 
317.72 
414.50 
240.82 



$ 69.47 

26.63 

228.61 

13.00 



$419.00 
311.50 
192.00 
146.90 



$ 76.00 
141.49 
619.99 
613.47 



$ 85.50 
105.00 



$ 949.00 

1,054.25 

1,144,50 

666.00 



197.69| 1,108.43| 400.00| 1,163.25 



$ 46.25|$134.50|$ 58: 
266.96| 235.001 165.05 
224.46| 415.43J 108.00 
150.00| 132.50 10.00 
182.41 196.001 



00 $2 



,904.72 
3,771.35 
3,737.84 
2,661.64 
4,167.60 



Prepared by Ora Huston, Pres. and Traveling Sec, and Bertha Longenecker ? Vice Pres. and Ed. Sec. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



265 



1925-26 — Shantung University work, China. 
1926-27 — Dormitories for the Boys' Vocation- 
al Training School, Anklesvar, In- 
dia, and Summer Pastors and 
Women Workers. 
1927-28 — Evangelism in India and Summer 

Pastors and Women Workers. 
1928-29 — Each college helping to support an 
alumnus on the foreign field. 
Each year at the Annual Conference the 
volunteers hold a business session and ren- 
der a program which people from all over 
the brotherhood are eager to hear. 

The executive committee from 1924 to 1927 
consisted of the president, vice president and 
the traveling secretary. During the year 
1927-28 the latter was also secretary-treas- 
urer. Beginning with 1928 the executive 
committee consisted of only two officers, the 
president who also acted as traveling secre- 
tary and the vice president who was also 
educational secretary. The executive com- 
mittee has aimed to keep the volunteer mis- 
sionary spirit keyed high on the Church of 
the Brethren campuses and to help with spe- 
cific problems when possible, through the 
traveling secretaries and correspondence. 

Following is a list of the officers who have 
served during the last five years : 
1924-25— Pres., M. Guy West ; V. Pres., Clara 
Harper; Trav. Sec, Leroy Dudrow. 
1925-26— Pres., C. O. Miller; V. Pres., Clara 
Harper; Trav. Sec, Maynard Cas- 
sady. 
1926-27— Pres., M. Guy West; V. Pres., Su- 
san Stoner; Trav. Sec, Minor My- 
ers. 
1927-28— Pres., Ed. Ziegler; V. Pres., Bernice 
Bollinger ; Trav. Sec, Harlan Smith. 
1928-29— Pres. and Trav. Sec, Ed. Ziegler; 
V. Pres. and Ed. Sec, Bertha Long- 
enecker. 

If the future missionaries and church lead- 
ers are to come from the volunteer group, 
then the volunteers can well afford to ask 
themselves the question, are we measuring 
up to the demands of the present day both 
in quantity and quality? God help them to 
start the next five years with a new enthusi- 
asm so that the Christian message will reach 
and change lives the world around. 
^?* t£* 

Save this report. It will surely be valuable 
for future reference. 



AMONG THE MARGI PEOPLE 

(Continued from Page 207) 

study regular services were begun. These 
were held on Sundays and on market day, 
in the village market place. School was held 
for boys and girls. Attendance was very 
irregular, especially during the farming 
season. However a start was made. Special 
evangelistic efforts were made to reach the 
men and women. The results were encour- 
aging. 

In December Dr. and Mrs. Burke returned 
from furlough and were appointed to Dille. 
Soon after their arrival a search was made 
for a site with a better water supply. One 
was found at Lassa five miles east of Dille. 
Dr. and Mrs. Burke moved to Lassa in the 
spring of 1928. The Kulps remained at 
Dille until the fall of the same year. 

In January and February of 1929, the 
Kulps made a tour of the district in order 
to acquaint themselves with the people and 
make a general survey. Many of the vil- 
lages are still located among the hills but 
in some cases the people are now moving 
out into the valleys where the farms are 
located. In the old villages there is much 
filth and disease. In the new villages along 
the streams there appeared to be more 
cleanliness and better health. In some vil- 
lages the dialect spoken differed slightly 
from that at Dille. 

In September of 1928 Mrs. Burke became 
very ill and as an immediate operation was 
required they both returned to America. 
This was a great loss to the work. In the 
few months that they were located at Lassa 
a large medical work had developed. They 
had also begun regular preaching services. 
The Kulps moved to Lassa in October, 1928. 
Mr. and Mrs. Heckman spent about three 
and one half months at Lassa in the be- 
ginning of 1929 to help with the building. 
When they returned to Garkida, Dr. and 
Mrs. Gibbel came to Lassa and remained 
until their furlough was due in November 
ot the same year. 

There are two missionary residences at 
Lassa, a medical compound and two school 
buildings containing three school rooms and 
a chapel. 

The medical work is very promising in 
spite of the fact of there not being medical 
missionaries regularly at the station. Risku 



266 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



Madziga, the native dispenser, is a Christian 
of exceptional promise. Once there is a 
permanent medical staff the work is assured 
of a steady growth. 

Since the erection of the school buildings 
at Lassa the school has been carried on 
with increasing success both as to numbers 
and regularity of attendance. Pilasar Sawa, 
a Christian Bura from Garkida, assists with 
the school work. Within the next few years 
it should be possible to start school work 
on a small scale in a number of the near- 
by villages. A primer has been made and 
printed on the multigraph. There has been 
a small Christian Bura community settled 
at Lassa. They came in the wake of the 
mission. For these eight or ten Bura Chris- 
tians regular services are held. They are 
given school work in the less busy time of 
the year, usually in the rainy season. 

With the help of Risku and Pilasar regu- 
lar services are now held in five villages. 
The evangelistic work begun at Dille con- 
tinues to promise well. There are a num- 
ber of men who are faithful in attendance 
and in other ways show their interest in 
the Christian message. Of the Bura com- 
munity there have been six who have made 
a profession of Christianity and one has 
been baptized. 

HAVING THE WILL AND FINDING 
THE WAY 

(Continued from Page 220) 
standings regarding it." The author's name 
was " Torpedo." Some of the statements 
were very funny, others were actually un- 
true and we were sorry to see them on the 
paper, but others were very good and to 
the point. At any rate we knew that the 
readers would understand we were not the 
authors and so whatever they might think 
of the paper the mission would not receive 
the blame nor the approval which the paper 
might call forth. 

There isn't time in this visit to tell you 
all the interesting things that happened. 
Perhaps another time I can tell you how 
the second block was built. 

THE JOYS OF PIONEERING 

(Continued from Page 224) 

all had them. The other lad had worked 
for white people and he said we were ver- 



min free. The argument waxed warm. I 
was asked to settle the matter. I said we 
did not have the pests in our clothing. The 
first lad, loath to give in, said if that was 
the case it must be because they were killed 
when our clothes were ironed with hot irons. 

You wonder how we managed the lan- 
guage. Well, we were compelled to use the 
direct method. We had neither grammar 
nor books of any kind at first. We had to 
get it third handed. We would speak in 
English to one man. He in turn would 
speak in Hausa to another. From this man 
we would get what was supposed to be the 
Bura equivalent of what we had said in 
English. How strange those first attempts 
at writing Bura. seem now. I still have 
preserved in a note book a few " first at- 
tempts." We could not tell where one word 
ended and where the next began. What 
we thought at first to be single words we 
discovered later to be phrases or even entire 
sentences. You ask why no literature has 
yet been developed in these languages. It 
is because there are so many. Northern 
Nigeria with its more than 260 languages 
outbabels Babel. Beginning mission work 
as late as 1922 we are fortunate to find such 
a large group (200,000) composing a single 
language area in which no mission work 
has yet been attempted. All of the 200,000 
do not speak one language, but the dialects 
they use are very closely related. Yes, I 
have learned a second dialect, the Margi. 
It is necessary to learn it for beginning 
work but we plan to develop an extensive 
literature only in Bura. This will be used 
by all. " The Shrine of a People's Soul " 
is the beautiful term a. writer has recently 
used in speaking of the mother tongue of 
these primitive peoples. That expression 
explains why we are out here digging and 
hunting for words. We want to learn how 
to express the ideas which will touch their 
souls. Heretofore they have had no litera- 
ture. No member of their tribe had ever 
read anything in his own language. Ours 
is the opportunity to provide the only litera- 
ture they will have for many years to come. 
Would it not thrill you to think that you 
controlled the reading matter of an entire 
tribe? 

But now comes the most glorious part of 
this pioneering. We have come, built our 
houses, learned the language. We go out 



June 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



267 



to tell them the "Wonderful Words of 
Life." We go in " fear and trembling " lest 
we make some dreadful error, but withal 
in great joy. "For this cause came we forth." 
At first many refuse to bother to listen to 
our stammering Bura. They refuse to be- 
lieve that we can possibly be speaking in 
their own tongue. But gradually we win a 
hearing. Today, week after week in a dozen 
villages and more a new message is being 
proclaimed. New to them but to us the 
"Old, Old Story." 

I wish I could share with you the feeling 
that comes to me as I go into a village to 
preach for the first time. To myself I say, 
I wonder how many in this little group are 
hearing about Jesus for the first time. 
Could one have a rarer privilege? Could 
one be entrusted with a more responsible 
task? And then after months, or perhaps 
even years, the seed sown brings the harvest 
of a soul saved. That crowns the joy of 
pioneering. 

AN EVENING WITH F. C. ROHER 

(Continued from Page 234) 

mission point has been opened which is 
promising to be a very fruitful enterprise for 
the church. 

As strangers, the first year of our work 
was primarily with the children of one con- 
gregation in D. V. B. S., Boys' Clubs, and 
other organizations for children. The loca- 
tion of this church was somewhat out of the 
general territory of churches in which we 
hoped to work. So the following year we 
were fortunate to have the opportunity to 
accept a teaching position in Jefferson, the 
county seat of Ashe County. Here we are 
at the hub of five state highways radiating 
through this and adjacent counties where our 
churches are located. From here I can reach 
any one of these ten churches in from thirty 
minutes to three hours' driving. 

When we had been here about a year, we 
began to find our place. The people were 
glad to cooperate. We had two fine Bible 
Schools the second summer. Since then our 
summers have been more than full. 

One church of our district had been plan- 
ning to join a neighboring district where 
there was more to do. Now it is one of our 
most active and satisfying churches. One 
fine young woman was attending a church 



school of another denomination. After a 
summer of D. V. B. S. teaching, she is satis- 
fied with our own church. She is to take 
up Nurses' Training in Winston-Salem soon, 
and I'm sure there will be more good news 
from her. 

Two other young women and two young 
men have done splendid work in D. V. B. S. 
One of the men finishes high school this 
spring, hopes to enter college in the fall, and 
is looking toward the mission field. The other 
man is in college. His summer will be filled 
with singing schools. He is an active minis- 
ter. The two ladies are in college this win- 
ter, expecting to teach school next year. One 
has been a successful teacher for several 
years. 

Several other young people have shown a 
desire to serve the church and have done 
their part well when given an opportunity to 
serve. You know, it's only a short time un- 
til "tomorrow," when they will be our church 
leaders and it is a pleasure to help lead on 
into closer fellowship and love with the 
church. 

At two of the churches Frontier Boys' 
Clubs have been organized. There are plen- 
ty of boys in these mountains and at each 
of the ten churches there is an opportunity 
for this work — only the lack of a leader hin- 
ders. Last summer twenty of the boys made 
a trip to Roanoke, Va. We had a great time. 

In the home community of Jefferson I 
have organized a troop of Boy Scouts. Our 
meetings are held twice each month when 
some of the problems common to all boys, 
are discussed. Last summer we made an ed- 
ucational trip to Washington City. Arrange- 
ments had been made for us to be received 
by President Hoover at the White House. 
Mr. Hoover is much interested in the .boys 
of the mountain sections. During our sev- 
eral days in the city our headquarters were 
at the Church of the Brethren. The boys 
greatly appreciated the generous hospitality 
of the Brethren and left with great respect 
for them. 

Must you go now? Stay for supper. We'll 
have corn bread and bird-eye beans. Stay 
all night. No? Well, I'm surely glad you've 
been to see us. Now, come again when you 
can stay a week and we will visit some 
churches and people. I'd like to tell you 
some of the interesting experiences we've 
had in the missionary project work, too. 



268 



The Missionary Visitor 



June 
1930 



Supports of Missionaries 



California 

Breneman, I and O. (La Verne congregation), John 
I. Kaylor, India. 

Covina Missionary Class, one-half support of Henry 
K. Oberholtzer (son of I. E. Oberholtzer), China. 

Glendora Sunday-school, "Willing Workers' Class," 
Paul Rupel budget $100, Africa. 

La Verne congregation and Sunday-school, Lynn A. 
Blickenstaff and wife, India; Ina M. Kaylor, India; 
Susan Stoner, India. 

La Verne congregation "Women's Bible Class," 
Myrtle Kaylor (daughter of John I. Kaylor), India. 

Lindsay congregation, Dr. Ida Metzger, India. 
. Long Beach Sunday-school, Lucile G. Heckman, 
Africa. 

Northern California Sunday-schools, Minneva Neher, 
China. 

"Senior," "L. B. A.," "Friendship," and "Loyal" 
classes of Pasadena Sunday-school, Dr. J. W. Fox, 
India. 

Southern California Aid Societies, Besse K. Fox, 
India. i 

Southern California Sunday-schools, Clarence C. 
Heckman, Africa. 

Canada 

Clark, John I., I. E. Oberholtzer, China. 

Colorado 

Eastern Colorado congregations, Anna N. Crum- 
packer, China. 

Nickey, S. G., of Sterling congregation, Dr. Bar- 
bara Nickey, India. 

Rocky Ford congregation and Sunday-school, Ernest 
M. Wampler, China. 

Idaho 

Idaho and Western Montana Christian Workers' So- 
cieties, Anetta C. Mow, India. 

Illinois 

Chicago Sunday-school, $600 on work budget of 
Paul Rupel. 

Cerro Gordo Sunday-school, Dr. A. R. Cottrell, 
India. 

Mount Morris College Missionary Society, D. J. 
Lichty, India. 

Mount Morris congregation, Ruth Ulery, China. 

Mount Morris Sunday-school, Sadie J. Miller, India. 

Northern Illinois and Wisconsin Sunday-schools, 
Kathryn Garner, India. 

Virden Sisters' Aid Society, one-half support of 
Leah Ruth Ebey (daughter of Adam Ebey), India. 

Virden and Girard Sunday-schools. Dr. Laura M. 
Cottrell, India. 

Indiana 

Manchester Sunday-school, Alice K. Ebey, India. 

Manchester College Sunday-school, Laura J. Shock, 
China. 

Manchester College Student Volunteers, Clara Harp- 
er budget, $500, Africa. 

Mexico congregation, Lillian Grisso, India. 

Middle Indiana Sunday-schools, Mabel W. Moomaw, 
India. 

Northern Indiana Sunday-schools, Mary Schaeffer, 
China; Marguerite Burke budget, $550, Africa. 

Northern Indiana Y. P. D.'s, Clara Harper budget, 
$500, Africa. 

Southern Indiana Sunday-schools, W. J. Heisey, 
China. 

Iowa 

Cedar Rapids Sunday-school, Emma Horning, China. 

Dallas Center Sunday-school, Helser budget, $500, 
Africa. 

Des Moines Valley congregation, Elnora Schechter 
budget, $50, Africa. 

Iyester congregation, W. Harlan Smith and wife, 
China. 

North English and English River Sunday-schools, 
Nettie M. Senger, China. 

Panther Creek Sunday-school, one-half support of 
Olivia D. Ikenberry, China. 

South Waterloo Sunday-school, Jennie B. Miller, 
India. 



South Waterloo Christian Workers' Society and Aid 
Society, A. S. B. Miller, India. 

South Waterloo Sunday-school, "Loyal Helpers' 
Class," one-half support of Josephine Miller (daugh- 
ter of A. S. B. Miller), India. 

South Waterloo Sunday-school Primary Depart- 
ment, one-half support, Marjorie Miller (daughter of 
A. S. B. Miller), India. 

South Waterloo Sunday-school, Intermediate and 
Junior Departments, one-half support, Lorito Shull 
(daughter of C. G. Shull), India. 

Waterloo City congregation and Sunday-school, 
Mary S. Shull, India. 

Kansas 

Northeastern Kansas Sunday-schools, Ella Ebbert, 
India. 

Northwestern Kansas Sunday-schools, Howard L. 
Alley, India. 

Southwestern Kansas congregations, Frank H. 
Crumpacker, China. 

Yoder, J. D. (of Monitor congregation), Myrtle 
Pollock, China. 

Maryland 

Hagerstown congregation, Harlan J. and Ruth F. 
Brooks, India. 

Middle Maryland Sunday-schools, H. P. Garner, 
India. 

Eastern Maryland Sunday-schools, Ethel A. Roop, 
India. 

Michigan 

Michigan Sunday-schools, Primary Departments, 
Haven Crumpacker (daughter of F. H. Crumpacker), 
China. 

Michigan Sunday-schools, Junior Departments, 
Maurine Miller (daughter of A. S. B. Miller), India. 

Missouri 

Baile, J. H., one-half support of Jennie Mohler, 
India. 

Middle Missouri congregations, one-half support of 
Jennie M. Mohler, India. 

North Carolina 

Fraternity congregation, one- half support of Dr. 
Russell L. Robertson, Africa. 

Ohio 

Bear Creek congregation, Anna M. Lichty, India. 

Cleveland and East Nimishillen congregations, 
Goldie Swartz, India. 

Covington congregation, I. W. Moomaw, India. 

Happy Corner S. S. (Lower Stillwater congrega- 
tion), Betty J. Brooks (daughter of H. J. Brooks), 
India. 

Hartville congregation, Anna B. Brumbaugh, India. 

Northwestern Ohio Sunday-schools, Hattie Z. Alley, 
India. 

Olivet congregation, A. D. Helser, Africa. 

Olivet Aid Society, Esther Mae Helser (daughter of 
A. D. Helser), Africa. 

Owl Creek congregation, one-half support, Lola 
Helser, Africa. 

Salem congregation, Minnie F. Bright, China. 

Southern Ohio Sunday-schools, Elizabeth Baker 
Wampler, China. 

Trotwood congregation, Elizabeth Oberholtzer, 
China. 

Pennsylvania 

Beaver, Ellis and Carl (of Lewistown cong.), Beulah 
Woods, India. 

Brandt, D. E., and family (of Upper Conewago 
congregation), E. L. Ikenberry, China. 

Carson Valley congregation, partial support of 
Esther Beahm, Africa. 

Chiques congregation, Alice M. Graybill, Sweden. 

Conestoga congregation, Ida Buckingham, Sweden. 

Coventry congregation, H. Stover Kulp, Africa. 

East Petersburg Sunday-school, Ina M. Kaylor 
budget, $550, India. 

Eastern Pennsylvania Sunday-schools, Kathryn 
Ziegler, India. 



June 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



269 



"Faithful Workers Class," Snake Spring congrega- 
tion, J. Homer Bright, China. 

"Good Samaritan Bible Class," Walnut Grove con- 
gregation, one-third support of Anna Hutchison, 
China. 

Green Tree congregation, Clara Harper, Africa. 

Huntingdon congregation and college, J. M. Blough, 
India. 

Indian Creek congregation, Sara Shisler, Africa. 

Maple Spring (Quemahoning congregation), one- 
half support, Esther Beahm, Africa. 

Middle Pennsylvania Sunday-schools, Bertha Rob- 
ertson, Africa. 

Palmyra congregation, J. F. Graybill, Sweden. 

Peach Blossom congregation, two-thirds support of 
Anna Hutchison, India. 

Richland congregation, B. Mary Royer, India. 

Salunga Sunday-school (E. Petersburg congrega- 
tion), Baxter M. Mow, India. 

Scalp Level congregation, personal support, $600 and 
$600 on work budget, Dr. H. L. Burke, Africa. 

Shade Creek, Rummel, Scalp Level and Windber 
congregations, Anna Z. Blough, India. 

Southeastern Pennsylvania Sunday-schools, Elnora 
Schechter, Africa. 

Southern Pennsylvania Sunday-schools, Adam Ebey, 
India. 

Spring Creek congregation, Eliza B. Miller, India. 

"Sunshine Scatters Class" Mechanic Grove congre- 
gation (partial support) Joseph Mow (son of B. M. 
Mow), India. 

York Sunday-school, J. M. Blough Budget, $550, 
India. 

Walnut Grove (Johnstown congregation), Byron M. 
Flory, China. 

Western Pennsylvania Sunday-schools, Ida Shu- 
maker and Olive Widdowson, India; Grace Clapper, 
China, and William M. Beahm, Africa. 

"Willing Workers' Class," Mechanicsburg Sunday- 
school, Lois Mow (partial support) (daughter of 
B. M. Mow), India. 

Western Pennsylvania Young People's Council, Mar- 
guerite S. Burke, Africa. 

White Oak congregation, B. Mary Royer budget, 
$600, India. 
Tennessee 

Congregations of Tennessee, Dr. Russell L. Robert- 
son, Africa. 

Virginia 

Barren Ridge congregation, Nora Flory, China. 



Belmont congregation (partial support), Naomi Ru- 
pel, Africa. 

Lebanon congregation, Chalmer G. Shull, India. 

Middle River, "Willing Workers' Class," Verna 
Flory (daughter of B. M. Flory), China. 

Middle River, Aid Society, Wendell Flory (son of 
B. M. Flory), China. 

"Martha and Mary" Class, Linville Creek Sunday- 
school, partial support of Elizabeth Long (daughter 
of I. S. Long), India. 

Moomaw, Leland C, and Sunday-schools of First 
and Southern Virginia, Elsie N. Shickel, India. 

Northern Virginia congregations, I. S. and Erne V. 
Long, India. 

Pleasant Valley congregation, Edna R. Flory, China. 

Roller, M. S., partial support of Naomi Rupel, 
Africa. 

Unity congregation, partial support of Naomi Rupel, 
Africa. 

Unity congregation, Naomi Rupel budget $150, 
Africa. 

Washington 

Wenatchee congregation, Paul Rupel, Africa. 
West Virginia 

Eglon congregation, Anna B. Mow, India. 

CHINA MISSION TERRITORY 

(Continued from Page 253) 

moved. The field is ripe and the door is open. 
The removal of the idols in part of our ter- 
ritory has created a greater challenge than 
ever before. It takes away the gods that 
they did worship, and there is a strong tend- 
ency to lose faith in all religions unless 
other seed has been sown to show them the 
truth. Therefore, it behooves us to bring 
Jesus Christ, the true Savior of mankind, to 
them speedily. May we not fail to meet this 
great need before it is too late ! 



"CONSIDER" 


Grace 


Troy 


Luke JO: 2 


Some have gone forth with the story so 

old, 
Reaping a harvest more precious than 


Some have gone forth far from loved 


ones and home, 


gold; 


Leaving their all for His service alone; 


Are you, too, faithfully doing your share, 


Counting the gain of this world only dross, 


Helping together by gifts and by prayer? 


Seeking no glory save that of His cross. 






Some have gone forth - but so many re- 


Some have gone forth into darkness so 


main, 


dense, 


Safely at home - other honors to gain ; 


Darkness that crushes - a darkness intense ; 


Millions of lost ones who never have 


There in far lands where their Lord is 


heard, 


not known, 


Few - oh so few, to go forth with His 


Gladly to work for His glory alone. 


Word. 



270 The Missionary Visitor Jjjf 



1930 



Order Extra Copies 

of 

THIS REPORT 



Never before was such a comprehensive report made of our 
Church of the Brethren mission fields. Not for five years is an- 
other such report contemplated. 

Copies of this Visitor should be placed with: 

1. Members not receiving the Visitor. 

2. Neighbors who may be interested in our church. 

3. Members of other denominations who are interested in all 
mission progress. 

4. Sunday-school libraries for future reference. 

5. Members of classes using this report for special study of 
our mission fields. 

The missionaries and editors spared no effort in bringing to 
the church this complete, comprehensive picture of our mission 
fields. The members who have given faithfully year after year 
deserve such a report. Now let everyone use this material for 
the greatest possible benefit. The investment of time and 
money put in this report will yield large dividends if it is used to 
its fullest capacity. 

Single copies, 15c; ten or more copies to one address at 10c 
per copy. 

General Mission. Board 
, OF THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN ^ 

I INCORPORATED * 

Elgirv. Illinois 



J ™ e The Missionary Visitor 271 

A MESSAGE TO 

MISSIONARY 

COMMITTEES 

(%& 

In order to place this Visitor in as many homes as possible will 
you, with the help of the minister, lay plans for selling ten or more 
copies? The juniors are always glad to work at a job like this. Bring 
the message of Church of the Brethren missions to as many people 
as possible. 

Now is the time to lay plans for class discussions, based on this 
report. This will work well in Sunday-school classes. Christian 
Workers' Meeting will find these lessons profitable. The missionary 
devotional service before the Sunday-school once each month can 
draw from this store house. 

Lessons based on this report will appear in the August Mission- 
ary Visitor. Plans are under way for their appearance also in the 
Christian Workers' Booklet for the first half of 1931. 

Use the blank below to order the Visitors you believe you can 
sell. Price for single copies, 15c. For ten or more, 10c each. 

General Mission Board 
Elgin, 111. 

Please send me copies the June 1931 Missionary Visitor, Present- 
ing our Mission Fields. Enclosed find to cover the cost of same. 

Name 

Address 

Congregation 



Church of the Brethren Missionaries 

Supported in Whole or in Part by Funds Administered by the General Mission Board 
With the Year They Entered Service 



AMERICA 

Church of the Brethren In- 
dustrial School, Geer, Va. 

Bollinger, Amsey, and Flor- 
ence, 1922 

Finckh, Elsie, 1925 

Hersch, Orville, and Mabel, 
1925 

Kline, Alvin, and Edna, 1919 

Knight, Henry, March, Va. f 
1928 

Wampler, Nelie, 1922 

In Pastoral Service 

Bowman, Price, and Elsie, 
Bassett, Va., 1925 

Eby, E. H., and Emma, 2923 
St. Joseph Ave., St. Jo- 
seph, Mo., 1927 

Weiss, Lorell, 1188 Missouri 
Ave., Portland, Ore., 1927 

Haney, R. A., and Irva, 
Lonaconing, Md., 1925 

Rohrer, Ferdie, and Pearl, 
Jefferson, N. C, 1927 

Ziegler, Edward, and Ilda, 
405 E. Eleventh Ave., John- 
son City, Tenn., 1923 

Barr, Francis, and Cora, Al- 
bany, Ore., 1928 



SWEDEN 

Graybill, J. F., and Alice, 

Bergsgatan 45, M a 1 m 6, 

Sweden, 1911 
Norris, Glen M., and Lois, 

Spangatan, 3 8, M a 1 m 6, 

Sweden, 1929 

On Furlough 

Buckingham, Ida, Oakley, 
111., 1913 

CHINA 

Liao Chow, Shansi, China 

Hutchison, Anna, 1911 
Oberholtzer, I. E., and 

Elizabeth, 1916 
Pollock, Myrtle, 1917 
Senger, Nettie M., 1916 
Shock, Laura J., 1916 
Ulery, Ruth F., 1926 
Wampler, Ernest M., 1918, 

and Elizabeth, 1922 

Ping Ting Chow, Shansi, China 

Bright, J. Homer, and Min- 
nie, 1911 
Crumpacker, F. H., and Anna, 

1908 
Flory, Byron M., and Nora, 

1917 
Flory, Edna R., 1917 
Horning, Emma, 1908 
Metzger, Minerva, 1910 
Schaeffer, Mary, 1917 
Sollenberger, O. C, and 
Hazel, 1919 



Chow Yang, Shansi, China 

Clapper, V. _ Grace, 1917 

Cripe, Winnie, 1911 

Heisey, Walter J., and Sue, 
1917 

Neher, Minneva J., 1924 

Smith, W. Harlan, and Fran- 
ces, 1919 

Tai Yuan Fu, care of Y. M. 
C. A., Shansi, China 

Ikenberry, E. L., and Olivia, 

1922 
Myers, Minor M., and Sara, 

1919 

On Furlough 

* Brubaker, L. S., and Marie, 
331 S. 3d. Covina, Calif., 1924 



AFRICA 

Garkida, Nigeria, West Africa, 
via Jos 

Beahm, Wm. M., and Esther, 

1924 
Harper, Clara, 1926 
Heckman, Clarence C, and 

Lucile, 1924 
Robertson, Dr. Russell L., 

and Bertha C, 1927 
Shisler, Sara. 1926 

Lassa, via Maiduguri, Nigeria, 
West Africa 

Kulp, H. Stover, 1922, and 

Christina, 1927 
Rupel, Paul, and Naomi, 1929 
Schechter, Elnora, 1929 

On Furlough 

* Burke, Dr. Homer L., and 
Marguerite, 6317 Grand 
Ave., Chicago, 111., 1923 

Gibbel, Dr. J. Paul, and 
Verda, Girard, 111., 1926 

Helser, . Albert D., 1922, and 
Lola, Thornville, Ohio, 1923 



INDIA 

Ahwa, Dangs, Surat Dist., 
India 

Garner, H. P., and Kathryn, 

1916 
Royer, B. Mary, 1913 

faiklesvar, Broach Dist., India 

Grisso, Lillian, 1917 

Lichty, D. J., 1902, and Anna 

1912 
Miller, Sadie J., 1903 

Bulsar, Surat Dist., India 

Blickenstaff. Lynn A., and 

Mary, 1920 
Blough, J. M., and Anna, 

1903 



Cottrell, Dr. A. R., and 

Laura, 1913 
Fox, Dr. J. W., and Besse, 

1929 
Mohler, Jennie, 1916 
Shumaker, Ida C, 1910 

Dahanu Road, Thana Dist., 
India 

Blickenstaff, Verna M., 1919 
Ebbert, Ella, 1917 
Metzger, Dr. Ida, 1925 

Jalalpor, Surat Dist., India 

Miller, Eliza B., 1900 
Vada, Thana Dist., India 

Brumbaugh, Anna B., 1919 
Ebey, Adam, and Alice, 1900 
Shull, Chalmer, and Mary, 
1919 

Palghar, Thana Dist., India 

Alley, Howard L., and Hat- 
tie, 1917 

Umalla, Brooch Dist., India 

Miller, Arthur S. B., and 

Jennie, 1919 
Widdowson, Olive, 1912 
Ziegler, Kathryn, 1908 

Vyara, via Surat, India 

Brooks, Harlan J., and Ruth, 

1924 
Wagoner, J. E., and Ellen, 
1919 
Mow, Anetta, 1917 

Burjor Bag, Lunsikui, Nav- 
sari, India 

Mow, Baxter M., and Anna, 
1923 

Woodstock School, Landour 
Mussoorie, U. P., India 

Stoner, Susan L., 1927 

On Furlough 

Kaylor, John I., 1911, and 
Ina, DeGraff, Ohio, 1921. 

Long, I. S., and Effie, Bridge- 
water, Va., 1903 

Moomaw, I. W.. and Mabel, 
R. 3, Canton, Ohio, 1923 

Nickey, Dr. Barbara M^, 
3435 Van Buren St., Chi- 
cago, 111., 1915 

Roop, Ethel, 1926 

Shickel, Elsie N., 2211 Orange 
Ave. N. W., Roanoke, Va., 
1921 

Swartz, Goldie E.. R. 2, 
Ashland, Ohio, 1916 

Wolf, L. Mae, 3435 Van 
Buren St., Chicago, 111., 1922 

Woods, B e u 1 a h, Spencer, 
Ohio, 1924 



Otherwise employed in America until conditions permit return to the field. 



Please Notice. — Postage on letters to our missionaries is 5c for each ounce or fraction 
thereof and 3c for each additional ounce or fraction. -- 



THE 

SHARE 



PLAN 



The SHARE PLAN is a 
practical method whereby Sun- 
day-schools and individuals can 
do missionary work and receive 
regular reports from the field 
where their money is being used. 

Invest in Lives 

General Mission Board 

Elgin, Illinois 



(£nt\t\t<xU of Support 

GENERAL MISSION BOARD 
Church of the Brethren 



Cljtfl rprttfira flpL 

u a subscriber for I 

ary Work, of the 



re o/_ 



Jn the support of the General Mission^ 



In consideration of this contribution to Lne worK. the holder of this 
certificate wtll receive through the General Mission Board an annual report 
of the condition and progress of the worK of this station. 

Upon the completion of each annual payment a seal indicating the 
year for which such has been made, will be sent from the General Mis- 
sion Board. These may be affixed over the circles Indicated below. When 
the payments for five years have been completed this certificate wfll be de- 
clared entirely paid and If desired a new certificate wtll be Issued. 








U>« Church ot ut« 1 



Execute Your Own Will 



You do this when you get one of our annuity bonds. It will mean a big 
saving to the Lord's treasury in court costs, and lawyers' and administrators' fees. 

But, if You Make a Will- 

Get good legal help that your will may be properly made. To remember 
missions in your will the following form of bequest is recommended: 

" I give and bequeath to the General Mission Board of the Church of the Brethren, 
a corporation of the State of Illinois 5 , with its principal office at Elgin, Kane County, 

Illinois, its successors and assigns, forever, the sum of dollars 

($ ) to be used for the purpose of the said Board as specified in 

its charter." 

Write for our booklet which tells about annuity bonds and wills 

General Mission. Board 
Or THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN ^ 

Elgirv. Illinois 



THIS REPORT 




[read IT J 



Family Reading 



The section LIFE STORIES pre- 
sents a series of readings very 
suitable for use with family worship. Many families should plan to read a 
story a day, at the breakfast, at bed-time, or some other time when the 
family is assembled together. Read the story and locate the missionary who 
wrote it, by the directory and map. The eighteen readings will make you 
feel acquainted with your missionaries. 



Programs 



Missionary programs should give information 
about our fields. The task confronting us, 
the missionary force, the staff of native workers, the baptized converts, the 
financial cost, are all items of deep interest. The LIFE STORIES if 
told well will be capital program material. 



Group Discussions 



Lessons based on the material 
in this report will be printed 
in the August issue of " The Missionary Visitor." They will serve well 
for use in Christian Workers' and Young People's Meetings. Missionary 
and Aid Societies can use them. They will serve as fine supplementary 
material for any mission study course. India is the theme for mission 
study during the next twelve months. China will be the theme the fol- 
lowing year. Use this report to enrich those studies. Where churches 
cannot take up the regular mission studies this report can be the basis for 
a few lessons on our own fields. 



Research 



Save this report. It will be valuable for use in 
building sermons, preparing talks, in teaching 
classes and in ways not now foreseen. Put it in your library. 



THE 

MISSIONARY 



Visitor 




Church of the ^Brethren 



Vol. XXXII 



JULY, 1930 



No. 7 




693 Congregations and 
44 Districts Increased 
Their Giving Last Year 
to Missions and Church 
Promotion « « * « * 



274 The Missionary Visitor Jjjj 

The 1 930 Conference at Hershey 

The Conference closed in time for these ser ; from India, I. S. and Erne Long, I. W. 

news items to be printed in this Visitor. and Mabel Moomaw, Dr. Barbara M. Nickey, 

President Otho Winger, chairman of the Elsie N. Shickel, Goldie Swartz, Mae L. Wolf 

General Mission Board, was elected moder- and Beulah Woods. 

ator for the 1931 Conference to be held Others who have served on the mission 
somewhere in the western zone. Elder James field but are now detained in America were 
M. Moore presided in a very excellent way present and took part in the missionary ex- 
over the Hershey Conference. hibits. They include : From Africa, Ella 
The Conference offering totalled approxi- Flohr ; from China, N. A. Seese, Valley Mil- 
mately $71,000 as compared with an offering ler, Dr. Carl Coffman and Dr. Fred Wampler 
of $95,000 at Conference a year ago. The and wife ; from India, W. B. Stover, B. F. 
missionary spirit at Conference seemed very Summer, Q. A. Holsopple and wife, 
good and the reduced amount may be ac- Student Volunteers elected new officers : 
counted for in part by two factors. First, President, Roy Nickolson from Manchester 
the large missionary gifts received in Feb- College ; V. Pres.. and Ed. Sec'y, Grace Bos- 
ruary have undoubtedly had their effect. serman from Elizabethtown College. 
For example, a Pennsylvania congregation Ora Huston, the retiring president, is asked 
gave a smaller Conference offering than last to make the traveling secretary visit to the 
year. However, they sent $300.00 last Feb- schools next year. In cooperation with the 
ruary, which would normally have been kept Missions Department at Bethany Bible 
by them until the Conference offering. The School, he has been making a study of the 
second factor is the economic condition of trend in the United Student Volunteer Move- 
the country affecting many people. Nearly ment. As a result of his. report to the Gen- 
all expressed the conviction that our mis- eral Mission Board the following resolution 
sionary work should not suffer and during was passed : 

the remainder of the year the churches "The General • Mission Board encourages 
should do their best to do as well as in previ- the volunteers to continue their movement in 
ous years. recruiting home and foreign workers and 
The Council of Women presented to the developing missionary attitudes on the 
women's meeting the work being done in the campus and in the churches." 
girls' schools of our foreign mission fields, A reduction in the budget of $311,000 to 
which will cost approximately $15,000.00 next $296,000 for the year which began March 1, 
year. The women voted to make this their 1930, was proposed by the Council of Boards 
missionary project, and not only the Aid to the Conference. This recommendation 
Societies but all women's groups will be in- was adopted and at the same time Bethany 
vited to participate in this enterprise. Bible School, which is now owned and con- 
New missionaries were approved as fol- trolled by the church, was placed in the 
lows : For Africa, Desmond and Irene Conference Budget for the remaining nine 
Frantz Bittinger, Harold A. and Gladys H. months of the fiscal year, closing February 
Royer, Evelyn J. Horn, R. N., and Ruth E. 28, 1931. The amount for Bethany stands at 
Utz, R. N. For India, Amsey F. and Flor- ^23,333, making a total Conference Budget 
ence M. Bollinger. In addition to these Em- of $319,333. For the year beginning March 1, 
ma K. Ziegler and Faye Moyer were also ap- 1931, the Conference Budget was approved as 
proved for India with the understanding that follows : 

only one of them is to sail this year. No General Mission Board $261,905.00 

new missionaries were approved for China. Board of Religious Education 21,500.00 

The pictures and biographies of these new General Ministerial Board 8,095.00 

workers will appear later, probably in the General Education 4,762.00 

October Visitor. Bible Society 476.00 

Missionaries on furlough, present at Con- Bethany Bible School 35,000.00 

ference, included : From Sweden, J. F. Gray- 

bill; from Africa, Dr. Homer L. and Mar- $331,738.00 

guerite Burke and Albert D. and Lola Hel- H. Spenser Minnich. 



July 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



275 



Swept In by the Tide 



Evangelistic Opportunity in China 

Dr. Sherwood Eddy who has been touring 
the Far East presenting the claims of Chris- 
tianity before student groups and others, has 
had an unusual hearing in China. Reports of 
his meetings in college institutions in South 
and East China indicate that religiously 
there is an open door to an extent that has 
not been true in recent years. Although 
there is cynicism and atheism among student 
groups he has been accorded an interested 
hearing and been given a response that was 
beyond expectation. In view of the fact that 
within three years Christianity has been bit- 
terly opposed as an agent of imperialism and 
superstition it is worthy of note that now 
there seems to be a genuine opportunity for 
reasonable, yet fearless, evangelism. — Foreign 
Missions Conference News. 

China Calls for Missionary Help 

The Canton Missionary Conference, repre- 
senting missionaries belonging to American, 
British and German missions, listened re- 
cently to an address by Dr. C. Y. Cheng on 
"The Forward Looking Church." Dr. Cheng 
is moderator of the Church of Christ in 
China (the recently organized United Church 
which has about one third of the total Prot- 
estant communicants in membership) and 
general secretary of the National Christian 
Council of China. Dr. Cheng especially re- 
quested the missionaries to make articulate 
the voice of the Chinese church in seeking 
for more missionary helpers. The Confer- 
ence, therefore, adopted the following reso- 
lution : 

"That we, as a Missionary Conference, ap- 
peal to our home constituencies and to the 
youth of our home lands for the continued 
and increased cooperative support of the 
Christian movement in China. 

"The call from China is for men and wom- 
en who are willing to work with the Chinese 
as fellow workers. They should be men and 
women of large vision and spiritual power. 
The problems that will confront them may 
be great but the challenge is to the big, brave 
souls who wish to make a contribution to 
the greatest potential Christian adventure of 



todaj', and themselves to grow, by varied ex- 
periences, into spiritual greatness." — Foreign 
Missions Conference News. 

" Tune Award for New 
Missionary Hymn " 

The prize of $100 for the best musical set- 
ting for the new missionary hymn, "Eternal 
God, Whose Power Upholds," written by 
Prof. Henry Hallam Tweedy, of Yale, was 
won by Rhys Thomas, a well-known com- 
poser of Cricklewood, London, England, 
President Benjamin S. Winchester of the 
Hymn Society has recently announced. 
( Mr. Thomas' tune, "Sarah," was selected 
from 1,300 tunes submitted. The composi- 
tions came from almost every state in the 
union, from every province in Canada, from 
England, Irish Free State, Ulster, Scotland, 
Japan, China, Siam, India, Assam, Malay 
States, Venezuela, France and Hawaii. 

The Kingdom of God Movement 
in Japan 

Rev. Akira Ebisawa, general secretary of 
the National Christian Council of Japan, 
writes in the following enthusiastic vein re- 
garding the progress of the Kingdom of God 
Movement in Japan : 

"God is doing wonderful work among us 
these days. Sixty district committees are 
already organized and we have held meet- 
ings in forty places during this three months. 
We shall further press forward to help or- 
ganize the local committees and are expect- 
ing the organization will practically cover 
all the country before summer. Now we feel 
the campaign has well taken root, and we 
trust that God will use this wonderful oppor- 
tunity to spread his kingdom in this nation. 
It is really encouraging to see almost all the 
churches united in this campaign as never 
before, and our ambition to mobilize all the 
Christian forces and agencies in this cam- 
paign now seems practicable. We increas- 
ingly realize that God has his own plan to 
Christianize this country. So we 'expect 
great things from God and attempt great 
things for God,' as Wm. Carey put it," 



276 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 

iyjo 



Is Your Belief in Missions 
Weakening? 

Read what L. A. Blickenstaff writes from 
v Bulsar, India 

"Are you really making any progress over 
there?" "Are you getting anywhere?" "Is 
not that task a hopeless one?" Not only are 
these the questions of some who are hunting 
around for an excuse to discontinue support 
of the missionary project, but in unguarded 
moments a shadow of a doubt arises in the 
mind of the missionary himself. Then comes 
the answer on a post card from Elder N. V. 
Solanky, thus : 

"I was at Wankal (Boys' Boarding School) 
Sunday (April 6). Every teacher was pres- 
ent .... I took the Sunday morning service. 
Twenty boys were baptized." 

That is all Elder Solanky said about it. 
Some years ago there would have been a 
great deal more to say ! In truth it could 
have been like this : 

"I was at Wankal last Sunday, and a boy 
insisted on being baptized. I baptized him, 
and I am so sorry to tell you that all the 
boys have run away from school to their 
homes. What shall we do?" 

That is just what happened at Wankal 
about 15 years ago when Elder A. W. Ross, 
of sainted memory, established with life 
blood the Wankal Boarding School, and bap- 
tized the first boy. Now, the elder in charge 
can report in three lines on a post* card the 
baptism of twenty times one boy, and the 
missionary in charge has no hours of weary 
thought as to the outcome ; there is only re- 
joicing of heart for the reaping of a harvest 
from seed sown years ago by hands that 
were ready and efficient for the Master. 

Why the great change? Those of us on 
the field know and we pass the reason on to 
you. We are really making progress over 
here ! We are getting somewhere ! The task 
is not a hopeless one ! 

Mission Heart Throbs Continued 

"I send you $2.00 for mission work. I am 
not able to earn much by quilting and doing 
things like that. I have walked on crutches 
fourteen years, but I do a little and have 
been a church member for fifty-five years." 

"I will send my mite for missions. I am 
sorry it is not more. I earned it ironing cur- 



THE MISSIONARY VISITOR 

Published Monthly by the Church of the 
Brethren through her General Mission Board. 

H. Spenser Minnich, Editor 
Mrs. Ada Miller Arnold, Assistant Editor 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE IS $1.00 PER YEAR 

The subscription price is included in EACH dona- 
tion of four dollars or more to the General Mission 
Board, either direct or through any congregational 
collection, provided the four dollars or more are given 
by one individual and in no way combined with 
another's gift. Different members of the same family 
may each give four dollars or more and extra sub- 
scriptions, thus secured, may upon request be sent 
to persons who they know will be interested in read- 
ing the Visitor. NO VISITOR SUBSCRIPTIONS 
ARE ENTERED UNLESS REQUESTED. 

Kindly notice, however, that these subscription 
terms do not include a subscription for every four 
dollar donation, but a subscription for each donation 
of four dollars or more, no matter how large the 
donation. 

Address all communications regarding subscriptions 
and make remittances payable to GENERAL MIS- 
SION BOARD, 22 S. STATE ST., ELGIN, ILL. 

Entered as second class matter at the postoffice at 
Elgin, Illinois. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage 
provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized Aug. 20, 1918. 

Membership 

OTHO WINGER, North Manchester, Ind., 1912-1933. 

J. J. YODER, McPherson, Kans., 1908-1934. 

H. H. NYE, Elizabethtown, Pa., 1923-1932. 

J. B. EMMERT, La Verne, Calif., 1924-1931. 

LEVI GARST, Salem, Va., R. R. 1, 192S-1930. 

J. K. MILLER, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1928-1933. 

L. C. MOOMAW, Roanoke, Va., R. R. 2, 1928-1932. 

Officers 

OTHO WINGER, President, 1912-1933. 
J. J. YODER, Vice-President, 1908-1934. 
CHARLES D. BONSACK, General Secretary, 1921. # 
H. SPENSER MINNICH, Assistant Secretary and 

Editor Missionary Visitor, 1918. 
M. R. ZIGLER, Home Mission Secretary, 1919. 
CLYDE M. CULP, Treasurer, 1920. 



Note. — The bold type date indicates the year when 
Board Members were first elected, the other date the 
year when Board Members' terms expire. 

* Although Bro. Bonsack was not elected secretary 
until 1921 he has been connected with the Board 
since 1906. 



tains. I am an old lady seventy-one years 
old and thankful that my Heavenly Father 
sent me the work so I can give." 



Joy in Giving 



A sister writes : "I want to assure you that 
I appreciate the privilege of giving to ad- 
vance the cause of Christ. I want to assure 
you also that giving a portion of each pay 
check is a part of the pleasure of getting it." 



July 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



277 



One Hundred Famine Boys 

MINOR M. MYERS* 



O 



NE Sunday morning three auto trucks 
drove through the big city gates of 
Taiyuan and stopped in front of the 
Y. M. C. A. What was the load of freight 
they were carrying? Sixty famine boys. 
Where did they come from? Sianfu, capital 
of Shensi, our neighboring province. Three 
days later forty-two more boys arrived. Why 
did they come to Taiyuan? Well, that is 
what I want to tell you about. 

All of you have heard or read of the ter- 
rible famine in northwest China. Our prov- 
ince, Shansi, is in that section but only sev- 
eral counties were severely affected. Owing 
to the good government of this province, 
fairly good transportation facilities, and the 
money raised locally and sent in from the 
outside, the situation is being well taken care 
of. There has been grain in adjoining coun- 
ties to spare if the people have money to buy 



'Missionary, Shansi, China. 



it, and it is not much more expensive than 
in other parts of China. But you see the 
poor people here have no money in the sav- 
ings bank, in fact it is a struggle every year 
to live, even when crops are good, and when 
their crops fail they have nothing to eat and 
no money with which to buy food. 

But over in Shensi where the famine was 
terrible in the extreme, they had neither 
good government nor extra grain in many 
adjoining counties, and no means of cheap or 
quick transportation. No railroad runs into 
the province and only one road which autos 
can use. So it is easy to understand why it 
is difficult to get sufficient food supplies to 
the thousands of needy people. Hauling 
grain on animals for long distances is slow 
and expensive. 

Here in Taiyuan a small group of inter- 
ested people, nearly all Chinese Christians, 
desired to help their suffering neighbors and 
wondered how they could make their limited 




Photo by Minor M. Myers. r . 

ONE HUNDRED FAMINE BOYS from Sianfu, brought in auto trucks to the city of Taiyuan j 
'here one of our mission stations is located. Here the boys are being cared for bv Chinese | 



Christians. 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 
1930 



funds count for the most. To send money- 
over there to add a few days' life to a large 
number, then leave them to die, was not 
worth the while, some said. It seemed wiser 
to care for a smaller number over the entire 
famine period. But food in that section was 
six times the price here because transporta- 
tion was slow and expensive, so for the rea- 
sons stated it was decided to bring a number 
of children over here and keep them until the 
fall harvest. One hundred and two boys be- 
tween eight and nineteen years of age were 
brought, the larger ones to be given employ- 
ment as apprentices if it could be found. The 
government rendered valuable assistance in 
giving free transportation for about three 
hundred and fifty miles, from the border of 
the province, on its trucks which were re- 
turning to Taiyuan empty. 

Some of these boys were in orphanages un- 
der Christian supervision for some time while 
others were in refugee camps only a short 
period. It was heart-rendering to see them 



and hear them tell their sad stories of how 
their parents had starved to death. Some of 
them had been begging before they were 
taken into the camp. Naturally some of them 
were poorly clad, with torn and tattered 
clothes. And a number were undernourished. 
While this little organization is only a tem- 
porary one, it is trying to help during this 
particular stressing time. Some friends from 
the outside have sent us money, even a few 
from America, which has increased our fund 
and the service we can render. It is all 
appreciated. There is no attempt to furnish 
these boys the best for there are others who 
need help too. Their food is very simple but 
they can get along on it very well. Except 
one meal on Sunday their food consists of 
millet with a little vegetable of some kind to 
eat with it. We Americans would find that 
kind of food day after day unbearable. But 
many Chinese live largely on millet when 
(Continued on Page 302) 



Fourteen Points on Foreign Missions 

1 . Every book in the New Testament was written by a foreign missionary. 

2. Every letter in the New Testament that was written to an individual was 
written to a convert of a foreign missionary. 

3. Every epistle in the New Testament that was written to a church was writ- 
ten to a foreign missionary church. 

4. Every book in the New Testament that was written to a community of be- 
lievers was written to a general group of foreign missionary churches. 

5. The one book of prophecy in the New Testament was written to the seven 
foreign missionary churches in Asia. 

6. The only authoritative history of the early Christian Church is a foreign 
missionary journal. 

7. The disciples were called Christians first in a foreign missionary community. 

8. The language of the books of the New Testament is the missionary 
language. 

9. The map of the early Christian world is the tracing of the journeys of the 
first missionaries. 

1 0. Of the twelve apostles chosen by Jesus, every apostle except one became a 

missionary. 
1 1 . The only man among the twelve apostles who did not become a missionary 

became a traitor. 
12. The problems which arose in the early Church were largely questions of 

missionary procedure. 
1 3. Only a foreign missionary could write an everlasting gospel. 
1 4. According to the apostles, missionary service is the highest expression of 

Christian life. 

— William Adams Brown. 



July 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



279 



News from the Fields 



INDIA 

Alice K. Ebey 

Gandhi's Walking Tour 
Toward Bombay 

"We won't pay the salt tax," is the hue 
and cry raised by the Gandhi party. The 
only way to keep from paying the salt tax 
is to quit eating the salt sold by shop-keep- 
ers and venders, for the salt manufacturers 
pay the revenue before the salt is put on the 
market. Last month Mr. Gandhi left his 
ashram where he had his school and started 
on a walking tour toward Bombay, a dis- 
tance of about three hundred miles. New 
disciples joined the walking party at many 
villages where he stopped. At the sea near 
Jalalpor they tarried for some days to make 
salt from the sea-water, and then the people 
could eat untaxed salt. All this, according 
to Mr. Gandhi's instructions, is to be done 
quietly. "Non-violence, non-cooperation," is 
still the watch-word of his propaganda. But 
when blood, especially young blood, is heated 
with passion it is not soon cooled. The lead- 
er's instructions are often disregarded. In 
Bombay and other large centers men with 
laths have come into collision with the po- 
lice and present indications point to more 
strife and unrest lying just ahead. Mr. 
Gandhi is now hastening to Bombay to quiet 
the people and to do his utmost to prevent 
bloodshed. 

Lives Taken by Influenza; 
Fears of Fate 

"Our old tailor died last night." "The cop- 
persmith, father of those seven girls who 
come to the bungalow often, just now died. 
His poor wife! What will she do? No son, 
no brother, no one at all !" 

Such are the snatches of news that come 
to us daily just now. Influenza is taking its 
toll of lives. As we go from village to vil- 
lage and from house to house we see and 
hear much that testifies of hopeless grief, 
helpless fear, and an apathetic resignation to 
the decrees of karma (fate). 

If there be any lingering doubt about the 
world's need of a divine Savior, such doubt- 
ers ought to be brought face to face with 
those who must endure pain and sorrow, suf- 
fering and death, without a knowledge of 
him who brought life and salvation into the 
world. It is a blessed privilege in times like 
these to whisper to those crushed by the 
weight of sorrow, "God knows ; he loves and 
pities you. He will help you and comfort 
you and show the way to peace and life if 
you will but trust and follow him." 

Fears of Fate vs. 
Hope in Christ 

A few weeks ago influenza also claimed a 



little ten year old son of our Indian Christian 
preacher here in Vada. Grief and tears and 
weeping was the portion of the parents and 
all our church wept with them. A beloved 
child can not leave this world without leav- 
ing behind wounded and bleeding hearts. 

But there is a difference. The father, bow- 
ing his head to the stroke, praises the Father 
and the mother prays that God's will may be 
done in her life. They know the promises 
of Jesus and they believe that their dearly 
loved boy has gone on just a step ahead into 
the mansions that Jesus has prepared for all 
who love him. In just a little while we will 
all be in the presence of Jesus where all is 
peace and joy unspeakable which passeth not 
away. How much better than the Hindu's 
hope ! At best if he renounces the world and 
flesh, he may hope to acquire merit through 
countless rebirths, to at last be absorbed in 
the one great spirit that pervades all. To 
these weary seekers we must bear the mes- 
sage of Jesus who came that they might have 
life and that they might have it more abun- 
dantly. 

Anklesvar 

Sadie J. Miller 

Gandhi Party Marches 
through Anklesvar 

The noted Gandhi walking party went 
through Anklesvar the evening of March 26. 
They followed the macadamized road from 
here to Surat, the next station south, avoid- 
ing several Mohammedan villages on account 
of the hatred between the two communities. 
In several villages our Christians were on the 
route and others came from near-by places 
to see the Swrajists on their famous tour. 
Unlike the Arya Samajists, Gandhi treats 
Christians with respect. 

Religious Sect 

Unfriendly to Christians 

Speaking of the Arya Samajists reminds us 
of the interpretation given this sect by some 
Mohammedans. They said : "Here we call 
them the Ardi Samajists [Ardi meaning ob- 
structors]. They have left no stones un- 
turned to speak ill of and work against both 
Christians and Mohammedans. Rajpipla 
State forbids them entering their territory 
on account of the damage they have done 
to unsettle citizens and cause them to be 
unruly to their masters. Two of this sect 
not long ago went to a village on the border 
line and conducted themselves in such a way 
as to bring the sheriff on the spot. After 
finding them guilty again he proceeded to 
beat them. This enraged the samaj who sent 
a large deputation to the state capital plead- 
ing their case. They got no sympathy and 
we have heard little of them since in Raj- 
pipla State." 



280 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 
1930 



Mohammedans More Friendly 
to Christians 

The occasional interruptions by Arya 
Samajists have brought about some change 
of thought with Mohammedans, many of 
whom formerly mistreated Christians and 
even abused them, especially those in their 
employ. One who was always distant and 
bitter has turned completely. He invites us 
and others to his place, advises the people to 
become Christians and even tells other Mo- 
hammedans to see to it that Christians in 
their employ are given leave to go to wor- 
ship on Sunday. 

Bro. Stover will be pleased to learn that 
the Dadal Patel, in his time so bitter to 
Christians, is one of these friendly Moham- 
medans. Last month fifteen were baptized 
in Dadal and eight in Jitali. Since January 
1, in our touring and work fifty-seven have 
received baptism, for which we praise the 
Lord. 

Love Feasts in Outlying 
Christian Communities 

We made it a rule to hold a love feast at 
each place visited, which has been a means 
of reviving the various Christian communi- 
ties. When we were getting seated for a 
love feast in a new Christian community, this 
only the second time they participated in this 
rite, thirteen came from a village nine miles 
distant and joined in the meeting. They were 
all good singers, which was also a means of 
revival for those new Christians. 

At the examination services the privilege 
of making things right was granted in each 
place. It brought some real heart-searching 
and showed who is who, as well. In one 
place, several who had been on a drunken 
rampage became so ashamed of themselves 
that they stayed away altogether. We trust 
this will be the means of making them see 
the folly of their way so that by another 
time they too can take part. 

Epidemic of Small -pox; 

Gandhi's Views of Vaccination 

It has been some years since small-pox 
carried away as many by death, as this year. 
People seemed never to fear the disease but 
now many who never consented to vaccina- 
tion have taken it. Mr. Gandhi does not be- 
lieve in it ; it comes too near interfering with 
the sacred cow. In his weekly paper he gave 
some remedies for small-pox. In spite of 
this quite a few deaths occurred in his Ash- 
ram, from small-pox. India knows so little 
about segregation that contagion soon gets a 
tremendous hold and is broadcasted. 

Difficulties Locating 
Tents in Villages 

One place where we tented, the village 
patel tried to prevent us from having a place 
in his town. We stayed there three days in 



spite of his failure to welcome us. Two days 
ago we learned that he and two other mem- 
bers of his family sickened and died since we 
were there. The villagers are not at all slow 
to point out that this is a curse because of 
his opposition to those who wanted to do him 
and his village good. 

In some villages we have difficulty finding 
a suitable place so as to have shade for our 
tent. The heat is intense this month and it 
will grow more intense for more than 
another month to come. Our school time al- 
ways has to be adjusted at this time. It 
begins early in the morning and is kept up 
until noon but in the afternoon there is no 
school. From twelve to four o'clock is the 
greatest heat of the day. 

School Examinations; 
Vacation for Pupils 

The examinations for the vernacular final 
boys and girls has just been held. Results 
will not come for a month or six weeks. As 
a rule our students do better than those in 
non-Christian schools and we hope this year 
will be no exception to that rule. 

By May all our schools begin their summer 
vacation of about six weeks. Those who 
have homes go home and many of them are 
able to do worthy witnessing for Christ. 

CHINA 

Tai Yuan 
Report of Visitor 
in Famine Section 

An American friend, just returned from the 
famine section of Shansi, tells of most piti- 
able sights which he saw. How we wish we 
could do more to help them ! 

Marshal Feng's Army; 
Food Shortage 

It is reported that one reason for Marshal 
Feng's army moving out east and south is 
because of food shortage in Shansi and 
Kansu provinces. 

Holiday Declared 

in Honor or" Marshal Yen 

On March 29 a big mass meeting was 
staged in Tai Yuan against Chiang Kai Shek, 
head of the Nationalist Government at Nan- 
king. Thousands of people, the majority of 
whom were students, gathered in the city 
park. The military band furnished music, 
airplanes flew low over the city distributing 
literature, and there were several public 
speakers all denouncing Chairman Chiang, 
however, upholding the political party, Kuo- 
mingtang, and principles of the late Dr. Sun 
Yat Sen. Strong epithets and pronounce- 
ments against Chairman Chiang were made. 
Huge posters and cartoons were posted on 
the walls and billboards. Our governor, Mar- 



July 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



281 



shal Yen, received his good share of praise. 
Then the following Tuesday a holiday was 
declared in honor of his accepting that day 
the office of commander-in-chief of naval, 
air and military forces of China. This took 
place on April 1. Could there be any signif- 
icance to the date? 

Shou Yang 

Frances S. Smith 
First Anointing 
at Shou Yang 

Sister Li Kai Mei has been sick with tu- 
berculosis for several years. She was anoint- 
ed March 18, and seems to show a marked 
improvement. It is the first case of anoint- 
ing in the Shou Yang church. We are much 
concerned that the will of the Lord may be 
done in this case. Sister Li is an educated 
girl and very consecrated in Christian serv- 
ice. Her husband's brother is' a pre-Boxer 
Christian. It is almost like a spiritual oasis 
in a religious desert to visit in this home. 

Idols and Images 

Destroyed at Yu Hsien 

Miss Cripe reports that the work at Yu 
Hsien is going forward in quite a promising 
manner. She is getting her living quarters 
fixed up quite comfortably, and already has 
quite a hearty welcome in a number of the 
homes of the city. Just before the Chinese 
New Year the city magistrate emptied the 
city temples of their idols and hauled the 
broken images outside the city and dumped 
them into the river. Many of the poor peo- 
ple were heartbroken to see their idols, which 
their ancestors had worshiped for hundreds 
of years, thus dealt with. Some gathered up 
a few of the pieces that they could get hold 
of and carried them home to worship them. 
Others started to set up little shrines by the 
river to pay homage to them. It is pathetic 
to see their feeling of helplessness as they 
say, "Now, what can we do?" It is a great 
opportunity to tell them of Jehovah, if their 
experience does not tend to make them athe- 
istic. But in any event it takes time to make 
the transition. Some say that now they 
know they were false gods, because no 
calamity came out of this rough treatment of 
them. 

Drought-Resisting Corn 
Being Introduced in China 

Mr. Wang, the local evangelist at Yu 
Hsien, has recently been out among the 
farmers of the district trying to get them in- 
terested in a drought-resisting kind of Egyp- 
tian corn, which the International Famine 
Relief Committee is trying to introduce into 
the famine districts of China. Although we 
have no famine here at present, oftentimes 
there is suffering because of lack of rain. 
All the Famine Relief Committee asks is that 
they make a report of their first year's crop 



and if it is a good one to return the amount 
of seed they received this spring. Many hes- 
itate to try it, which is their attitude gener- 
ally toward any new thing. Our Christian 
farmers take up with it more readily. 

Liao Chou 

Ruth Ulery 

Awaiting Government Report 

Concerning Registration of Schools 

The registration of our schools is still a 
big problem. The local educational board 
which was appointed during the Chinese- 
foreign annual meeting the past month, has 
been quite busy getting things in shape to 
send to the provincial educational board, 
asking for registration. The request has 
been sent in and all are eagerly awaiting the 
returns — but none more eagerly than the pu- 
pils and teachers who are most directly af- 
fected. Unless we register, the pupils must 
leave our schools and go to government 
schools. Some are a bit fearful that the 
educational board may turn us down ; be- 
cause they feel that some mission schools 
which have already registered are proving 
untrue to the government rules and regula- 
tions. At times like these we cannot afford 
to betray the government's trust in us. 

Young Woman Manifests 
Strong Christian Faith 

Last month we wrote that one of the 
teachers who taught in the girls' school last 
year was very low with tuberculosis. Yester- 
day the reaper of death claimed her as his 
own. She had been ill for over a year, and 
bedfast for over two months. Pearl Yin was 
a young woman of seventeen summers. She 
had a faith in Christ that was surprising in 
one so young. She was the hope and pride 
of her mother, whose grief is almost more 
than she can bear. 

Sunday noon as a couple of friends called 
in Pearl's home, she was found to be in the 
agonies of death. As one sat by her side and 
heard her talk, it was evident that she knew 
her Savior and was eager to go to him. She 
prayed the Father to receive her spirit ; and 
then turned to us and asked us to comfort 
her mother. Her spirit is now with the one 
who gave it ; and what a tribute to Jesus' 
power to save. While still in the schoolroom, 
she said on one occasion, "If deep and severe 
trials come, where it may mean giving my 
life or denying my Lord, I don't know 
whether my strength is sufficient or not. At 
times I think it is, at other times I doubt it." 
But her looking to her Savior and her trust 
in him at the last is its own beautiful an- 
swer. Truly it is blessed to die in the Lord. 
Many in her home do not know their Savior. 
Pray that her death may draw them to him, 
the true and living God, 



282 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 
1930 



Ping Ting 

Emma Horning 

Cooperation between 

Men and Women in China 

This week the men and women have been 
holding their mid-week prayer meeting to- 
gether once a month, discussing and praying 
about the problems in the homes that men 
and women must work out together. We had 
such subjects as methods of teaching chil- 
dren in the homes, and what should be 
taught in the homes to make good Chris- 
tians, also how parents and men and women 
in general should work together for the 
training of children and the good of society. 
You see there has been very little coopera- 
tion of any kind between men and women in 
China. Such cooperation in the past seemed 
to tend towards immorality and hence was 
avoided. It is the church that must show the 
possibility of such cooperation in a spiritual 
atmosphere, and it must begin the practice 
in the church as well as in the homes. Mixed 
prayer meetings, committee meetings and so- 
cials are a beginning. Men and women sel- 
dom eat together even in the homes and it is 
only recently that we have had any coedu- 
cational schools. 

Class for Women and Girls 
in Outlying Village 

The "ten village campaign" has taken a 
step forward. We are having a month of 
class work in one of these villages. They 
have never had a girls' school here and none 
of the women or girls can read. The head 
man of the village had a room fixed up in his 
own court for our use without any expense 
on our part. He called together over a dozen 
girls and young women. It took much per- 
suasion on his part to get the movement 
started, but since the class is started they 
come regularly forenoon and afternoon and 
enjoy it very much. Of course it was the 
parents who were slow in their decision. 
The young people are eager for anything 
new. Now some of the parents are as much 
interested as the girls and some come every 
day to listen to the stories and songs. We 
are teaching the first of the Thousand Char- 
acter books which are very popular now. 
After reading four of these books they are 
acquainted with a thousand of the most im- 
portant characters of this difficult language. 
Besides learning to read and write the char- 
acters, the girls are taught Bible stories and 
hymns, hygiene and hand work. They are 
being taught to crochet so they can make 
their caps, mittens, and shoes for winter 
wear. There are no Christians in this vil- 
lage but we have been holding meetings in 
the homes twice a month now for over a 
year and this is the result. Mrs. Hsun is do- 
ing most of the teaching. 



Eight-Hour Day 

Adopted in Cotton Mills 

The Tientsin cotton mills have adopted an 
eight-hour day instead of their former 
twelve-hour day. There are 1,600 workers in- 
volved. Thirty per cent are women and ten 
per cent are children! The day has now 
been divided into three shifts of eight hours 
each. 

Modern and Ancient 
Vehicles in Nanking 

Two years ago Chang Kai Shek bought 
the first auto in Nanking. Now there are 
1,359 in the city of all sizes and works, and 
more are arriving daily. Besides the autos 
there are 525 horse carriages, 9,707 rikshaws, 
3,189 bicycles, 2,517 wheelbarrows, 514 wag- 
ons, and 69 water carts. Imagine this array 
of modern and ancient vehicles, together 
with thousands of people pushing through 
these streets at the same time, for there are 
few sidewalks in China. 

South China; Sunning District 

Elizabeth Postma 

Bible Study Class; 
Love Feast 

A Bible study class was conducted for 
three days with an average attendance of 
twenty-five. A number of Christians from 
the various chapels in the district attended 
and were much interested in the discussions. 
A half hour was spent each day in interces- 
sory prayer and two hours in Bible study. 
Bro. Moy Gwong and Sister Shick directed 
the teaching. On Sunday following, four- 
teen members enjoyed a love feast, the nine 
new members being especially appreciative 
of this fellowship. 

Largest Enrollment in 
History of School 

A very successful school year closed the 
middle of January. Two girls finished the 
work and were granted diplomas. The new 
year opened with the highest enrollment in 
the history of the school— 135 having enrolled 
up to date. Work is progressing nicely with 
twenty-three in the upper primary. 

Daily Vacation Bible 
School Planned 

The Daily Vacation Bible School will open 
the middle of July and be in session four 
weeks. The number of pupils to be enrolled 
has been limited to 140 because of lack of 
room. 

A Visit with Bro. Wong 
of Shantung University 

A few weeks ago we made a visit to Bro. 
Joseph Wong's home, a few miles beyond 
Sunning City. Bro. Wong became a member 
of the Church of the Brethren while in 



July 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



283 



California. He is now taking a medical 
course at Shantung University, preparing for 
definite Christian service among the people 
in his native district. The people welcomed 
us for Bro. Wong's sake and are very proud 
of him even though he is a zealous Christian. 
Much interest was manifested in the church 
service. Following the service we were in- 
vited to visit their large village school. The 
principal assembled the more than 200 pupils 
of whom about seventy were girls. Bro. Moy 
delivered a strong Gospel sermon. Sister 
Shick followed with a short talk. During the 
entire time the children were all standing at 
attention and were perfectly quiet and or- 
derly. 

AFRICA 

Esther E. Beahm 

Governor of Nigeria 

Visits Our Africa Mission 

For months we at Garkida had looked for- 
ward to the visit of the Governor of Nigeria, 
Sir Graeme Thomson. His visit is now his- 
tory. After he had visited the school one of 
the boys asked if he is as big a man as the 
King of England. And then he asked if he 
is as big as Brethren Emmert and Bonsack. 
They have great respect for our Brethren. 
We try to help them respect their govern- 
ment officials as well. Our mission was 
granted a conference with His Excellency, 
the Governor, who seemed ready to help us. 
We very soon obtained permission for our 
doctor to travel in West Buraland and for a 



party to look for a medical site in that area 
where we are so much needed. 

Lassa Missionaries 
Visit Garkida 

We enjoyed a short visit from the Lassa 
missionaries while the Governor was here. 
Elnora Schechter moved to Lassa when the 
others returned to that station. 

Prospects for a Station 
in West Bura 

Shortly after the Governor's visit Doctor 
Robertson and William Beahm looked over 
the prospects for a new opening. They were 
much impressed with what they found. A 
station over there could reach almost five 
times as many people as we can in the same 
area around Garkida. 

Clara Harper in Charge of Hospital 
While Dr. Robertson Is Away 

If you happen to pass the Garkida hospital 
some day soon you might wonder who the 
little lady is, who is hurrying hither and yon 
so fast that you can not get a good look at 
her. It is Clara Harper. She always moves 
fast, but just now she is the sole white doc- 
tor as well as nurse and with these added 
duties she hurries even faster. Dr. Robert- 
son and family are taking a much deserved 
vacation. Bertha and Jane Vena are at a 
mission rest house near Jos. The doctor 
plans to visit a leper colony down in South- 
ern Nigeria. 

(Continued on Page 302) 




THY BLESSING, LORD, ON ALL 
VACATION DAYS 

Thy blessing, Lord, on all vacation days ! 
For weary ones who seek the quiet ways, 
Fare forth beyond the thunder of the street, 
The marvel of Emmaus Road repeat ; 
Thy comradeship so graciously bestow 
Their hearts shall burn within them as they 

go. 
Grant those who turn for healing to the sea 
May find the faith that once by Galilee 
Flamed brighter than the glowing fires of 

coals. 
And when thou hast refreshed their hungry 

souls, 
Speak the old words again, beside the deep, 
Bid all who love thee, Master, feed thy sheep ! 
— Molly Anderson Haley. 



284 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 
1930 




Missionary Education in the Primary Department 



First Church, Roanoke, Virginia 
MRS. A. L. WEAVER* 



The Primary Department of First Church, 
Roanoke, Virginia, has been intensely inter- 
ested in our missions as a result of special 
emphasis given them in our Sunday morning 
worship services, beginning with the first 
Sunday of this year. 

Several Sundays were spent studying mis- 
sions generally with the aid of Copping's 
famous painting, "The Hope of the World," 
appropriate stories and a large world-wide 
mission poster. 

About a month was devoted to Africa. The 
climate, crops, food, clothing and customs 
were studied. An African village was built, 
with a tropical poster for a background. A 
prayer list was made of the children of our 
Africa missionaries and each Sunday each 
child received the name of a new friend for 
whom to pray during the week. A number 
of pupils in this way became familiar with 
the names of our workers on the field. 

The pictures of our Africa missionaries 
appearing in The Missionary Visitor were 
mounted on a poster and displayed. These 
were often referred to during this study. All 
African pictures obtainable were mounted in 
a book and used before the Sunday-school 
hour, in the class rooms and in the worship 
program. 

Special self-denial offerings were made for 
several Sundays previous to our "missionary 
Sunday" which together with our special of- 
fering for the deficit on that day amounted 
to $25.01. 

After Easter we plan to begin a similar 1 
study of India. Our immense book of India 
mission pictures is completed and waiting to 
be used. The poster with our workers there 
is also completed and the prayer list is being 



^Superintendent of Primary Department. 



arranged. In fact our Africa study was so 
pleasant that we plan to follow about the 
same course with India and China. 

We hope to make impressions so favorable 
to missions that many of these children will 
grow up really eager to sacrifice for the 
cause which many of us older ones have 
failed to support as though we had faith in 
it. 

We trust that our children throughout the 
Brotherhood may receive such lasting im- 
pressions concerning the place our missions 
should occupy in our church program that 
they need never be embarrassed by the re- 
currence of an unfortunate situation such as 
we met recently. True, because of it, some 
of us may have been aroused to more gen- 
erous giving than heretofore, but would it 
not be possible by intensive education from 
childhood to stimulate an interest which 
would result in gradually increased offerings 
of money, lives and prayers from year to 
year, thus making our mission work more 
definite and secure? 

We cannot convert the world with the 
Bible alone. It must be translated into life, 
and interpreted thereby. — Prof. Oscar Buck. 

MY TRUST 

Lord, thou hast giv'n to me a trust, 

A high and holy dispensation, 
To tell the world, and tell I must, 

The story of thy great salvation ; 
Thou might'st have sent from heav'n above 

Angelic hosts to tell the story, 
But in thy condescending love, 

On men thou hast conferred the glory. 

—A. B. Simpson. 



July 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



285 



A Unique Mission Study Class 



One very hot clay last summer, I went 
downtown in the subway, planning to take a 
ferry to Staten Island to try to find a breeze. 
Oblivious of my fellow travelers, I was read- 
ing one of the study books, "Friends of 
Africa," by Miss Jean Mackenzie. 

Engrossed as I was in the book, I suddenly 
realized that the person next to me was try- 
ing to see what I was reading. Turning in 
my seat, 'I saw a coarse, untidy, rather elder- 
ly woman, but who evidently was quite curi- 
ous, so I slanted the book toward her and 
asked if she had read it. 

Startled a bit, she said, "Oh, no, but I know 
Miss Jean Mackenzie who is a missionary in 
Africa, and I see that book is about that 
country." 

"Miss Mackenzie is the writer of this 
book," I said. "Where did you meet her?" 

"I did not know Miss Jean wrote books," 
she responded. "I used to be a scrub woman 
in the Presbyterian Building, and many times 
when Miss Jean would be working late, she 
would speak to me in the hall. You may 
not know, lady, that scrub women start their 
cleaning after the workers leave, so not 
many people know anything about us." 

By this time I did not care if I ever 
reached the ferry. This woman had made 
such an impression on me that I wanted to 
draw her out a little more, if I could. In 
response to questions, she told me she was 
on her way to the lower end of Manhattan to 
meet six companions who made up her squad, 
to start their nightly cleaning task, which 
began about six and ended after midnight. 

I wonder if we ever stop to think who 
cleans up our offices after we leave them, 
many times littered with bits of paper! Yet 
here was a woman, eager to know something 
about a country very far away because some 
one who was never too much in a hurry to 
leave her office had found time for a cheer- 
ful word for the scrub woman. 

Naturally, I asked if she would care to 
read the book. "I'd like to," she replied, "but 
I haven't much time for reading and my eyes 
don't see fine print very well." (I found out 
that she was seventy-two years old.) 

I asked her a few more questions, and our 
conversation went on to church affairs and 
missionary lines. 

"1 used to go to church," she said, "but 



they only want your money, and I had none 
to give, so I stopped going. Nobody cares 
for the likes of us, anyway. Most people 
don't even know who scrub women are." 

"How would you like to get several of your 
friends, perhaps those who work with you, to 
come to my house, and I will tell you this 
story, and we will discuss the work Miss 
Mackenzie did in Africa?" I asked on a sud- 
den thought. 

"Say, that would be awful nice, if you 
want to bother with us ! When can we 
come? Where do you live?" The sugges- 
tion had met with instant approval. 

Being one of those few fortunate mortals 
who live in the upper part of New York City 
where there are still houses instead of apart- 
ments, I knew I could have a class on my 
porch. I suggested a certain day in the fol- 
lowing week, at two o'clock. I gave her my 
name and address, but I did not ask her to 
give me her name. 

I really thought that would be the end of 
the whole matter. But on the following 
Tuesday, a few minutes before two, I heard 
my gate click, and glancing out from my up- 
stairs window, I saw my subway friend and 
six other women coming up the path. I hur- 
ried down to make them welcome, carrying 
out a few more chairs and several copies of 
"Friends of Africa," which I had secured the 
day before. 

The outcome was a very fine mission study 
class, lasting for three weeks. They wanted 
to come every afternoon, but I could not 
have them so frequently, as I was not well. 
Of the group two were Jews, two were Ro- 
man Catholics, and three Protestants, one of 
the latter being a Presbyterian. 

At our last session, as the afternoon drew 
to a close, I could see that they wanted to 
say something but did not know how to begin. 
Finally, one plucked up courage and said, 
"You have told us of so many places, not 
only in Africa, but in this country, too, where 
good deeds are done, that we want to give a 
little to help on. Won't you send this en- 
velope to Point Barrow for the little ones? 
We have picked up most of these pennies on 
office floors as we cleaned, and we want 
them to do some good." 

The envelope contained $3.83 in pennies. 1 
took it to Syracuse to the synodical meeting 



286 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 
1930 



and gave it as a thank-offering from those 
poor scrub women, to "do some good." 

If hard working scrub women, whose lives 
have so little pleasure and so much hard la- 
bor, could give time on those hot summer 
days to hear of Christian work in far-off 
Africa, what ought we to expect of those 
who have ample leisure and far wider oppor- 
tunities for service? — Mrs. George T. Hast- 
ings, in Women and Missions. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM FOR WOMEN'S 

MISSIONARY SOCIETIES 
Based on "From Jerusalem to Jerusalem"* 

The Unfinished Task, Chapter 5 

"Christ alone can save the world — 

but Christ can't save the world alone." 

Explanation of the theme, to be given by the leader. 

"No two of you are thinking of the same picture 
as you say to yourself, 'The Unfinished Task.' It 
may be a little child discouraged with her first les- 
son in knitting. It may be the foundation of the 
house abandoned by the builder. Possibly it is a book 
half written or a painting incomplete. Unfinished 
tasks are not discouraging if the process is still 
going on to its ultimate goal. It then means prog- 
ress. Such a one is the study of the month, the 
building of the Kingdom. What has been accom- 
plished gives courage, but a knowledge of the yet 
unoccupied fields and the millions unreached by the 
good tidings make us realize that the task is only 
begun. To go forward with renewed vigor and deter- 
mination must be our aim. 'To falter would be sin.' 
The duty and privilege of each one of us is to do our 
part, to do our best and leave the rest to him of 
whose kingdom we are the subjects." — The Olive 
Branch. 
Devotions 

Hymn : "Jesus Shall Reign." 

Scripture : Report of the Spies, Numbers 
13 : 17-21 ; 26-33 ; John 4 : 35. 

Prayer : For the nations that have not yet 
heard the Gospel, for the Moslems, Indians, 
and Jews. 

Hymn: "We've a Story to Tell to the 
Nations." 
Chapter Outline 

1. Unoccupied Areas, pp. 163, 164. Point 
out on world map. Make a large chart like 
No. V. 

2. The Moslem World, pp. 166-170. 

3. Indians of South America and Mexico, 
pp. 173-177. 

4. Character sketch of Marcolino. Present 
as dramatically as possible using first person. 
Indian costume might be used. Pp. 178-180. 

5. The Jews, pp. 183-189. The following 
leaflet will be helpful — "Story of Rosy," 
Marcy Center, Maxwell Street, Chicago. 
Price 5c. 



*May be ordered from Brethren Publishing House, 
Elgin, 111. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 50 cents. 



6. Unoccupied Areas of Our Own Hearts, 
pp. 189-193. 

Hymn: "Count Your Many Blessings." 

Prayer: (In Unison) 

"Almighty God, who has commanded us to go 
forth into all the world, preaching the good news of 
salvation through Jesus Christ, grant that we may be, 
obedient to thy word. Bless those who have gone 
forth to labor in thy name, and be pleased so to 
, awaken the conscience of the church that both those 
who go and those who remain at home may be part- 
ners together in bringing the world to faith in Jesus 
Christ. Amen."— Book of Common Prayer. 

Chart V 

Unoccupied Areas 

Tibet— 6 million. 

Nepal— 5 million 

Afghanstan — 4 million. No missionaries. 

Bokhara— 1H million. 

Khiva— 800,000. 

Central Asia— 26 million. Occupation very inade- 
quate. 

Southeast Asia— 21 million. Only a few Catholic 
missionaries. 

Africa— 70 million. Untouched. 

Arabia— 3 million. Untouched. 

"Every element in the missionary problem 
depends for its solution upon prayer." 

MONTHLY FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Conference Offering, 1900. As of May 31, 1930, the 
Conference (budget) offering for the year ending 
February 28, 1931, stands as follows: 
Cash received since March 1, 1930 $20,552.29 

(The 1930 budget of $311,000.00 is 6.6% raised, 
whereas it should be 25%.) 

Mission Board Treasury Statement. The following 
shows the condition of mission finances on May 31, 
1930: 

Income since March 1, 1930 $32,291.17 

Income same period last year 66,114.12 

Expense since March 1, 1930 59,487.46 

Expense same period last year ■ 61,745.43 

Mission surplus May 31. 1930 7,546.37 

Mission surplus April 30, 1930 14,079.74 

Decrease in surplus, May, 1930 6,533.37 

May Receipts. Contributions were received during 
May by funds as follows: 

Total Rec'd 
Receipts Since 3-1-30 

World Wide Missions $1,618.19 $6,343.20 

Student Fellowship Fund— 1929- 

1930 412.00 487.00 

Aid Societies' Mission Fund— 1927 735.76 2,264.41 

Home Missions 25.70 108.66 

Greene County, Virginia, Mission 54.86 89.86 

Foreign Missions 133.85 741.96 

Junior League— 1930 14.15 75.98 

B. Y. P. D.— 1930 37.00 98.00 

Home Missions Share Plan 25.00 39.00 

Challenge Fund 1,602.67 2,102.67 

India Mission 35.74 224.84 

India Boarding School 96.34 207.59 

India Share Plan 262.50 442.50 

India Missionary Supports 460.52 1,171.95 

Vyara Church Building Fund 10.00 110.00 

China Mission 27.10 210.73 

China Native Worker 11.81 64.64 

China Missionary Supports 418.18 760.44 

Sweden Mission 15.00 15.00 

Sweden Missionary Supports 275.00 275.00 

Africa Missionary Supports 1,170.19 2,224.62 

Africa Mission 225.40 549.39 

China Famine Relief 1,631.05 5,282.61 

Conference Budget Donations 1,226.64 1,978.34 

Conference Budget Designated... 34.67 122.44 



July 

1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



287 



mmm ummmm 



A Day with a Missionary Doctor 

IDA METZGER* 



It was Thursday morning and so chilly 
that no one liked to leave his comfortable 
warm house so early in he morning. But 
there was much to do, for the medical motor 
was going to attend a bazaar twenty-five 
miles away. On the day before another 
bazaar had been visited so the medicine sup- 
ply had to be replenished. This was done, 
lunches prepared and the party was off by 
eight o'clock. The air was bracing and the 
jungle trees were so beautifully green that 
all felt inspired for the day's work. There 
were unpleasant clouds of dust each time a 
motor passed, but that did not lessen the en- 
thusiasm of the party — they were out on the 
King's errand. 

About fifteen miles out from Dahanu, a 
man who was watching by the roadside 
beckoned for the motor to stop. The driver 
recognized the man as one whom he had met 
the day. before. This was the father of two 
children whose mother had died the week 
previous to this. The doctor had been in- 
formed of the circumstances and was told 
that the father wished to give his youngest 
child to the mission since he was not able to 
care for him. She had sent a messenger to 
see about it but when the father actually 
came to consider the giving over of the child 
he found the ties of love too strong. Now 
here he was, beckoning us to come for the 
baby. 

The doctor and nurse followed the father 
as he led the way to a little hut some dis- 
tance back from the road. There in an im- 
provised cradle was a lovely three months' 
old baby boy drinking his milk, all unaware 
of the change of circumstances that were to 
surround his life. When his meal was fin- 
ished the doctor took him into her arms and 
he cooed his consent to go along. 

Poor father ! He asked, "Will you never 
let him come back to live with me?" The 




•Missionary doctor, Dahanu, India. 



Photo by Dr. Ida Metzger. 

SHINWAR is happy in the Baby Home at 
Dahanu. 

doctor replied, "He needs to go to school to 
be educated first, then he can make his own 
decision as to where he will spend his future 
life. We will not dictate where he must live." 
In her heart she hoped the day would come 
when of his own desire he would go back to 
his home community to help his own people. 



288 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 
1930 



There was not much time for discussion, for 
a big clay's work lay ahead. Now what 
should be done with the baby while the mo- 
tor went to the bazaar? The least difficult 
thing to do would be to leave him there and 
get him on the return jxmrney. But the fath- 
er had gone through the struggle to give him 
up and was it right to make him go through 
it again? Also, might he not change his 
mind and decide after all to let the child take 
his chances in the village? Besides, the 
hardships of a day in the bazaar would not 
be more uncomfortable to him than many 
other days of his young life had been. 

Seeing the pain in the father's face the 
doctor suggested he should accompany the 
party in the evening and go to see the hos- 
pital where his son would live for some 
months and perhaps his heart would receive 
some comfort. He was told to await the 
party at the roadside if he wished to follow 
the suggestion. 

Now with the addition to the group, the 
journey was resumed. Because of the delay, 
the bazaar was found to be already filled 
with people. Some of the merchants, how- 
ever, were still busy either preparing or eat- 
ing their morning meal. This was only the 
second visit of the touring dispensary to this 
bazaar but already the people knew what 
the grey motor carried and a large number 
came for medicines. Also the motor was sur- 
rounded with curious onlookers. This time 
there was an added curiosity in the motor, 
that was the baby. 

Though the little stranger was welcomed 
into the group, no preparations had been 
made for him. A cheap blanket was pur- 
chased in the bazaar but milk was not to be 
found. The supply of milk that had been 
left from his morning meal was very small 
and this was a matter of real concern. Sev- 
eral attempts to obtain milk had failed. It 
was not yet noon and at least five or six 
hours of work and travel were ahead. 

By noon the patients were cared for, the 
medicine cupboard was closed and the staff 
sought the shelter of a government bungalow 
to enjoy the noon meal. Here the baby 
drank almost all of the remaining milk, so it 
was hoped that for this one time there would 
not be many roadside patients and the home- 
ward journey would end before it was time 
to feed the baby again. But these hopes 
were not to be fulfilled. Only a few miles 



were covered until a large group of patients 
were found at the roadside. 

While the motor was going, the child slept 
soundly, but when it stopped he started howl- 
ing at the top of his voice. Some one asked 
whose child it was. The driver furnished the 
explanation. Interest at once became keen. 
"What are you feeding it?" "He must be 
hungry." That statement could not be de- 
nied. The doctor admitted that he had been 
given rather short rations. Hearing the 
story, a man left the crowd, ran across the 
fields and milked his goat. In a few minutes 
he returned with a small vessel of milk, suffi- 
cient for the remainder of the journey. 

Reaching the point where the child had 
been found in the morning, they expected to 
see the father. No one was in sight. This 
was a disappointment to the doctor ; she 
thought, after all perhaps the father does not 
care so much for the child. But about a mile 
farther down the road sat the father all 
alone, waiting for the motor. No one knows 
why he chose to sit in this lonely spot but 
the guess was ventured that his neighbors 
were criticizing him for giving his child to 
the mission and he did not wish them to 
know that now he was making this trip to 
the hospital too. 

The nurse in charge of the hospital wel- 
comed the little stranger and put him into a 
nice clean cot. The father was given a place 
to spend the night. Very early the next 
morning he was seen standing in the door of 
the ward, looking toward the little cot where 
the child was crying for its morning meal. 
He thought he should take the child back to 
the jungle but he was reassured that the 
child would soon become accustomed to his 
new surroundings and be very happy. 

This was not altogether a typical day in 
the missionary doctor's work but it was one 
long to be remembered for Shinwar is a real 
treasure and one that becomes no less at- 
tractive as he grows older. He is happy in 
the baby home and we hope he will grow up 
to be a strong Christian character, fired with 
a desire to serve and to help bring his peo- 
ple to the feet of the Master. 

"If Jesus Christ be in your heart you must 
do one of two things with him — give him 
away or give him up." 



July 
1930 



The Missionary Visitor 



289 



Missionary Worship Program for Juniors 

To Be Used in Connection with the Junior Missionary Project 
MAUD NEWCOMER* 



Call to Worship (by leader) : 

"Let the glory of the Lord endure forever, 
Let Jehovah rejoice in his works ; 
He watereth the mountains from his cham- 
bers : 
The earth is filled with the fruit of thy 

works. . 
He causeth the grass to grow for the cat- 
tle, 
And herb for the service of man.*' 
All in unison : 

"Blessed be Jehovah God . . . 
Who only doeth wondrous things." 
Leader : "And blessed be his glorious name 

forever." 
Children : "And let the whole earth be filled 

with his glory." 
Hymn : "O Worship the Lord." 
Scripture: Psa. 33: 12; Prow 14: 32; Matt. 

28: 19. 
Hymn : "Christ for the World We Sing." 
Unison Prayer : 

Our gracious Master and our God, 

Assist us to proclaim, 
To spread through all the earth abroad, 
The honors of thy name. 



•Assistant Editor, Sunday-school Literature. 



O help us carry far the news 

Of thy dear Son, sent from above, 
To show the world the way of life — 
A way of light, and peace, and love. 
Amen. 
Hymn : "We've a Story to Tell to the Na- 
tions." 
Brief talk by the leader on Christian patriot- 
ism, with a world wide emphasis, noting 
especially the junior project. 
Story : "When the Elephant Came." 
Hymn : "The Whole Wide W T orld for Jesus." 
Offering Service. 

Leader : "God loveth a cheerful giver." 
Children : "Inasmuch as ye did it unto one 
of these my brethren, even these least, ye 
did it unto me." 
Leader : "Whosoever shall give to drink unto 
one of these little ones a cup of cold water 
only, in the name of a disciple, shall in no 
wise lose his reward." 
Children : "It is more blessed to give than to 

receive." 
Prayer : 

Our off'ring to thee we are bringing, 

With gladness we give it today ; 
O may it help others know Jesus, 
And help us to love him, we pray. Amen. 



When the Elephant Came 

GERTRUDE LITTLE 



Evening tide was nigh. The sun was sink- 
ing red behind a patch of clouds, and dusk 
was stealing over the countryside. It was 
hot and steamy, but Kullu. a little Indian 
herdsman, did not mind the weather. He ran 
along through the fields as fast as his legs 
would carry him, glad to have his day's work 
over, thankful to be going to supper. 

He worked every day, that is. every day 
that he was lucky enough to find work. 
Sometimes he helped to hew wood or to till 
the fields; sometimes he would lend a hand 
with the rude wooden crusher which 
squeezed the sweet juice from the sugar 
cane, and set the earthenware jars contain- 
ing it in some cool, dry place, for the syrupy 
liquid to harden into a coarse sort of sugar ; 



but most often he worked with the herds of 
cattle, and it was this that he liked best. 

He loved driving them out in the cool of 
the morning when the dawn was still yellow 
in the sky, and the village half asleep. Dogs 
barked at him as he passed, prowling cats 
slipped out of his way, and here and there 
from an open door there came the smell of a 
peat fire, as some early rising housewife pre- 
pared the first meal of the day. In the after- 
noon he would lie and bask in the strong 
sunshine while the cattle cropped the low- 
scrub round about, and then at sunset he 
would get them together and drive them 
happily towards the village, pleasantly tired 
with the day in the open, and very hungry. 

This evening as he ran he felt very jubi- 



290 



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July 
1930 



lant. The man for whom he worked had 
given him a couple of extra pieces of copper 
money, and money meant a lot to Kullu and 
his grandmother, for they were very poor. 

He clenched it tightly in his fist, and pic- 
tured the joy of the old woman when he 
handed it to her. He remembered with a 
sigh one occasion when he arrived home with 
some most precious fireworks which an 
American boy at the mission station not 
many miles away had given him. His grand- 
mother had looked at the crackers and 
bombs he displayed, and remarked that 
money would have been of more account to 
hungry mouths. 

Kullu, who had meant to startle her with 
an exhibition of the fireworks, had instead 
put them carefully away in a wicker basket 
in a dark corner of the hut, and there they 
were to this day, awaiting a special occasion 
to justify their existence. 

The old woman came to the door when she 
heard his flying footsteps. 

"As well you hasten, my boy," she cried. 
"Rogue elephants are abroad, and I feared 
they might have crossed your path." 

"Would that I had seen them !" exclaimed 
Kullu, wishful of excitement like any boy. 

He sat cross legged on the mud floor near 
the fire, and devoured the bowl of sour milk 
and two hand cakes which were his evening 
meal; then sat drowsily, remembering his 
last visit to the mission. Perhaps it was be- 
cause his eyes sometimes fell upon that bas- 
ket of fireworks that his thoughts took him 
back there. 

He fixed his eyes again on the glowing 
coals, his mind full of the boy who had given 
him the only present he ever remembered 
get-ting in his life. 

There had been a prayer meeting, and 
Kullu had enjoyed it and the music with 
which it had ended. He loved joining in the 
hymns, and sang right lustily. Then the son 
of the mission doctor had followed them all 
out into the compound at the close of the 
service, and called to them to linger. He had 
displayed fireworks, and rushed about enjoy- 
ing himself hugely, while the Indian boy 
marvelled at his spirits, and marvelled still 
more at the crackers which resounded in the 
evening air, and the lights which flashed 
from Roman candles. 

It was magical to him, for he had seen 
nothing of the kind before. Fireworks were 



confined to very special occasions in his poor 
village, and none had been displayed, for 
many years. These were something startling. 

"It is my birthday," confided the Ameri- 
can boy, coming near him, "and that's why 
I'm having them ! Great fun they are !" 

"True talk," agreed Kullu earnestly. "Nev- 
er in my life have I seen anything so beau- 
tiful !" 

The other boy looked at him in surprise, 
then thrust all that were left into his arms. 

"There, you shall have those. We've had 
enough for one evening. Keep them and let 
them off just when you like." 

Would the day — or rather the night — ever 
come when it would not seem a sinful waste 
to burn those treasures? They had lain 
•there three months already, but Kullu felt 
that nothing justified his setting fire to them. 
They must await a special day. 

He began to doze. His grandmother was 
still munching with nearly toothless jaws, 
and still talked, with terror in her tones, of 
the elephants. 

"I have heard of them often," Kullu 
yawned at last, "but have never seen them. 
Does anyone ever see them?" 

"Unbelieving one, be thankful if they do 
not come your way ! As for me, I fear ! I 
fear !" 

"No need, within a hut !" suggested Kullu, 
practically. 

She pointed dramatically to the fragile 
door which hung limply upon its support. 

"Much protection that would be !" she 
cried. "And alas, we are on the outskirts of 
the village !" 

That was true enough, Kullu suddenly 
realized. They were at some distance from 
the other dwelling places,' and if animals 
came at all, it was impossible that help could 
come to them. It was also quite possible that 
that door would not stand the onslaught of 
any animal, let alone an elephant. 

But why worry about it, he thought, boy- 
like. Time enough when such a thing actu- 
ally happened. In the meantime he would 
doze and dream of his fireworks. 

It seemed only a moment later that he was 
awakened. A shrill cry thrilled his ear; then 
a sound like thunder — the trumpeting of an 
angry elephant. 

For a second he pulled the blanket over his 
(Continued on Page 302) 



{$£ The Missionary Visitor . 291 



The 

Record of Giving 

of the 

Church of the Brethren 

For the Year Ended February 28, 1930 

Statistics Arranged by 

Congregations and Church Districts 

General Statistics 




Compiled by the 

COUNCIL OF BOARDS 

Church of the Brethren 
Elgin, Illinois 



MMMM»M»# 



292 



The Missionary Visitor 



July 

1930 



Giving of Individual 
Congregations 

Name of Congregation 

1. Florida & Georgia 

Arcadia $ 6.00 

Brooksville 29.00 

Clay County 20.00 

Glenside 

Lakeland 20.35 

Sebring 647.01 

Seneca 47.58 

Winter Park 12.47 

Zion 99.50 

Unallocated 93.00 

2. North & South Carolina 

Bailey $ 

Brummett Creek 

Flat Rock 90.72 

Golden 10.00 

Green River Cove 

Little Pine 

Melvin Hill 78.61 

Mill Creek 65.00 

Mt. Carmel 13.95 

Mountain View 

New Bethel 

New Haven 

Peak Creek 

Peterson Chapel 

Pigeon River 

Pleasant Grove 1.00 

Pleasant Valley 7.00 

Rowland Creek 3.25 

Spindale 27.78 

Unallocated 46.00 

3. Tennessee 

Bailey Grove $ 

Beaver Creek 20.75 

Bristol 

Cedar Creek 5.00 

Cedar Grove 18.50 

Central Point 4.00 

Cumberland 

Ewing 

French Broad 104.00 

Fruitdale 55.00 

Hawthorne 4.50 

Jackson Park Memorial 20.05 

Johnson City 176.79 

Knob Creek 78.30 

Liberty 8.27 

Limestone 45.20 

Lone Star 

Meadow Branch 53.05 

Midway 14.00 

Mountain Valley 80.10 

New Hope 28.50 

Oneonta 18.08 

Piney Flats 

Pleasant Hill 25.07 

Pleasant Mount 

Pleasant Valley 21.50 

Pleasant View 14.30 

Sweetwater Valley 9.00 

Walnut Grove 14.34 

White Horn 

Wolf Creek 

Unallocated 357.64 

4. Southern Virginia 

Antioch $ 316.18 

Beaver Creek 19.32 

Bethlehem 167.56 

Boone Mill 83.89 

Brick *. 119.66 

Burks Fork 22.60 

Christiansburg 43.57 

Coulson 26.00 

Fraternity 445.00 

Fremont 5.00 

Laurel Branch 36.75 



Maple Grove 

Mt. Hermon 52.31 

Mt. Jackson 1.00 

Pleasant Hill 6.00 

Pleasant Valley 10.00 

Pulaski City 17.00 

Red Oak Grove 49 50 

Schoolfield 27.16 

Shelton 42.18 

Smith River 5.00 

Snow Creek 52.55 

Spray 131.00 

St. Paul 

Texas Chapel 

Topeco 130.02 

Walkers Well 

White Rock 5.00 

Unallocated 52.00 

5. First Virginia 

Antioch $ 19.85 

Cloverdale 885.34 

Copper Hill 81.01 

Crab Orchard 25.00 

Daleville 588.92 

Greenbriar 30.00 

Green Hill 33.27 

Hopewell 1.00 

Jeters Chapel 

Johnsville 14.29 

Lynchburg 125.17 

Monroe 

Mt. Joy 83.50 

Oak Grove 197.51 

Oakvale 

Otter River 12.00 

Peters Creek 296.51 

Pleasant View 217.14 

Poages Mill 51.62 

Roanoke, Central 87.61 

Roanoke, First 1,155.74 

Roanoke, Ninth St 326.98 

Saunders Grove 

Selma 198.53 

Smith Chapel 

Terrace View 15.83 

Tinker Creek 57.16 

Troutville 562.56 

Unallocated 6.00 

6. Eastern Virginia 

Belmont $ 87.47 

Bethel 

Central Plains 

Fairfax 467.57 

Hollywood 64.30 

Locust Grove 37.50 

Madison 36.00 

Manassas 578.53 

Midland 138.05 

Mine Run 

Montebello 

Mt. Carmel 445.04 

Nokesville 326.44 

Oronoco 17.00 

Rapahannock 

Richmond 34.30 

Trevilian 

Valley 146.97 

Unallocated 14.00 

7. Second Virginia 

Barren Ridge $ 931.18 

Beaver Creek 489.43 

Bridgewater 2,393.46 

Buena Vista 15.00 

Chimney Run 23.70 

Concord 

Crummits Run 10.00 

Elk Run 147.16 

Hevener 

Lebanon 685.48 

Middle River 905.43 

Moscow 132.52 

Mt. Vernon 76.95 

North Fork 15.68 

Tleasant Valley - 1,590.06 



July 

I93u 



The Missionary Visitor 



293 



10. 



11. 



Sangerville 631.14 

Staunton 132.00 

Summit 641.06 

Valley Bethel 193.44 

Waynesboro 57.03 

White Hill 38.50 

Unallocated 28.90 

Northern Virginia 

Brocks Gap $ 

Cook's Creek 602.29 

Damascus 2.00 

Flat Rock 621.43 

Greenmount 762 93 

Harrisonburg 248.74 

Linville Creek 725.86 

Lower # Lost River 36.21 

Mill Creek 2,039.97 

Moorefield 

Mt. Zion 127.50 

Newport 120.24 

No. Mill Creek 10.00 

Pleasant View 26.25 

Powells Fort 20.00 

Riley ville 86.50 

Salem 129.75 

Smiths Creek 62.35 

South Fork 10.50 

Timberville 592.78 

Unity 657.88 

Upper Lost River 58 35 

Woodstock 149.77 

Unallocated 43.95 

First West Virginia 

Allegheny $ 19.00 

Bean Settlement 14.00 

Beaver Run 72.72 

Capon Chapel 3.00 

Cheat River 2.00 

Eglon 955.77 

Greenland 289.50 

Harman 159.09 

Keyser 49.00 

Knobley 257.63 

New Creek 18.00 

North Fork 34.00 

Old Furnace 88.00 

Red Creek 25.00 

Sandy Creek 1,000.28 

Seneca 10.00 

Tearcoat 31991 

White Pine 322.14 

Unallocated 13.00 

Second West Virginia 

Beans Chapel $ 1100 

Bethany 83.00 

Goshen 5.00 

Mt. Hebron 

Mt. Zion 

Pleasant Hill 6.00 

Pleasant Valley 174.75 

Shiloh 

Union Chapel 

Valley River 55 00 

Unallocated 10.00 

Eastern Maryland 

Baltimore, First $ 591.50 

Baltimore, Woodberry 798.87 

Beaver Dam 143.80 

Bethany 598.99 

Bush Creek 458 00 

Denton 649.82 

Edgewood 20.00 

Frederick City 470.80 

Green Hill 280.68 

Locust Grove 88.18 

Long Green Valley 387.42 

Meadow Branch 2,451.65 

Middletown Valley 348.60 

Monocacy 100.00 

Mountaindale 

Myersville 447.33 

Piney Creek 27.32 

Pipe Creek 1,654.31 



Reisterstown 

Sams Creek 379.00 

Thurmont 110.60 

Washington 1,143.37 

Unallocated 593.83 

12. Middle Maryland 

Beaver Creek $ 402.79 

Berkeley 83.79 

Broadfording 477.43 

Brownsville 728.15 

Hagerstown 3,312.48 

Johnstown 4.50 

Licking Creek 13.50 

Long Meadow 503.66 

Manor 458.48 

Pleasant View 1,534.51 

Welsh Run 300.15 

Unallocated 258.99 

13. Western Maryland 

Bear Creek $ 280.00 

Cherry Grove 191.34 

Fairview 28.75 

Frostburg Mission 27.09 

Georges Creek 19.83 

Maple Grove 42.13 

Oak Grove 1.00 

Pine Grove 1.30 

Westernport 92.30 

Unallocated 18.00 

14. S. E. Pa., N. J. & N. Y. 

Ambler $ 637.10 

Amwell 33.00 

Brooklyn, First 178.00 

Brooklyn, Italian Mission 32.00 

Coventry 1,034.69 

Greentree 1,342.37 

Harmony ville 200.71 

Norristown 392.23 

Parkerford 743.40 

Philadelphia (Bethany) 701.03 

Philadelphia (Calvary) 316.36 

Philadelphia (First) 3,753.23 

Philadelphia (Geiger Memorial) 94.00 

Philadelphia (Germantown) 1,278.58 

Pottstown 32.50 

Royersford 1,128.30 

Springfield 395.48 

Wilmington 75.00 

Unallocated * 311.35 

15. Middle Pennsylvania 

Albright $ 196.00 

Altoona, First 1,314.26 

Altoona, 28th St 514.24 

Amaranth 

Ardenheim 234.29 

Artemas 27.34 

Aughwick 179.06 

Bellwood 45.53 

Burnham 41.81 

Carson Valley 24.29 

Cherry Lane 48.25 

Claysburg Mission 88.49 

Clover Creek 746.08 

Dry Valley 559.49 

Dunnings Creek 187.54 

Everett 408.16 

Fairview \73.73 

Glendale 

Hollidaysburg 222.01 

Huntingdon 3,651.04 

James Creek 60.33 

Juniata Park 101.05 

Koontz 215.40 

Leamersville 81.78 

Lewistown 2,615.73 

Lower Claar 22.50 

New Enterprise 1,244.55 

Queen 

Raven Run 22.60 

Riddlesburg 25.69 

Roaring Spring 375.82 

Smithfield 51.93 

Snake Spring 976.40 



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July 

1930 



Spring Mount 170.57 

Spring Run 870.11 

Stonerstown 57.78 

Tyrone 120.64 

Upper Claar 19.05 

Williamsburg 435.70 

Woodbury 715.74 

Yellow Creek 178.71 

Unallocated '. 535.35 

16. Western Pennsylvania 

Bear Run $ 5.00 

Berlin 68.92 

Bolivar 137.06 

Brothersvalley 371.86 

Chess Creek 11.00 

Conemaugh 414.56 

Connellsville 97.01 

Cumberland 17.00 

Elbethel 10.00 

Fairview-Scullton 15.00 

Geiger 316.55 

Georges Creek (Fairchance) 30.00 

Georges Creek (Fairview House) 46.36 

Georges Creek (Uniontown House) 626.34 

Glade Run 137.90 

Greensburg 616.84 

Greenville 52.14 

Hooversville 141.37 

Hyndman 12.72 

Indian Creek 51 : 50 

Johnstown (Walnut Grove) 2,251.81 

Ligoni